Antibiotics and agriculture

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  1. Fresh Air: ‘Big Chicken,’ Antibiotics & Modern Agriculture

    In her new book, ‘Big Chicken,’ health journalist Maryn McKenna explores how many of the chickens consumed in the U.S. have been fed antibiotics, which can lead to serious infections in humans. Film critic Justin Chang reviews ‘Last Flag Flying.’

    http://freshairnpr.npr.libsynfusion.com/big-chicken-antibiotics-modern-agriculture

    —Huffduffed by zadeus

  2. Antibiotics in Beef

    How much truth is there to claims of risk caused by the treatment of beef cattle with antibiotics?

    Nobody wants to eat beef containing antibiotics, but there’s a ton of misinformation out there on this controversial practice.

    Some people think that beef we get from these cows contains antibiotics. This has never been true. Antibiotics are quickly metabolized by the body. This is why when you take antibiotics, you have to take them every day. Each drug has an established “withdrawal time” which is anywhere from 0 to 60 days, during which treated animals cannot go into food production. This is verified by the US Food Safety and Inspection Service, the FDA, and the EPA.

    Some retailers market their beef as containing no antibiotics. This is deceptive, because no beef on the market contains antibiotics. In advertising they call this a “preemptive claim”, saying something about your product that’s also true of all similar products, in the hope that pointing it out will frighten consumers away from the competition. Don’t be fooled by deceptive marketing.

    The real concern is that using antibiotics in any species eventually evolves resistant bacteria. If such bacteria are in the meat and we eat it without properly cooking it, then it’s possible for those resistant bacteria to transfer to us humans. Therefore, about 85% of ranchers in the United States follow the Beef Q…

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JPwHPynNJ_A
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    Tagged with education

    —Huffduffed by farmerchris

  3. The future of food: can we eat our way out of total confusion?

    Has food been replaced by nutrients; and common sense by confusion? Once upon a time we ate food. Now we eat nutrients, embedded in food-like substances, like yoghurt fortified with omega-3 or bread rolls infused with anti-oxidants. Are foods like carrots, broccoli and chicken better for you before or after they take a trip to the food processing plant? Do we need more nutrients in our diet or is it all getting out of hand? And are scientists to blame for all this confusion? ABC´s Paul Willis hosts this lively public forum with: Michael Pollan, a food writer and professor of journalism at the University of California Berkeley and author of In Defence of Food; Professor Mark Adams, dean of agriculture, University of Sydney, an expert in sustainable agriculture; Dr Ingrid Appelqvist, team leader for the CSIRO´s designed food research program.

    http://www.abc.net.au/rn/bigideas/stories/2009/2448999.htm

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  4. The future of food: can we eat our way out of total confusion?

    Has food been replaced by nutrients; and common sense by confusion? Once upon a time we ate food. Now we eat nutrients, embedded in food-like substances, like yoghurt fortified with omega-3 or bread rolls infused with anti-oxidants. Are foods like carrots, broccoli and chicken better for you before or after they take a trip to the food processing plant? Do we need more nutrients in our diet or is it all getting out of hand? And are scientists to blame for all this confusion? ABC´s Paul Willis hosts this lively public forum with: Michael Pollan, a food writer and professor of journalism at the University of California Berkeley and author of In Defence of Food; Professor Mark Adams, dean of agriculture, University of Sydney, an expert in sustainable agriculture; Dr Ingrid Appelqvist, team leader for the CSIRO´s designed food research program.

    http://www.abc.net.au/rn/bigideas/stories/2009/2448999.htm

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Eat This Podcast: Bread as it ought to be

    Jonathan Bethony is one of the leading artisanal bakers in America, but he goes further than most, milling his own flour and baking everything with a hundred percent of the whole grain. He’s also going beyond wheat, incorporating other cereals such as millet and sorghum in the goodies Seylou is producing.

    https://www.eatthispodcast.com/bread-as-it-ought-to-be/

    —Huffduffed by chrisaldrich

  6. After Italy Quakes, Food World Delivers Support To Home Of Famous Pasta Dish : NPR

    Amatrice was set to host the 50th celebration of pasta all’Amatriciana famously made there, but this week’s earthquake devastated the town. NPR’s Scott Simon speaks with food blogger Jeremy Cherfas.

    http://www.npr.org/2016/08/27/491613504/after-italy-quakes-food-world-delivers-support-to-home-of-famous-pasta-dish

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    Tagged with scott simon

    —Huffduffed by abrin

  7. Michael Pollan, “Deep Agriculture”

    The benefit of a reformed food system, besides better food, better environment and less climate shock, is better health and the savings of trillions of dollars. Four out of five chronic diseases are diet-related. Three quarters of medical spending goes to preventable chronic disease. Pollan says we cannot have a healthy population, without a healthy diet. The news is that we are learning that we cannot have a healthy diet without a healthy agriculture. And right now, farming is sick…

    http://blog.longnow.org/2009/05/06/michael-pollan-deep-agriculture/

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  8. RRP 129 • VANI HARI

    Ultra-athlete & #1 bestselling author Rich Roll talks with the Food Babe, Vani Hari about consumer activism, government oversight and corporate resposnsibility

    http://www.richroll.com/podcast/how-we-can-change-the-food-industry-with-food-babe-activist-vani-hari-rrp-129/

    —Huffduffed by nightshowerer

  9. Sizing Up Sustainable Food

    These days some shoppers are looking at more than the price of their groceries; they’re also considering "food miles" — how far the grapes or pork chops traveled to get to the store. But some experts say eating food grown locally isn’t necessarily the best way to go green at the grocery store.

    —Huffduffed by Wordridden

  10. Sizing Up Sustainable Food

    These days some shoppers are looking at more than the price of their groceries; they’re also considering "food miles" — how far the grapes or pork chops traveled to get to the store. But some experts say eating food grown locally isn’t necessarily the best way to go green at the grocery store.

    —Huffduffed by adactio