citizenk / collective

There are eight people in citizenk’s collective.

Huffduffed (5581)

  1. #23 – Psycho – Settling the Score

    Find out how much praise we shower on the AFI’s #4 – Bernard Herrmann’s score for 1960’s Psycho! How did arguably the most famous of all film score cues result from ignoring Hitchcock’s specific instructions? What did Herrmann see in this film beyond even what Hitchcock perhaps intended? And, how would you spell the Psycho noise? Plus, a special appearance by Jon’s wife Becky for some insight into violin techniques.

    http://www.settlingthescorepodcast.com/23-psycho/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Strategies for Teaching HAES® to Fat Phobic Physicians

    Presented by: Lesley Williams, MD, CEDS. The medical community is a primary source of weight stigmatization. Multiple studies have proven that the marginalization of people of size leads to poor health outcomes and makes patients less inclined to seek needed medical care. The goal of this oral presentation is to equip HAES practitioners with tools to educate fat phobic medical providers in their community on how to approach patients of varying sizes. Many HAES practitioners avoid conversations with the medical community on this topic due to the strong stance that is taken by physicians re: the ‘War on Obesity’. Medical providers are often conditioned to treat the patient’s BMI, rather than the actual patient. Patients frequently report that they could present to a physician’s office with an acute injury and the only thing the doctor wants to discuss is their BMI. This talk seeks to explore innovative ways to engage medical providers who are resistant to utilizing the HAES approach in their practices.

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZJPKWuePFlA
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Thu, 07 Feb 2019 22:34:37 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by marshallkirkpatrick

  3. Start The Week: The health of science

    Tom Sutcliffe with Sir Robert Lechler, Jo Dunkley, Bernie Bulkin and Elizabeth Pisani.

    There is nothing new for chemistry to discover, says Bernie Bulkin. In Solving Chemistry: A Scientist’s Journey, the former Head of Science at BP argues that an unprecedented event has happened: a branch of science has made all the major discoveries it is likely to make. He tells Tom Sutcliffe what this means for chemistry - and for science more broadly.

    Medicine is in the midst of ‘a biomedical revolution’ says Professor Sir Robert Lechler. His own field of kidney transplants has been transformed by our new understanding of the immune system. He has helped to curate Spare Parts, an exhibition at the Science Gallery that poses the question: how many transplants could we have before we were no longer ourselves?

    Elizabeth Pisani has watched interest in different diseases rise and fall. As an epidemiologist she charts the impact that press attention and public grants have on medical research, with some becoming fashionable while in others treatments lag behind. And she warns that scientists too often fail to take account of the human context when delivering medicines.

    Astrophysicist Jo Dunkley assesses our understanding of the universe in a concise new guide. But the universe is 85% dark matter - and we still know very little about this. She draws attention to the brilliant female scientists who contributed to breakthroughs in physics, but whose contributions have been forgotten along the way.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m00026ws

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Start The Week: Who is watching you?

    Shoshana Zuboff, John Thornhill and Ece Temelkuran with Andrew Marr.

    Society is at a turning point, warns Professor Shoshana Zuboff. Democracy and liberty are under threat as capitalism and the digital revolution combine forces. She tells Andrew Marr how new technologies are not only mining our minds for data, but radically changing them in the process. As Facebook celebrates its 15th birthday she examines what happens when a few companies have unprecedented power and little democratic oversight.

    Although behavioural data is constantly being abstracted by tech companies, John Thornhill, Innovations Editor at the Financial Times, questions whether they have yet worked out how to use it effectively to manipulate people. And he argues that the technological revolution has brought many innovations which have benefitted society.

    The award-winning writer Ece Temelkuran has warned readers about rising authoritarianism in her native Turkey. In her new book, How To Lose a Country, she widens that warning to the rest of the world. She argues that right-wing populism and nationalism do not appear already fully-formed in government - but creep insidiously in the shadows, unchallenged and underestimated until too late.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0002b8l

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Queue Theory and Design - 99% Invisible

    In the US, it’s called a line. In Canada, it’s often referred to as a line-up. Pretty much everywhere else, it’s known as a queue. My friend Benjamen Walker is obsessed with queues. He keeps sending me YouTube clips of queue violence. This preoccupation led him to find a man known as “Dr. Queue.”

    https://99percentinvisible.org/episode/episode-49-queue-theory-and-design/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Martin Rees: Prospects for Humanity - The Long Now

    To think usefully about humanity’s future, you have to bear everything in mind simultaneously. Nobody has managed that better than Martin Rees in his succinct summing-up book: ON THE FUTURE: Prospects for Humanity.

    As the recent President of the Royal Society (and longtime Royal Astronomer), Rees is current with all the relevant science and technology. At 76, he has seen a lot of theories about the future come and go. He has expert comfort in thinking at cosmic scale and teaching the excitement of that perspective. He has explored the darkest scenarios in a previous book, OUR FINAL HOUR: A Scientist’s Warning (2004), which examined potential extreme threats from nuclear weapons, biotechnology, artificial intelligence, climate change, and terrorism. Civilization’s greatest danger comes from civilization itself, which now operates at planetary scale. Consequently, he says, to head off the hazards and realize humanity’s potentially fabulous prospects, "We need to think globally, we need to think rationally, we need to think long-term.”

    And we can.

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02019/jan/14/prospects-humanity/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. N.K. Jemisin’s book recommendations from the Ezra Klein Show - Vox

    The award-winning Broken Earth trilogy author shares her favorite sci-fi stories from Octavia Butler and Martha Wells.

    https://www.vox.com/2018/8/27/17779026/ezra-klein-show-book-recommendations-n-k-jemisin-broken-earth-hugo-award

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. I Think You’re Interesting - Why 2001: A Space Odyssey is still one of the greatest films ever made, 50 years later | Listen via Stitcher Radio On Demand

    Even if you haven’t seen 2001: A Space Odyssey, Stanley Kubrick’s mind-melting 1968 science fiction epic, you probably know at least something about it. It’s one of those movies, like Star Wars or Citizen Kane, that has become so thoroughly dissolved into our pop culture that you’ll have heard of the villainous computer HAL or know the famed music cue (Richard Strauss’ “Also sprach Zarathustra”) that plays over its most indelible images.

    But how were those moments created? The story of 2001 is the story of an almost obsessive attention to detail, of a budget that almost completely destroyed the film’s studio, of an initial wave of terrible reviews that might have killed a lesser movie. At every step of the way along its production process (and even after its release), 2001 is a fascinating example of big-time moviemaking gone right.This week, Todd is joined first by Vox film critic Alissa Wilkinson to talk about 2001’s long legacy, then by author Michael Benson, whose book Space Odyssey Stanley Kubrick, Arthur C. Clarke, and the Making of a Masterpiece is the definitive account of the making of the film, to talk about how this titanic achievement came to be.

    https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/vox/i-think-youre-interesting/e/54242528

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. 345: Maintaining npm with Laurie Voss - ShopTalk

    Laurie Voss is the co-founder and Chief Data Officer of npm and he stopped by the show to talk a bit about npm’s history, some of the issues it faces now, as well as what’s in store for the web in 2019.

    https://shoptalkshow.com/episodes/345/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. What the ’90s Web Can Teach Us About the Future of the Internet

    Fire up your Netscape Navigators! Alli and Jen talk to Jay Hoffmann, author of The History of the Web, about his research into the early internet.

    The History of the Web is a weekly newsletter that began as a place for coders to reminisce about CSS and Bulletin Board software. But it quickly evolved into a definitive timeline of our shared online history. The story of the Web (the public-facing network of pages that everyone has access to) is arguably the most important sociological endeavor of our time.

    This week on 2 Girls 1 Podcast, Alli and Jen (actors who perform weird internet stuff on stage) chat with Jay Hoffmann, author of The History of the Web, about his inspiration and research into the early internet, and the proto-communities that formed online in the ’90s around weblogs, browser wars, grief, and virtual pets.

    https://www.dailydot.com/debug/history-of-the-web-2-girls-1-podcast/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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