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clagnut / collective

There are nine people in clagnut’s collective.

Huffduffed (4319)

  1. Kevin Kelly: The Next 30 Digital Years - The Long Now

    IN KEVIN KELLY’S VIEW, a dozen “inevitable” trends will drive the next 30 years of digital progress. Countless artificial smartnesses, for example, will be added to everything, all quite different from human intelligence and from each other. We will tap into them like we do into electricity to become cyber-centaurs — co-dependent humans and AIs. All of us will need to perpetually upgrade just to stay in the game.

    Every possible surface that can become a display will become a display, and will study its watchers. Everything we encounter, “if it cannot interact, it is broken.” Virtual and augmented reality (VR and AR) will become the next platform after smartphones, conveying a profound sense of experience (and shared experience), transforming education (“it burns different circuits in your brain”), and making us intimately trackable. Everything will be tracked, monitored, sensored, and imaged, and people will go along with it because “vanity trumps privacy,”as already proved on Facebook. “Wherever attention flows, money will follow.”

    Access replaces ownership for suppliers as well as consumers. Uber owns no cars; AirBnB owns no real estate. On-demand rules. Sharing rules. Unbundling rules. Makers multiply. “In thirty years the city will look like it does now because we will have rearranged the flows, not the atoms. We will have a different idea of what a city is, and who we are, and how we relate to other people.”

    In the Q&A, Kelly was asked what worried him. “Cyberwar,” he said. “We have no rules. Is it okay to take out an adversary’s banking system? Disasters may have to occur before we get rules. We’re at the point that any other civilization in the galaxy would have a world government. I have no idea how to do that.”

    Kelly concluded: “We are at the beginning of the beginning — the first hour of day one. There have never been more opportunities. The greatest products of the next 25 years have not been invented yet.

    “You‘re not late.“

    —Stewart Brand

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02016/jul/14/next-30-digital-years/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Think Culture Is a Space Opera? Nah, It’s a Trojan Horse | WIRED

    In the latest ‘Geeks’ Guide to the Galaxy’ podcast, Simone Caroti discusses his critical survey of the Culture series by sci-fi author Iain Banks.

    http://www.wired.com/2016/06/geeks-guide-iain-banks/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Neal Stephenson, “Seveneves”

    Neil Stephenson’s novels, including The Baroque Trilogy and Reamde, are a dazzling blend of imagination and science, philosophy and history. His new novel, SEVENEVES, starts with the end of the world. This epic follows the descendants of the exiled Earthlings to their new outpost at the far reaches of the cosmos. The population grows, divides into seven races and ultimately returns to the long-abandoned home, which is unlike anything they have previously experienced.

    Founded by Carla Cohen and Barbara Meade in 1984, Politics & Prose Bookstore is Washington, D.C.’s premier independent bookstore and cultural hub, a gathering place for people interested in reading and discussing books. Politics & Prose offers superior service, unusual book choices, and a haven for book lovers in the store and online. Visit them on the web at http://www.politics-prose.com/

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rIHF6vDv8AE
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Mon, 25 Jul 2016 21:27:07 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. A Fireside Chat with Jen Simmons & Jeffrey Zeldman [Design Driven by FirstMark]

    A fireside chat with Jeffrey Zeldman and Jen Simmons on the Past, Present, and Future of Web & Interaction Design. Jen is Designer Advocate at Mozilla and host of "The Web Ahead", among other pursuits. Jeffrey’s writing and work has helped shape the web as we know it.

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cSODQpPcTKI
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. BBC World Service - Discovery, “Faster, Better, Cheaper”

    Kevin Fong explores the success and failure of NASA’s missions to Mars

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p041b4k4

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. RWD Podcast #51 — Responsive Web Design

    I talk about using a combination of your own CMS, RSS feed and something like IFTTT to post it for you. I use IFTTT for posting articles to Surf the Dream, saving images from Facebook, posting news articles to Facebook… although now I’m trialling Zapier.Speaking of Wordpress, I also delve into some issues that I recently came across with a clients site.changing URLs - why that can be badLinks don’t workno natively support 301 redirectsPage templates failing

    https://responsivedesign.is/podcasts/rwd-podcast-51

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. BBC World Service - Discovery, The Alien Equation

    50th anniversary of the equation that launched the search for ET.

    Kevin Fong celebrates the anniversary of one of the most iconic equations ever written. The Drake Equation was created by Frank Drake some half a century ago in a bid to answer one of the most profound questions facing science and humanity: are we alone? Its creation launched a 50 year, genuine scientific endeavour to search for ET, known as SETI: The Search for Extra Terrestrial Intelligence. Kevin visits the SETI Institute in Northern California, to meet the great man himself, Frank Drake, and some of his scientific colleagues who have spent most of their working lives hunting for signs of alien life, out there in the cosmic ether.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p009rtr0

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. BBC World Service - Discovery, The Feynman Variations

    Brian Cox presents a tribute to Richard Feynman.

    Widely regarded as the finest physicist of his generation and the most influential since Einstein, Feynman did much to popularise science, through lectures, books and television, not least his revelation at a press conference in which he demonstrated the exact cause of the Challenger Shuttle explosion in 1986.

    Described as the ‘Mozart of physics’, Feynman’s amazing life and career seemingly had no end of highlights.

    A student at MIT and then Princeton (where he obtained an unprecedented perfect score on the entrance exam for maths and physics), he was drafted onto the Manhattan Project as a junior scientist.

    There his energy and talents made a significant mark on two of the project’s leaders, Robert Oppenheimer and Hans Bethe.

    The latter would become Feynman’s lifelong mentor and friend.

    Bethe called his student "a magician", setting him apart from other scientists as ‘no ordinary genius’.

    In 1965, Feynman shared a Nobel Prize for his unique contribution to the field of Quantum Electrodynamics making him the most celebrated, influential and best known American Physicist of his generation

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00b6djp

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Non Breaking Space Show #86: Dave Olsen — Pattern Lab 2 - Goodstuff FM

    In this show, Christopher Schmitt talks with Dave Olsen, programmer/ project manager with West Virginia University, about the recent release of Pattern Lab 2. Pattern Lab helps teams build thoughtful, pattern-driven UIs using atomic design principles.

    http://goodstuff.fm/nbsp/86

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. BBC Radio 4 - Computing Britain, Connected Thinking

    Long before the heroics of the world wide web, the internet was born out of a mixture of American ambition and British thrift. Packet Switching was the name coined by Welsh computer scientist Donald Davies in an effort to link the early computers in the labs of the National Physical Laboratory in Teddington.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b069xdy3

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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