chrisaldrich / collective / tags / psychology

Tagged with “psychology” (107)

  1. Covid-19: the psychology of conspiracy theories | Science | The Guardian

    Ian Sample speaks to social psychologist Dr Daniel Jolley about why the global coronavirus pandemic is fertile ground for conspiracy theories

    https://www.theguardian.com/science/audio/2020/may/05/covid-19-the-psychology-of-conspiracy-theories

    —Huffduffed by kevinpacheco

  2. An Unfinished Lesson: What The 1918 Flu Tells Us About Human Nature

    It’s easy to stare out your window at the nearly empty streets, at the people wearing masks and leaving a six-foot berth for passersby, and to believe that this is a moment unlike any other. To assume that the fear, the haphazard responses to the pandemic, the radical adjustments people are making to their lives—that these are all unprecedented.

    But like most extraordinary moments, this one has a long trail that leads to it. Just over a century ago, a new infectious disease overtook the globe. Its history has long been buried, subsumed beneath the story of World War I. Historian Nancy Bristow believes it’s no mistake that Americans have focused on their victory in the war rather than on the devastation of the 1918 flu pandemic.

    https://www.npr.org/2020/03/23/820066211/an-unfinished-lesson-what-the-1918-flu-tells-us-about-human-nature

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Tali Sharot: The optimism bias | TED Talk

    Are we born to be optimistic, rather than realistic? Tali Sharot shares new research that suggests our brains are wired to look on the bright side — and how that can be both dangerous and beneficial.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/tali_sharot_the_optimism_bias?referrer=playlist-why_we_do_the_things_we_do

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. YANSS 077 – The Conjunction Fallacy – You Are Not So Smart

    Here is a logic puzzle created by psychologists Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky. "Linda is single, outspoken, and very bright. She majored in philosophy. As a student, she was deeply concerned with the issue of discrimination and social justice, and also participated in demonstrations. Which of the following is more probable: Linda is a bank…

    https://youarenotsosmart.com/2016/06/16/yanss-077-the-conjunction-fallacy/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. YANSS 071 – The Texas Sharpshooter Fallacy – You Are Not So Smart

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y_3CsKoXwfA When you desire meaning, when you want things to line up, when looking for something specific, you tend to notice patterns everywhere, which leads you to ask the question, "What are the odds?" Usually, the odds are actually pretty good. For instance: Does the Bermuda Triangle seem quite as mysterious once you know that…

    https://youarenotsosmart.com/2016/03/23/yanss-071-the-texas-sharpshooter-fallacy/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. YANSS 166 – The psychological phenomena that mask our progress when we attempt to change the world for the better – You Are Not So Smart

    In this episode we explore prevalence induced concept change with psychologist David Levari. In a nutshell, when we set out to change the world by reducing examples of something we have deemed problematic, and we succeed, a host of psychological phenomena can mask our progress and make those problems seem intractable — as if we…

    https://youarenotsosmart.com/2019/11/20/yanss-166-the-psychological-phenomena-that-mask-our-progress-when-we-attempt-to-change-the-world-for-the-better/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. YANSS 065 – Survivorship Bias (rebroadcast) – You Are Not So Smart

    The problem with sorting out failures and successes is that failures are often muted, destroyed, or somehow removed from sight while successes are left behind, weighting your decisions and perceptions, tilting your view of the world. That means to be successful you must learn how to seek out what is missing. You must learn what…

    https://youarenotsosmart.com/2016/01/02/yanss-065-survivorship-bias-rebroadcast/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. YANSS 133 – How politics became our identity – You Are Not So Smart

    Dinner parties used to be where you avoided politics. Now talking about politics at dinner parties is the norm.

    Years ago, we avoided politics because we assumed the people at our table had diverse political identities, and we didn’t want to introduce a topic that might lead to an argument. Today, we assume our guests share a single identity, after all, why else would we have invited them?

    Something has changed in the United States, and for many of us, it’s only at Thanksgiving dinner, a gathering where we don’t get to sort ourselves by political tribe, that we must face people who see the world differently than ourselves.

    https://youarenotsosmart.com/2018/08/04/yanss-133-how-politics-became-our-identity/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Bonus Episode: What’s It Like To Have No Mind’s Eye? – Research Digest

    Ella Rhodes, journalist for The Psychologist magazine, delves into the growing body of research exploring aphantasia – a condition she has personal experience of. While most people can see images formed in their minds, people with aphantasia draw a blank – what might this mean for autobiographical memory, face perception and imagination?

    https://digest.bps.org.uk/2019/05/03/bonus-episode-whats-it-like-to-have-no-minds-eye/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Crony Beliefs

    For as long as I can remember, I’ve struggled to make sense of the terrifying gulf that separates the inside and outside views of beliefs.

    From the inside, via introspection, each of us feels that our beliefs are pretty damn sensible. Sure we might harbor a bit of doubt here and there. But for the most part, we imagine we have a firm grip on reality; we don’t lie awake at night fearing that we’re massively deluded.

    But when we consider the beliefs of other people? It’s an epistemic shit show out there. Astrology, conspiracies, the healing power of crystals. Aliens who abduct Earthlings and build pyramids. That vaccines cause autism or that Obama is a crypto-Muslim — or that the world was formed some 6,000 years ago, replete with fossils made to look millions of years old. How could anyone believe this stuff?!

    No, seriously: how?

    http://secondenumerations.blogspot.com/2017/04/episode-10-crony-beliefs.html

    —Huffduffed by adactio

Page 1 of 11Older