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clagnut / collective

There are nine people in clagnut’s collective.

Huffduffed (4524)

  1. Track Changes: Lara Hogan on Engineering and Public Speaking

    Demystifying public speaking: this week Paul and Rich talk to Lara Hogan, an engineering director at Etsy whose most recent book, Demystifying Public Speaking, aims to help get more diverse voices onstage in the tech world. Topics covered include overcoming specific fears before getting onstage, how to process feedback, and some of her own experiences onstage, from highlights on down to one particular public-speaking horror show. They also discuss her career at Etsy and the joys and challenges of management.

    http://trackchanges.libsyn.com/lara-hogan-on-engineering-and-public-speaking

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Episode 020: Jenn Schiffer – Greater Than Code

    Guest Starring:

    Jenn Schiffer: @jennschiffer | jennmoney.biz

    Show Notes:

    00:16 – Welcome to “Neon Abstract Podcast Erotica!” …we mean, “Greater Than Code!”

    01:15 – Origin Story

    Bocoup

    03:05 – Art

    06:37 – Viewing Source and Learning How to Code

    11:02 – Getting a Computer Science Degree

    13:56 – Pixel Art, Sexuality in Tech, and Online Presence

    @aphyr (Kyle Kingsbury)

    Ashley Madison Scandal

    26:54 – How do potential employers react to your satire?

    28:41 – CSS Perverts

    36:03 – Vetting Potential Employers and Company Culture; Dealing with Toxic People

    Takeaways:

    Jessica: Everyone has something that they keep quiet about because they aren’t sure of the consequences.

    Coraline: Being privileged enough to have the responsibility to be public and show people that it’s okay that they are who they are.

    Astrid: You don’t have to separate your passions.

    Jenn: We all need a space to feel uninhibited.

    http://www.greaterthancode.com/podcast/episode-020-jenn-schiffer/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. 162 WP-Tonic: Jeremy Keith on Resilient Web Design | WordPress podcast

    Web pioneer Jeremy Keith talks with us about the past and future of the web, native vs. web, and what’s he’s excited about in web development.

    https://www.wp-tonic.com/podcast/162-jeremy-keith/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Episode 025 - From bar-back to frontender

    We’ve all started out somewhere in our career. In previous episodes, we’ve talked about various ways we’ve learned front end development, but haven’t touched on mentorship. In this episode, Sarah Showers joins us in the conversation about starting out as a junior developer and how mentors helped shape us into senior developers.

    Picks

    Girl Develop It - Sarah Showers

    Reach LinkedIn - Sarah Showers

    The Investigator - Ryan Burgess

    Shepard Fairey - We The People - Ryan Burgess

    Istanbul - Derrick Showers

    Apple EarPods - Derrick Showers

    LinkedIn redesign - Derrick Showers

    Bonobo - Migration - Stacy London

    Girls In Tech - Mentorship Program - Stacy London

    https://soundcloud.com/front-end-happy-hour/episode-025-from-bar-back-to-frontender

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Ever Wonder What A Woolly Mammoth Sounds Like?

    About a year ago, in a synthetic biology class at London’s Royal College of Art, 24-year-old Marguerite Humeau learned about the work of Japanese researcher Hideyuki Sawada.

    You might have seen his work in a recent viral video: a creepy, dismembered mouth "singing" a Japanese lullaby. That mouth has been called the most mechanically accurate talking robot, with real moving lips, a windpipe that flexes and expands, and even lungs — a pressurized air tank.

    Humeau was inspired to do the same thing. But with animals.

    "I realized there was no area of science that specialized in extinct sound," she says.

    Enlarge this image Marguerite Humeau’s ‘Lucy’ reconstructs the voicebox of an ancient hominid. Marguerite Humeau That was a year ago.

    Since then, Humeau has completed two works of extinct sound, the first of which is Australopithecus Afarensis. You might know her as Lucy — one of the earliest known hominids.

    Lucy Finds Her Voice

    To recreate Lucy’s voice, Humeau studied available skeletal data from Lucy’s remains. As best she could, she constructed synthetic versions of the resonance cavities in Lucy’s skull. She even spoke to the Martin Birchall, a British doctor who performed only the second successful human larynx transplant on a California woman earlier this year.

    "He told me this very funny story," Humeau says. "I was thinking the woman would get the voice of the donor. And actually she recovered her own voice, meaning that the specificity of the voice doesn’t come from the larynx itself — but from the way you shape air in your lungs and the way it resonates in your resonance cavities. So it meant I was on the right track."

    After more meetings with paleontologists and even an ear, nose and throat doctor, Humeau set to work reconstructing Lucy’s voice box out of resin, silicone and rubber. The result is a haunting yowl that sounds a lot like a human groan.

    "It was an interesting being to me," she says. "What makes the difference between a human voice and an animal sound? The difference is the brain, so we think before we talk. I mean, for most people."

    A Shaggy Sequel

    Enlarge this image Marguerite Humeau worked with the the Institute of Zoo and Wildlife Research in Berlin to study the resonance cavities of elephants, a distant mammoth relative. Marguerite Humeau About the same time she was working on Lucy, Humeau decided she wanted to go bigger.

    How much bigger? Woolly mammoth bigger.

    She met with more experts, elephant vocalization specialists, even the guy who advised Stephen Speilberg on the dinosaur sounds in Jurassic Park.

    French explorer Bernard Buigues was one of her most helpful sources.

    "He has actually been able to touch these animals. They are completely preserved. And so he told me about the smell of them, and being able to touch the fur of a mammoth that lived 10,000 years ago."

    Both works — Lucy and the mammoth — went on display earlier this year at the Royal College of Art. And Humeau was told that children would run in fear from the mammoth’s chest-thumping growl.

    "I would have loved to have seen that," she says. "That was the whole purpose!"

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  6. Episode 753: Blockchain Gang : Planet Money : NPR

    Charlie Shrem went to prison. While he was there, he thought up a better way to move money behind bars. Now, he’s out and trying to sell his idea to international investors.

    http://www.npr.org/sections/money/2017/02/10/514577243/episode-753-blockchain-gang

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. BBC Radio 4 - In Our Time, Darwin: In Our Time, Darwin: On the Origins of Charles Darwin

    To celebrate the 200th anniversary of the birth of Charles Darwin in 2009 and the 150th anniversary of the publication of On the Origin of Species, Melvyn Bragg presents a series about Darwin’s life and work. Melvyn tells the story of Darwin’s early life in Shropshire and discusses the significance of the three years he spent at Cambridge, where his interests shifted from religion to natural science. Featuring contributions from Darwin biographer Jim Moore, geneticist at University College London Steve Jones, fellow of Christ’s College Cambridge David Norman and assistant librarian at Christ’s College Cambridge Colin Higgins.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00g9z9x

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. The Gin Craze

    Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the craze for gin in Britain in the mid 18th Century and the attempts to control it. With the arrival of William of Orange, it became an act of loyalty to drink Protestant, Dutch gin rather than Catholic brandy, and changes in tariffs made everyday beer less affordable. Within a short time, production increased and large sections of the population that had rarely or never drunk spirits before were consuming two pints of gin a week. As Hogarth indicated in his print ‘Beer Street and Gin Lane’ (1751) in support of the Gin Act, the damage was severe, and addiction to gin was blamed for much of the crime in cities such as London.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b084zk6z

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Michael Faraday

    Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the eminent 19th-century scientist Michael Faraday. Born into a poor working-class family, he received little formal schooling but became interested in science while working as a bookbinder’s apprentice. He is celebrated today for carrying out pioneering research into the relationship between electricity and magnetism. Faraday showed that if a wire was turned in the presence of a magnet or a magnet was turned in relation to a wire, an electric current was generated. This ground-breaking discovery led to the development of the electric generator and ultimately to modern power stations. During his life he became the most famous scientist in Britain and he played a key role in founding the Royal Institution’s Christmas lectures which continue today.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b06s9rz9

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Stewart Butterfield on creating Slack, learning from games, and finding your online identity

    If you came by the Vox office, you would find it oddly quiet. That’s not because we don’t like each other, or because we’re not social, or because we don’t have anything to say. It’s because almost all our communication happens silently, digitally, in Slack.

    Slack is Stewart Butterfield’s creation, and it’s the fastest-growing piece on enterprise software in history. But here’s the kicker: he didn’t mean to create it, just like he didn’t mean to create Flickr before it. In both cases, Butterfield was trying to create a new kind of game: immersive, endless, and focused on experiences rather than victories.

    The story of Butterfield’s pivots from the game to Flickr and Slack have become Silicon Valley lore. But in this conversation, we go deep into the part that’s always fascinated me: the game Butterfield wanted to create, the reasons he thinks gaming is so important, and the ways in which his philosophy background informs his current work. We also talk a lot about the nature of status, identity, and communication in online spaces, as Butterfield’s company is now revolutionizing all three.

    This is a deep, interesting, and unusual conversation — we went places I didn’t expect, and I left thinking about topics I’d neve…

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/panoply/stewart-butterfield-on-creating-slack-learning-from-games-and-finding-your-online-identity
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Sat, 11 Feb 2017 01:18:20 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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