Materialising and Dematerialising A Web of Data. (Or What We’ve Learned From Printing The Internet Out)

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  1. Designing the future - Tech Weekly podcast

    We may not have jetpacks and flying cars, but artificial intelligence is taking ever greater strides.

    This week on the podcast we look one day into the future at some of the biggest technological designs of the next few years set to beam out of this year’s dConstruct Conference, part of the Brighton Digital festival.

    Joining Alex Hern on the panel is time traveller Ingrid Burrington who argues that the time machines of today don’t look like Deloreans, they look like NTP servers, real-time data streams and predictive models, Nick Foster an industrial designer working on future projects for google and Carla Diana who thinks that the robot takeover will start in our kitchens.

    http://www.theguardian.com/technology/audio/2015/sep/10/design-future-dconstruct-conference-brighton-tech-podcast

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. On The Media: Transcript of “Panoramic View” (April 16, 2010)

    Writer Dave Eggers’ publishing house, McSweeney’s, recently released a one-off newspaper called Panorama. The 328-page paper was meant as a celebration of the print form and a demonstration of why newspapers are still uniquely relevant in the digital era. Brooke interviewed Dave live onstage in Washington DC, and asked him about the future of print.

    —Huffduffed by fjordaan

  3. Pocket Scale

    I punch in a keycode and enter the office. Three steps through the door I swipe my travelcard against an old wooden box, which starts spitting out a radio station based on forty million people’s answer to the question ‘What songs would a Joy Division fan like?’ The sexyfuture arrived yesterday, and it colonised my pockets.

    Even on the days you leave your phone at home, you carry enough hacked objects to unlock space and time, provided you find the right door. What should we be thinking about as we bring our products to life? What are we strapping to our keyrings? And what does all of this mean for a scale we’ve been familiar with for centuries?

    Matthew will empty his pockets live at dConstruct to find out, revealing the five things he’s carrying around with him in Brighton and why.

    http://2011.dconstruct.org/conference/matthew-sheret

    Writer and editor Matthew Sheret is Last.fm’s Data Griot, using everything from tweets to radio scripts to tell stories about Last.fm’s numbers.

    He has worked for the likes of Newspaper Club, 4iP, Thomson Reuters and Dentsu London and in 2008 co-founded We Are Words Pictures, an ad-hoc team of comic book creators who promote the work of up-and-coming creators.

    In his spare time he edits and publishes the anthology Paper Science and plays with Lego.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  4. Media Futures (1 of 4) - Newspapers | BBC World Service - The Documentary,

    With more news now available online does the internet spell doom for the daily newspaper?

    As more and more news is available online, the idea of buying a traditional newspaper is fast becoming a thing of the past. Or is it? Some parts of the world are still enjoying strong print circulation. And even places like the west where newspaper sales are plummeting, it has often proved difficult to make the digital alternative pay its way. In part one of this four-part series, Mark Coles asks what is the future for newspapers? And if they survive, how will they need to change?

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0199y2s http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0199y26

    —Huffduffed by grankabeza

  5. Oh God, It’s Full of Stars

    The relationship between digital and physical products is larger than if it exists on a hard drive or a shelf. It’s the tension between access and ownership, searching and finding, sharing and collecting. It’s a dance between the visible and the invisible, and what happens when we’re forced to remember versus when we are allowed to forget. How does this affect us—not just as makers, but as consumers of these products? Does collecting things matter if we don’t revisit them? We may download, bookmark, tag, organize, and star, but what then?

    A digital Zen master would say that if everything is starred, nothing is. We’ve optimized the system for getting things in, but how do we get something good out? How can we make meaningful connections between all of this stuff, and make constellations out of all these stars?

    http://2011.dconstruct.org/conference/frank-chimero

    Frank Chimero is a graphic designer and illustrator. He makes pictures about words and words about pictures. His fascination with the creative process, curiosity, and visual experience informs all of his work. Each piece is part of an exploration in finding wit, surprise, and joy in the world around us, then, trying to document those things with all deliberate speed.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  6. BBC: Click — Brighton Digital Festival

    How digital technology affects our lives around the world.

    Gareth Mitchell and Bill Thompson travel to the south coast of England for the first ever Brighton Digital Festival. It is an event that brings together hackers, digital artists and technophiles to explore the realms of digital technology. Hackers from a Mini Maker Faire demonstrate how they have repurposed various bits of old gadgetry. Click also hears from Honor Harger one of the organisers of the festival about the big questions that are being posed about our information society and where it is all going. Aral Balkan from Update joins the discussion to reflect on how companies need to make the various gadgets and digital tools more attractive for us to use. And there is a report on the plethora of digital art at the festival including the internationally renowned Blast Theory and Katy Connor’s Pure Flow.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/digitalp

    —Huffduffed by adactio