Peer One on Ones - Part 1 | Manager Tools

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  1. Peer One on Ones - Part 1 | Manager Tools

    This guidance recommends why and how to meet weekly, or regularly, with your peer managers.

    The higher you go up in your organization, the more you realize that youre actually less and less able to get things done all by yourself. CEOs say they feel like theyre running in oatmeal they cant make things happen as directly as they used to. When youre the VP of Sales, you cant MAKE that new product you just KNOW your customers will buy like crazy. If youre the Chief of Manufacturing, even a perfectly made product has to be sold by someone else.

    Simply put: relationships grow in importance over the course of ones career. And that means an effective manager, a Manager Tools Manager, will spend time developing and maintaining important internal relationships. There are a lot of ways to do this, but the easiest is to use the Manager Tools Peer One on One Model.

    https://www.manager-tools.com/2011/04/peer-one-ones-part-1

    —Huffduffed by jozsurf

  2. I Am A Former Peer | Manager Tools

    Our guidance how to deal with not being promoted, when your former team member is now your boss.

    One of the most requested Manager Tools casts was "How To Manage a Disgruntled, Non-Promoted Direct".

    The cast was written for new managers whose former peers were struggling with the new relationship.

    But what if you’re the person who wasn’t promoted.

    How do you deal with your own feelings and develop a new, productive, respectful, manager-direct relationship?

    https://www.manager-tools.com/2012/01/i-am-a-former-peer

    —Huffduffed by mealybar

  3. Handling Peer Conflict When Your Directs Are Involved (Part 1 of 2) | Manager Tools

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    Questions This Guidance Answers: What do I do when I’m in conflict with a peer?

    What do I do when conflict includes multiple people?

    How do deconflict my team?

    What do you do when you’re in conflict with a peer… and your directs become involved?

    What’s interesting here is that we all ought to know that if we ARE in conflict with a peer, our directs ARE involved.

    Our directs know who among our peers are our allies, and who we don’t align well with.

    Our directs make choices, perhaps subtle, but choices nonetheless, that can add to our tensions (yes, even if we tell them not to).

    What can we do as managers to help our directs deal with a peer of OURS that WE are in conflict with?

    When the peer begins to not behave professionally, and doesn’t meet her responsibilities to projects or teams he’s on… what do you do?

    When the peer expresses disdain, or is less than professional in how he treats one of your team?

      [Play in Popup]

    Extra ContentHow to Handle Peer Conflict When Your Directs are Involved Shownotes (PDF)

    How to Handle Peer Conflict When Your Directs are Involved Slides (PDF)

    Legend:     Manager Tools Personal License    Interviewing Series    First Job Fundamentals   

    http://www.manager-tools.com/2007/02/handling-peer-conflict-when-your-directs-are-involved-part-1-of-2

    —Huffduffed by skiaec04

  4. The First Rule for New Managers | Manager Tools

    In this cast, we share the First Rule For New Managers: the most important recommendation for someone taking over a team.

    We have been asked hundreds of times for guidance on what to do as a new manager, and we’re finally ready to start rolling out this series of casts.

    This first cast will probably surprise some of our listeners, because it’s pretty counterintuitive.

    On the other hand, we have alluded to it in a few casts before.

    It’s just not what most people think it should be.

    We’ll tell you as well what most managers do…and why they’re wrong.

    The first in a series: The Manager Tools Guidelines For New Managers

    https://www.manager-tools.com/2008/03/the-first-rule-for-new-managers

    —Huffduffed by va3tim

  5. The Myth of the Working Manager | Manager Tools

    If you think you’re a "working manager", and that’s harder somehow, you’re wrong.

    Lots of managers claim "I’m a working manager." It’s a reason to suggest that they don’t have time to manage. But "The Working Manager" is a myth, and there are all kinds of solutions to solve the problem of priority management.

    https://www.manager-tools.com/2017/04/myth-working-manager

    —Huffduffed by stott

  6. Rolling Out the Manager Tools’ Trinity - Part 1 | Manager Tools

    This cast describes how to gradually implement Manager Tools’ Management Trinity (One on Ones, Feedback, Coaching - and Delegation!).

    We’ve been asked a thousand questions about what to do and when to do it when it comes to the Management Trinity, and we’ve finally gotten frustrated enough to do something about it.

    We assumed that a lot of the ideas we’re going to share here just made sense, and managers were taking the parts of the Trinity step by step, mastering each one, and adding new parts as they were able.

    And then we got an email complaining that putting ALL FOUR of the Trinity in place all at once was "JUST TOO HARD".

    And, that listener was right — it was too hard — and we weren’t helping by not sharing our guidance.

    We’ve shared these ideas with hundreds of corporate client managers — and now it’s time to share it with everyone.

    Step by step, here’s how you do it.

    If you ask us, if there WERE a Manager Tools Hall of Fame (HOF), this cast would be in it.

    https://www.manager-tools.com/2008/08/rolling-out-the-manager-tools-trinity-part-1

    —Huffduffed by mpacker

  7. Rolling Out the Manager Tools’ Trinity - Part 1 | Manager Tools

    This cast describes how to gradually implement Manager Tools’ Management Trinity (One on Ones, Feedback, Coaching - and Delegation!).

    We’ve been asked a thousand questions about what to do and when to do it when it comes to the Management Trinity, and we’ve finally gotten frustrated enough to do something about it.

    We assumed that a lot of the ideas we’re going to share here just made sense, and managers were taking the parts of the Trinity step by step, mastering each one, and adding new parts as they were able.

    And then we got an email complaining that putting ALL FOUR of the Trinity in place all at once was "JUST TOO HARD".

    And, that listener was right — it was too hard — and we weren’t helping by not sharing our guidance.

    We’ve shared these ideas with hundreds of corporate client managers — and now it’s time to share it with everyone.

    Step by step, here’s how you do it.

    If you ask us, if there WERE a Manager Tools Hall of Fame (HOF), this cast would be in it.

    https://www.manager-tools.com/2008/08/rolling-out-the-manager-tools-trinity-part-1

    —Huffduffed by keenanjim

  8. The Peer Feedback Model | Manager Tools

    Mark and Mike-

    I’m a great fan of

    Mark and Mike-

    I’m a great fan of your 4-step feedback model as well as an enthusiastic listener and promoter of your manager-tools project with my colleagues.

    As I listened to the peer feedback cast, I realized that I had intuitively been playing down step 4 when giving feedback to peers (haven’t tried on my boss yet - and not in a big hurry to do so, either). You managed to put words on the reason for this very well, Mike, with your driving analogy and the point about removing the control aspect that you would have with direct reports.

    I was a little surprised, however, that you dropped the first "asking" step from this model when adapting it for use with peers. In my experience, asking someone up front if they are ready for some feedback is such a great way of getting their attention. It also actually helps them prepare for processing the information you are about to share with them.

    I’d be very interested to hear if others have had different experiences on this.

    Thanks for the great work guys - keep it coming!

    Andrew

    http://www.manager-tools.com/2006/10/the-peer-feedback-model

    —Huffduffed by skiaec04

  9. The First Rule Of Probing In An Interview | Manager Tools

    This guidance describes the most important things to ask further questions about during an interview.

    Most interviews are terrible.

    And, we’re not talking about it from the perspective of the candidate, but rather the manager!

    Most of us really are not very good at all at interviewing.

    When you combine this weakness with what every Manager Tools manager knows - that interviewing is the most important thing managers do - well, that might just be a problem. :-)

    The question we get most frequently from managers is what questions should I ask?

    This is a fine question - and that’s why we have our Interview Creation Tool.

    But it’s not the best question.

    The best question is how do I evaluate their answers?

    Most of us do this poorly.

    Part of that happens because candidates are terrible at answering our questions.

    And, most of us don’t probe enough as they’re answering.

    One way to quickly get better at evaluating answers is to probe the decisions they make.

    But how?

    https://www.manager-tools.com/2012/01/first-rule-probing-interview

    —Huffduffed by irkman