Tagged with “life” (8)

  1. COVID-19: The unvarnished truth from Doc G. | jlcollinsnh

    Desperate times call for desperate measures. So I highjacked Doc G’s podcast. That’s him above. There is so much nonsense swirling around COVID-19, right down to the correct name, I was starting to get lost sorting it out. What I needed was guidance from someone without an agenda. Someone who had the education and training… [Continue Reading]

    https://jlcollinsnh.com/2020/03/22/covid-19-the-unvarnished-truth-from-doc-g/

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    Tagged with life

    —Huffduffed by chrispederick

  2. Craig Venter: Life at the Speed of Light : NPR

    In his new book Life at the Speed of Light: From the Double Helix to the Dawn of Digital Life, Craig Venter writes of the brave new world synthetic biology may some day deliver: from consumer devices that print out the latest flu vaccine to instruments on Mars landers that analyze Martian DNA and teleport it back to Earth to be studied or recreated.

    http://www.npr.org/2013/10/25/240751591/craig-venter-life-at-the-speed-of-light

    —Huffduffed by chrispederick

  3. The Life Scientific: Jocelyn Bell-Burnell

    Jim al-Khalili talks to the astronomer Jocelyn Bell Burnell about missing out a Nobel Prize, sexism in science and a strange smudge in the data from a radio telescope. While others dismissed this smudge as insignificant, Jocelyn revealed a series of strange flashing signals. They might have been evidence of faulty radio telescope or even messages from a little green man; but Jocelyn thought otherwise and her determination to get to the bottom of it all, led to one of the most exciting discoveries in 20th century astronomy, the discovery of pulsars, those dense cores of collapsed stars.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/tls/all

    —Huffduffed by chrispederick

  4. The Life Scientific: Steven Pinker

    Jim al-Khalili talks to Steven Pinker, a scientist who’s not afraid of controversy. From verbs to violence, many say his popular science books are mind-changing. He explains why toddlers say “holded” not held and “digged” rather than dug; how children’s personalities are shaped largely by their genes and why, he believes the recent rioters had plenty of self-esteem.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/tls/all

    —Huffduffed by chrispederick

  5. This American Life: Oh You Shouldn’t Have

    Stories about the perils of giving and receiving gifts: Ones that go over spectacularly well in spite of being in poor taste, and ones that flop even with the best intentions. Including what happens when - surprise! - your whole past gets laid out for a live TV audience.

    —Huffduffed by chrispederick

  6. Science & the Search for Meaning: What is Life?

    Scientists can now explain virtually every stage of the evolutionary process. But there’s a basic question that still mystifies even the best scientists: How did life first begin on Earth? Or to put in another way, how did non-life somehow turn into life? And can we say the Earth itself is alive? In this hour of To the Best of Our Knowledge we’ll talk with James Lovelock about his Gaia theory, and explore the question, What is Life?

    SEGMENT 1:

    This hour explores some of the fundamental mysteries of life - from how it first started on Earth to the possibility of supremely intelligent life on other planets and why technology is evolving like life itself. We begin with a rare recording of Nobel Prize winning physicist Edwin Schrodinger and comments on his book "What Is Life?" from Nobel Prize winning biologists James Watson and Harold Varmus. We also hear from Ken Miller, co-author of the most widely used biology textbook in American high schools, and Craig Venter, widely regarded as one of science’s leading innovators. Venter, who’s come as close as anyone has to creating life in a test tube, tells Steve Paulson what drives him. And we hear from some ordinary people about what they think life is.

    SEGMENT 2:

    University of Wisconsin geochemist Nita Sahai talks with Anne Strainchamps about how life might have begun on Earth. On the other hand, maybe the Earth itself is alive. That’s the remarkable idea behind the Gaia hypothesis. James Lovelock came up with it in the 1960s and at first no one would take him seriously. Lovelock, now in his nineties and one of our most celebrated scientists, tells Steve Paulson where the Gaia theory came from and how it’s evolved.

    SEGMENT 3:

    Kevin Kelly is one of the founders of Wired magazine. He’s also the author of a provocative book called "What Technology Wants." Kelly tells Jim Fleming that the sum total of our technology - what he calls "the technicum" - is taking on the properties of life itself. And anthropologist Tom Boellstorff takes us on a tour through the virtual world of Second Life. Astro-biologist Paul Davies chairs the SETI Post-Detection Task Group and is the author of "The Eerie Silence: Renewing Our Search for Alien Intelligence." He tells Steve Paulson that alien intelligence might be stranger than anything Hollywood has dreamt up.

    http://www.wpr.org/book/101121a.cfm

    —Huffduffed by chrispederick

  7. Original Recipe | This American Life

    The formula for Coca-Cola is one of the most jealously guarded trade secrets in the world. Locked in a vault in Atlanta. Supposedly unreplicable. But we think we may have found the original recipe. And to see if the formula actually might be Coke, we made a batch.

    http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/episode/427/original-recipe

    —Huffduffed by chrispederick

  8. Shot of Jaq: Life Online Part 1: The Balance

    With many of us spending increasing amounts of time plugged into our laptops and servers, in this first of a two-shot series, Jono Bacon and Stuart ‘Aq’ Langridge explore how we balance our online and offline lives, the heath implications, and the challenges that face us with mobile devices and how to get away.

    http://shotofjaq.org/2010/01/life-online-part-1-the-balance/

    —Huffduffed by chrispederick