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coldbrain / Matthew Culnane

There are five people in coldbrain’s collective.

Huffduffed (714)

  1. Audioboom / Il Grande Torino and the tragedy of Superga

    James Horncastle and Gabriele Marcotti join Jimbo to celebrate the all conquering Torino team of the 1940s, which won 5 straight scudetti before being tragically killed in the Superga air disaster….

    https://audioboom.com/posts/6815938-il-grande-torino-and-the-tragedy-of-superga

    —Huffduffed by coldbrain

  2. 005: Jason Kottke and Twenty Years of kottke.org

    Kottke.org is a website. It is not an app. It is not a product. It is simply a static website, updated daily, running some rickety old blogging software. As of March of 2018 it’s been consistently updated for twenty years. It is largely the product of a single mind: Jason Kottke. Kottke.org has shaped the way many of us have thought about news, blogging, and linking. On Margins talks with Jason about his two decades of blogging, influences in his life that shaped how he works today, and what kottke.org would look like were it a book.  Show Links:  

    kottke.org kottke.org — 10 years old

    kottke.org — 20 years of gratitude and acknowledgements kottke.org — twenty

    Nieman Labs: How Jason Kottke is thinking about kottke.org at 20 Noticing — the kottke.org newsletter written by Tim Carmondy kottke.org memberships

    Full transcript and audio online at: https://craigmod.com/onmargins/005/

    https://craigmod.com/onmargins/005/

    —Huffduffed by coldbrain

  3. Kottke.org’s Jason Kottke, @jkottke | Internet History Podcast

    Jason Kottke, of kottke.org fame, was one of the early bloggers, one of the first bloggers to go pro, and one of the few solo bloggers still going. If you know Kottke.org, then you love it. How could you not? If you’ve never heard of it, you can thank me later. This episode examines what it means to be a publisher on the web for 20 years as well as the discipline required to find cool stuff on the web every single day (almost).

    http://www.internethistorypodcast.com/2018/04/kottke-orgs-jason-kottke-jkottke/

    —Huffduffed by coldbrain

  4. 216: A Sweet Precious Angel with Merlin Mann

    Merlin Mann joins Brett once again to discuss—in typically humorous

    fashion—dogs, personal digital assistants, Apple tech, productivity hacks,

    and more.

    Sponsored by:

    This episode is sponsored by TextExpander. Multiply your team’s

    productivity by making up-to-date, shared knowledge available instantly to

    everyone who needs it. Visit TextExpander.com/podcast for 20% off your

    first year.

    http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/9171/8847160

    —Huffduffed by coldbrain

  5. BBC Radio 4 - In Our Time, The Physics of Reality

    Melvyn Bragg examines the attempt to reconcile Quantum Theory and classical physics.

    Melvyn Bragg examines the physics of reality. When Quantum Mechanics was developed in the early 20th century reality changed forever. In the quantum world particles could be in two places at once, they disappeared for no reason and reappeared in unpredictable locations, they even acted differently according to whether we were watching them. It was so shocking that Erwin Schrodinger, one of the founders of Quantum Theory, said "I don’t like it and I’m sorry I ever had anything to do with it." He even developed an experiment with a cat to show how absurd it was. Quantum Theory was absurd, it disagreed with the classical physics of Newton and Einstein and it clashed with our experience of the everyday world. Footballs do not disappear without reason, cats do not split into two and shoes do not act differently when we are not looking at them. Or do they? Eighty years later we are still debating whether the absurd might actually be true. But why are features of quantum physics not seen in our experience of everyday reality? Can the classical and quantum worlds be reconciled, and why should reality make sense to us? With Roger Penrose, Emeritus Rouse Ball Professor of Mathematics, Oxford University; Fay Dowker, Lecturer in Theoretical Physics, Queen Mary, University of London; Tony Sudbery, Professor of Mathematics, University of York.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00548dl

    —Huffduffed by coldbrain

  6. Upgrade 189: Obsolescence Isn’t What It Used to Be — Upgrade — Overcast

    https://overcast.fm/+Fcm8ULZ74/1:00:47

    —Huffduffed by coldbrain

  7. Episode 1 - How to Think by Alan Jacobs - Close Minded Podcast

    http://media.blubrry.com/closemindedpodcast/p/traffic.libsyn.com/closemindedpodcast/S01E01_how-to-think-alan-jacobs.mp3Podcast: Download (Duration: 45:01 — 20.6MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Google Play | Stitcher | RSS | More

    Episode 1 – How to Think by Alan Jacobs

    In this episode Seth and Josh discuss Alan Jacobs’ recent book, “How to Think: A Survival Guide for a World at Odds.”

    Jacobs is Distinguished Professor of Humanities in the Honors Program at Baylor University in Waco, Texas, and a Resident Fellow of Baylor’s Institute for the Studies of Religion.

    He has written widely on the intersection of technology and theology, the pleasures of reading in an age of distraction, a cultural history of the doctrine of original sin, Christians in the academic world, a biography of C.S. Lewis’ imagination, and much more.

    In describing “How to Think”, Jacobs notes the following:

    Thinking is hard, really hard, and there are a thousand forces at work preventing us from doing it. But we can all think better. And if we learn to think together, then maybe we can learn to live together too.

    Here are some of my key themes:

    the dangers of thinking against others

    the need to find the best people to think with

    the error of believing that we can think for ourselves

    how thinking can be in conflict with belonging

    the dangers of words that do our thinking for us

    If you enjoy the show, please subscribe!

    Bonus Content: A Conversation on the Imagination of C.S. Lewis – Alan Jacobs, N.D. Wilson, and Doug Wilson

    ++++++++++++++++

    Intro music courtesy of LEVV.Outro music courtesy of David Ramirez.

    Share this:TweetShare on Tumblr

    https://closemindedpodcast.com/episodes/episode-1-how-to-think-alan-jacobs/

    —Huffduffed by coldbrain

  8. Maria Popova on Writing, Workflow, and Workarounds | The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

    "Why put in the effort to explain why it isn’t a fit, if they haven’t done the homework to determine if it is a fit?" - Maria Popova [1:23:00] Maria Popova has written for amazing outlets like The Atlantic and The New York Times, but I find her most amazing project to be BrainPickings.org.

    https://tim.blog/2014/10/21/brain-pickings/

    —Huffduffed by coldbrain

  9. Episode 49: Pick 2: Bear and DEVONthink – AppStories

    Federico and John take a deeper look at two favorite apps. In this installment: Bear and DEVONthink.

    https://appstories.net/episodes/49/

    —Huffduffed by coldbrain

  10. The Roots Of Van Morrison’s ‘Astral Weeks’ | Here & Now

    This fall marks the 50th anniversary of the release of the album, regarded as one of the most original-sounding and important of the rock era.

    http://www.wbur.org/hereandnow/2018/03/29/van-morrison-astral-weeks

    —Huffduffed by coldbrain

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