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Huffduffed (121)

  1. Representing the reprehensible: Australian criminal lawyer Andrew Boe | RNZ

    How tough would it be to defend a nationalist politician whose views would see you and your family deported from the country they now call home? Australian criminal lawyer Andrew Boe arrived in Queensland from Burma- now Myanmar- with his parents as a child. He’s risen to become one of Australia’s top barristers, and in his book The Truth Hurts he reflects on his three decades in the law, some previous clients (including serial killer Ivan Milat and right wing politician Pauline Hanson) and what is wrong with Australia’s criminal justice system. With an increasing interest in indigenous issues and a track record of representing some of the most vulnerable people in society, as well as some of the most notorious and privileged too, he sees that not everyone is treated equally in the eyes of the law.

    https://www.rnz.co.nz/national/programmes/saturday/audio/2018764730/representing-the-reprehensible-australian-criminal-lawyer-andrew-boe

    —Huffduffed by cato

  2. David Farrier: examining conspiracy culture in New Zealand

    Donald Trump made a smart political move when he redefined ‘fake news’ as a term to discredit any mainstream media content, says journalist David Farrier. Now he’s no longer POTUS, and we’re stuck with the fallout.

    "We’ve got to the system now where you can kind of create your own reality. If you’re unhappy with how your life is and what you see around you and you feel stressed out, you can point to a big bad [entity of some kind]… and that’s the reality that explains the world you’re in."

    —Huffduffed by cato

  3. The 1989 CBC Massey Lectures, “The Real World of Technology”, Part 4

    Technology has always been a part of human existence. Today though, says the experimental physicist, Ursula M. Franklin, technology has large-scale effects on culture itself. Ursula Franklin is an experimental physicist, University Professor Emeritus at the University of Toronto, a former board member of the National Research Council and the Science Council of Canada, and a companion of the Order…

    http://www.cbc.ca/radio/ideas/the-1989-cbc-massey-lectures-the-real-world-of-technology-1.2946845

    —Huffduffed by cato

  4. The 1989 CBC Massey Lectures, “The Real World of Technology”, Part 3

    Technology has always been a part of human existence. Today though, says the experimental physicist, Ursula M. Franklin, technology has large-scale effects on culture itself. Ursula Franklin is an experimental physicist, University Professor Emeritus at the University of Toronto, a former board member of the National Research Council and the Science Council of Canada, and a companion of the Order…

    http://www.cbc.ca/radio/ideas/the-1989-cbc-massey-lectures-the-real-world-of-technology-1.2946845

    —Huffduffed by cato

  5. The 1989 CBC Massey Lectures, “The Real World of Technology” - Home, Part 2

    Technology has always been a part of human existence. Today though, says the experimental physicist, Ursula M. Franklin, technology has large-scale effects on culture itself. Ursula Franklin is an experimental physicist, University Professor Emeritus at the University of Toronto, a former board member of the National Research Council and the Science Council of Canada, and a companion of the Order…

    http://www.cbc.ca/radio/ideas/the-1989-cbc-massey-lectures-the-real-world-of-technology-1.2946845

    —Huffduffed by cato

  6. The 1989 CBC Massey Lectures, “The Real World of Technology”, Part 1

    Technology has always been a part of human existence. Today though, says the experimental physicist, Ursula M. Franklin, technology has large-scale effects on culture itself. Ursula Franklin is an experimental physicist, University Professor Emeritus at the University of Toronto, a former board member of the National Research Council and the Science Council of Canada, and a companion of the Order…

    http://www.cbc.ca/radio/ideas/the-1989-cbc-massey-lectures-the-real-world-of-technology-1.2946845

    —Huffduffed by cato

  7. RNZ - Extra Time

    In Extra Time this week - Sideline violence and abuse continues on New Zealand’s sporting fields and it appears there is nothing in place to stop it.

    The panel discusses the issue of clubs and teams taking responsibility for the actions of those playing and watching.

    The New Zealand Rugby Players Association has come up with an alternative plan to the propsed sale of part of New Zealand Rugby commercial arm to a foreign investor, but is the game’s governing body interested.

    And more and more of our top women’s sports stars are suffering from mental fatigue and are taking time away from their sport…. are they getting the necessary support?

    Join Barry Guy on RNZ Sport’s Extra Time.

    —Huffduffed by cato

  8. Death, mana and Peter Ellis: lawyer Natalie Coates

    New Zealand legal history was made earlier this month when the Supreme Court allowed former Christchurch Civic Creche worker Peter Ellis’s appeal against charges of sexual offending to continue, despite the fact he died in September last year.

    It will be the first time in Aotearoa that a conviction is appealed by a dead person.

    Ellis’ lawyer Natalie Coates spoke to Saturday Morning about the case and the cultural significance of the precedent.

    —Huffduffed by cato

  9. Televised school sport - great exposure, or breeding elitism

    The move to televise school sport is being called ‘catastrophic’ for the future of New Zealand sport in the community, by the journalist investigating it.

    But NZME’s Dylan Cleaver says it’s not too late to stop it.

    Today The Detail looks at the uproar over the move, and the complicated mix of players clashing over who owns school sport.

    —Huffduffed by cato

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