Tagged with “travel” (62)

  1. Dumpling Diplomacy – Mouthy

    Original video: https://mouthypod.com/episode/ep-19-dumpling-diplomacy/
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Sat Mar 28 13:35:42 2020 Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by JeremyCherfas

  2. Intent-Based Leadership | Captain David Marquet | CMX Summit West 2015

    CMX Summit is the leading conference for community builders, bringing together the world’s most inspiring and experienced speakers on the topic of community strategy. It’s not just tech on stage. Experts from psychology, art, science, military, music and other fields come to CMX to share their unique perspectives on building communities.

    Whether you’re working to inject community into your organization, you want to hire a community professional, you want to network with the most awesome community professionals or just want to learn from some of the most inspiring speakers in the world, you don’t want to miss CMX Summit.

    —— David Marquet - Former Nuclear Submarine Captain & Author of Turn the Ship Around is produced for CMX Summit - CMX Summit - http://cmxsummit.com

    Related Videos: * http://youtu.be/M9xP7jYCCP0 * http://youtu.be/qC39BIzZhAk

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I5RkDDo6B9Y
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Sat, 03 Feb 2018 08:05:37 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by m

  3. The Trip: Episode 1: The Root of All Things

    Episode 1: The Root of All Things January 18, 2018

    A clear-eyed journey through the Amazon, hallucinogens, to sickness and back to health.

    http://roadsandkingdoms.com/the-trip-podcast/

    download

    Tagged with food travel

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Let’s Go Back to a Future Where Sci-Fi Does Good Time Travel | WIRED

    The concept of time travel is actually much newer than you might expect.

    https://www.wired.com/2017/02/geeks-guide-time-travel/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. 5by5 | Road Work #77: Hello, Sister

    John talks with Dan about mental illness.

    http://5by5.tv/roadwork/77

    —Huffduffed by m

  6. To The Best Of Our Knowledge: Time Travel

    Time plays such a big part in our lives, it’s no wonder we’re fascinated by the idea of escaping it. And what better way to escape it that to travel back into the past or forward into the future? This hour, we explore our obsession with time travel. Why is such a recurring them in movies and TV shows? And what can time travel teach us about ourselves?

    http://www.ttbook.org/book/time-travel

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. James Gleick: Time Travel - The Long Now

    Time travel is time research

    Gleick began with H.G. Wells’s 1895 book The Time Machine, which created the idea of time travel.

    It soon became a hugely popular genre that shows no sign of abating more than a century later.

    “Science fiction is a way of working out ideas,” Gleick said.

    Wells thought of himself as a futurist, and like many at the end of the 19th century he was riveted by the idea of progress, so his fictional traveler headed toward the far future.

    Other authors soon explored travel to the past and countless paradoxes ranging from squashed butterflies that change later elections to advising one’s younger self.

    Gleick invited audience members to query themselves: If you could travel in time, would you go to the future or to the past?

    When exactly, and where exactly?

    And why.

    And what is your second choice?

    (Try it, reader.)

    “We’re still trying to figure out what time is,” Gleick said.

    Time travel stories apparently help us.

    The inventor of the time machine in Wells’s book explains archly that time is merely a fourth dimension.

    Ten years later in 1905 Albert Einstein made that statement real.

    In 1941 Jorge Luis Borges wrote the celebrated short story, “The Garden of Forking Paths.”

    In 1955 physicist Hugh Everett introduced the quantum-based idea of forking universes, which itself has become a staple of science fiction.

    “Time,” Richard Feynman once joked, “is what happens when nothing else happens.”

    Gleick suggests, “Things change, and time is how we keep track.”

    Virginia Woolf wrote, “What more terrifying revelation can there be than that it is the present moment?

    That we survive the shock at all is only possible because the past shelters us on one side, the future on another.”

    To answer the last question of the evening, about how his views about time changed during the course of writing Time Travel, Gleick said:

    I thought I would conclude that the main thing to understand is: Enjoy the present.

    Don’t waste your brain cells agonizing about lost opportunities or worrying about what the future will bring.

    As I was working on the book I suddenly realized that that’s terrible advice.

    A potted plant lives in the now.

    The idea of the ‘long now’ embraces the past and the future and asks us to think about the whole stretch of time.

    That’s what I think time travel is good for.

    That’s what makes us human—the ability to live in the past and live in the future at the same time.

    —Stewart Brand

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02017/jun/05/time-travel/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. 50 Things That Made the Modern Economy: Passports

    How much might global economic output rise if anyone could work anywhere? Some economists have calculated it would double. By the turn of the 20th century only a handful of countries were still insisting on passports to enter or leave. Today, migrant controls are back in fashion. It can seem like a natural fact of life that the name of the country on our passport determines where you can travel and work – legally, at least.

    But it’s a relatively recent historical development – and, from a certain angle, an odd one. Many countries take pride in banning employers from discriminating against characteristics we can’t change: whether we’re male or female, young or old, gay or straight, black or white.

    It’s not entirely true that we can’t change our passport: if you’ve got $250,000, for example, you can buy one from St Kitts and Nevis. But mostly our passport depends on the identity of our parents and location of our birth. And nobody chooses those.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p052spyb

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. The Entrepreneurs: Eureka 43: Urbanito

    Eureka 43: Urbanito: Simon and Elaine MacKenzie are the husband-and-wife team behind new family-friendly city-guide brand Urbanito. While travelling with their children the Scottish duo discovered a lack of smart and stylish travel guides that catered to curious kids as well as their parents – so they decided to make one themselves. They share their story.

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  10. Josh Cohen in conversation with psychoanalyst James Mann

    Josh Cohen discusses his new book "The private life, why we remain in the dark" and psychoanalysis, Donald Trump and more

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LM7gBxtk6mI
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Sat, 01 Apr 2017 14:23:55 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by m

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