cmagogo / Joey Northcutt

There are no people in cmagogo’s collective.

Huffduffed (38)

  1. The Problem of Sock Puppets

    On the Media, a US NPR program, examines what happened when Dilbert creator Scott Adams joined Metafilter to defend himself in a forum criticizing him, but did so using a pseudonym. Scott Adams was outed very quickly by members in the forum, but Metafilter also confirmed it was Scott Adams after he refused to admit it himself.

    A great overview explaining the various cultures and community mores that exist across the internet, just as all communities differ from each other. The best overview how complicated social can be in 6 minutes.

    —Huffduffed by cmagogo

  2. Robot Opera and Immortality

    http://onpoint.wbur.org/2011/03/07/robot-opera

    In the new robot opera, “Death and the Powers,” humans are history. So is flesh and blood- as ‘so over’ as the dinosaurs.

    The high-tech drama, composed by Tod Machover, tells the story of how one eccentric billionaire led the way, by refusing to die. He uploads himself – his mind – into the realm of digital immortality, and leaves his worldly body behind. Machover, known as “America’s most wired composer” and director of the Opera of the Future group at the MIT Media Lab, thinks of his character Simon Powers, as “a combination of Howard Hughes, Walt Disney and Bill Gates,” who rather than wanting to live forever, desired “to leave the world, but leave everything about himself here.”

    —Huffduffed by cmagogo

  3. Listen to the podcast: Tim Brown

    Podcast and transcript from Intersections 07 of Tim Brown of Ideo, discussing ‘design thinking’, and whether it can help us be more optimistic about the future of design

    http://www.designcouncil.org.uk/resources-and-events/Designers/Intersections-071/The-challenges-of-design-thinking/

    —Huffduffed by cmagogo

  4. Shane Morris — Interaction design school 101

    When I first picked up Matthew Frederick’s book: “101 Things I Learned in Architecture School” I was struck by the num ber of prin ci ples of archi tec ture that can be directly applied to inter ac tion design, but also dis il lu sioned by the fact that Interaction Designers gen er ally do not have a sim i lar body of knowl edge to draw on. Sure we have lots of “process”, but rel a tively lit tle “wis dom” of the sort found in this book.

    The field of Interaction Design isn’t very old — If we’re talk ing purely soft ware inter­face design, then let’s say about 25 years old. No sur prise, then, that we bor row heav­ily (and unashamedly) from a range of other, more estab lished, dis ci plines. We try to com pen sate for our rel a tive lack of a his tory, tra di tion or body of knowl edge by lever­ag ing oth ers’. That’s entirely appro pri ate — but how far does it get us? Interaction Design is an essen tial com po nent of the deliv ery of vir tu ally any prod uct or ser vice today. Many of us may already be at the point where we inter act with more dig i tal prod ucts in a day than we do phys i cal prod ucts, and many of the most impor tant trans ac tions in our lives are entirely vir tual. Maybe Interaction Design needs to be taken a bit more seriously?

    In this talk I’d like to reflect on my almost 20 years as an inter ac tion designer — the things I’ve learned along the way, and the things I wish I would have learned at Interaction Design School, if such a thing had existed back then. Along the way we’ll review some of the 101 things we all should have learned in Interaction Design School, sourced from ixd101​.com (the blog I share with Matt Morphett), and beyond.

    —Huffduffed by cmagogo

  5. 101 things I (should have) learned in interaction design school

    In this presentation we want to capitalise on this compelling form of bite-size information by delivering a rapid-fire journey through a set of interaction design tips and tricks (not principles, not patterns, not heuristics) inspired directly by the “101 Things I Learnt in Architecture School” book. The idea is to use the audience to randomly suggest numbers from 1 to 101 and see how many of them we (or if we fail, you) can translate into an analogous interaction design tip.

    —Huffduffed by cmagogo

  6. Strategic interaction design

    Interaction design is often focused at the interface between a person and a system in the form of a series of request-response actions. But interaction design can be positioned at the strategic level when the interaction designer looks at the transition between interactions & touchpoints; and the aggregate effect of these interactions on the overall service experience.

    —Huffduffed by cmagogo

Page 1 of 4Older