chrispederick / collective

There are five people in chrispederick’s collective.

Huffduffed (4069)

  1. The Free-Range Archivist: Jason Scott

    Today, The Keepers continues with the launch of "Keeper of the Day," our new daily, year-long social media series featuring keepers from around the world. {Kind of like baseball cards}. Keeper of the Day will arrive in an array of modes—radio, podcasts, photographs, graphics, videos, quotes…. 

    Along with more stories of activist archivists, rogue librarians, curators, collectors and historians, we’ll be featuring keepers of all kinds—river keepers, seed keepers, climate keepers, peacekeepers—stewards of culture, civil liberties, the land, the free flow of information and ideas—people who take it upon themselves to preserve and protect.

    Keeper of the Day (#keeperoftheday) will appear on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, kitchensisters.org, emails, and beyond. We’ll be telling in a medley of mediums. Daily for a year. A keeper a day.

    We begin this wing of the series at the Internet Archive in San Francisco. Twas there we met him. 

    Keeper #1: The Free-Range Archivist: Jason Scott, the public facing mouth of the Internet Archive. Listen and you’ll see why. This story was produced by one of our mighty interns, Juliet Gelfman-Randazzo, in collaboration with The Kitchen Sisters. This is Juliet’s first story. She took the reins and we were knocked out by what she did. Jim …

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/kitchensisters/the-free-range-archivist-jason-scott
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Tue, 16 Oct 2018 22:20:20 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  2. My Url Is aaronparecki.com

    My Url Is features a new guest every two weeks to talk about how they got involved with the IndieWeb and what hopes, goals and aspirations they have for the community and for their website. The guests are a combination of those both new to the IndieWeb and those who have helped build it from the beginning.

    https://myurlis.com/episodes/001/

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  3. Bruce Sterling: Speculative architecture (September 26, 2018)

    Hernan Diaz Alonso introduces Bruce Sterling, explaining that this lecture is part of a residency at SCI-Arc, including masterclasses with students.

    Bruce Sterling proposes to speculate about architecture in the 2040s and the 2050s, when the students in the room will be in their 50s. He reviews his longstanding engagement with architecture, and pauses to note the recent passing of Robert Venturi, characterizing him as the rare futurist whose works continue to be a source of inspiration.

    Sterling discusses current situations that suggest issues that could be significant in thirty years, including: •China’s terraforming projects in the South China Sea, and the Belt and Road Initiative. •Astana, Kazakhstan, which Sterling describes as neither Fatehpur Sikri nor Brasília, nor the future, but a possibility. •Dubai as a technocratic autocracy that will not become a hegemon but an entrepôt of futurity •Sterling discusses Estonia’s e-residency initiative as an architectural problem that that will become common in the future, requiring off-shore pop-ups promoting Virtual Estonia, physical bank/embassy registration sites, a physical headquarters within Estonia, plus the physical structures required by virtual enterprises. •In Estonia’s capital Tallinn, Sterling discovered another architectural problem of the mid-21st century: abandoned, failed megastructures, located in sites that will probably be flodded, such as the Lenin Palace of Culture and Sports (Raine Karp and Riina Altmäe, 1980). •Seasteading, which Sterling dismisses as impractical. •Sterling also criticizes efforts of architects to design around the problem of climate-change flooding as “architectural solutionism”. •Sterling considers one result of rising sea levels will be a global proliferation of unregulated squatter districts like Christiania, in Copenhagen: “wet favelas” detached from municipal services. •He notes push-back against Silicon Valley cultural imperialism (e.g. Uber and Airbnb) in places like Barcelona and Turin, as another issue that will grow in significance.

    Sterling argues that the most famous buildings of the mid-21st century will be older buildings, preserved in new ways, and retrofitted for new uses.

    He dismisses artificial intelligence design as “a kaleidoscope,” providing options without insight.

    He discusses Ikea’s Space10 research on autonomous food trucks, predicting that spaces will become mobile in the 21st century. He anticipates that the impact of autonomous cars will be profound: the autonomous car is regular car as the cell phone is to the landline.

    Though he admits that, since Jonathan Swift’s Laputa, there has always been something ridiculous about the idea of flying cities, they might become an option if Earth’s surface becomes too polluted or dangerous.

    Sterling argues that when space travel becomes feasible and cheap, the moon, planets and asteroids will be settled, but out of a sense of “cosmic Weltschmerz.”

    Showing an image of the recent L.A. Forum Reader, he reminds the audience that thirty years isn’t that far off.

    Sterling concludes with a discussion of some of his current projects in Turin: the Casa Jasmina, The Share Festival, and – unexpectedly – the Villa Abegg, where he works on a novel in an Eames lounge chair.

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  4. Human Insecurity

    The French telegraph system was hacked in 1834. What does the incident teach us about modern-day network security?

    The French telegraph system was hacked in 1834 by a pair of thieves who stole financial market information—effectively conducting the world’s first cyberattack. What does the incident teach us about network vulnerabilities, human weakness, and modern-day security? Guests include: Bruce Schneier, security expert.

    http://www.slate.com/articles/podcasts/secret_history_of_the_future/2018/10/what_an_1834_hack_of_the_french_telegraph_system_can_teach_us_about_modern.html

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  5. The Box That AI Lives In

    How could an 18th-century robot win at chess? By using a trick that big tech firms still pull on us today.

    In the new podcast The Secret History of the Future, from Slate and the Economist: Examine the history of tech to uncover stories that help us illuminate the present and predict the future. From the world’s first cyberattack in 1834 to 19th-century virtual reality, the Economist’s Tom Standage and Slate’s Seth Stevenson find the ancient ingenuity that our modern digital technology can learn from and expose age-old weaknesses we are already on a course to repeat.

    In the first episode: An 18th-century device called the Mechanical Turk convinced Europeans that a robot could play winning chess. But there was a trick. It’s a trick that companies like Amazon, Google, and Facebook still pull on us today. Guests include futurist Jaron Lanier and Luis von Ahn, founder of CAPTCHA and Duolingo.

    http://www.slate.com/articles/podcasts/secret_history_of_the_future/2018/09/a_200_year_old_chess_playing_robot_explains_the_internet.html

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  6. An Astronaut, a Catalan, and Two Linguists Walk Into a Bar… (Ep. 343) - Freakonomics Freakonomics

    In this live episode of “Tell Me Something I Don’t Know,” we learn why New York has skinny skyscrapers, how to weaponize water, and what astronauts talk about in space. Joining Stephen J. Dubner as co-host is the linguist John McWhorter; Bari Weiss (The New York Times) is the real-time fact-checker.

    http://freakonomics.com/podcast/tmsidk-2018/

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  7. 154 – ☀️ Dan Mall – An Event Apart Orlando 2018 – Thunder Nerds

    From one designer to a front-end developer: I’m so grateful for you. You take my pretty pictures and turn them into real-live websites and applications; you convert ideas and sketches into real things that people can use. And even despite that superpower, you rarely get the respect you deserve. It’s time for that to change. No longer will I throw my comps over the proverbial wall for you to blindly build. I’ll change my process for you. Let’s sketch together more to be more efficient and effective as a team. Let’s decide in the browser more. I’ll learn to write JSON for you. Let’s share stories about new, more modern ways of shipping products at higher quality in record time. This is gonna be great!

    https://www.thundernerds.io/2018/10/dan-mall-an-event-apart-orlando-2018/

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  8. Gimlet Creative | Good Design is Human | Gimlet Creative

    “How do we design systems that support people and humanity, as opposed to just getting the job done? ”

    —Irene Au

    From airplane crashes, to industrial disasters and medical error: When things go terribly wrong, why do we blame human beings instead of bad design?

    https://creative.gimletmedia.com/episode/good-design-human-centric/

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  9. Setting the Record Straight by Going Wayback

    The public web is a fact checker’s dream, but not everything stays up forever. More than just an invaluable contribution to collective memory, the practice of web crawling, indexing and archiving empowers the research and journalism that is ultimately required to speak truth to power.

    Speaker: Mark Graham - Director, the Wayback Machine, The Internet Archive

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/onlinenewsassociation/setting-the-record-straight-by-going-wayback
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Mon, 08 Oct 2018 20:50:20 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  10. Podcast 211: Tom Ellis (Ellis Mandolins, Precision Pearl, Inc.) | Fretboard Journal

    Austin, Texas-based Tom Ellis is widely considered to be one of the finest mandolin makers working today. On this week’s podcast, we chat with Tom about his unique journey into the world of fretted instruments (from surfboard shaper to luthier) and about the fateful day in 1977 he showed Ricky Skaggs his recently-completed second mandolin. Tom also comically describes the five year period when he gave Bill Collings some shop space in the early ’80s, talks about his workflow and how he employs CNCs to help him out, and tells us about the inlay work he does for other instrument makers via his company Precision Pearl, Inc.

    This episode is brought to you by Lee Valley and Retrofret.

    If you like the FJ Podcast, we hope you’ll leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, iTunes or wherever you stream it.

    https://www.fretboardjournal.com/podcasts/podcast-211-tom-ellis-ellis-mandolins-precision-pearl-inc./

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