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Huffduffed (67)

  1. Neil DeGrasse Tyson Separates Fact From Fiction In ‘Interstellar’ : NPR

    The astrophysicist has been tweeting about the science behind the film. In an interview with NPR, Tyson goes beyond those tweets, into wormholes, relativity and even some spoilers.

    http://www.npr.org/2014/11/14/363798836/neil-degrasse-tyson-separates-fact-from-fiction-in-interstellar

    —Huffduffed by cato

  2. “Is Our Universe a Simulation?” with Brian Greene

    Neil deGrasse Tyson investigates the nature of reality, from quantum physics and string theory, to the multiverse and “The Matrix.” With theoretical physicists Brian Greene and Stephon Alexander, philosopher David Chalmers, co-host Maeve Higgins, Chuck Nice and Bill Nye.

    —Huffduffed by cato

  3. Designer Notes 23: Sid Meier - Part 1

    In this episode, Soren Johnson interviews legendary game designer Sid Meier, best known for designing Pirates!, Railroad Tycoon, and Civilization. They discuss using the Ayatollah Khomeini as an enemy, how Strike Eagle differentiated itself from Flight Simulator, and why the torpedo doesn’t go where the player aims it in Silent Spring.

    —Huffduffed by cato

  4. 1. Vernon Fowler

    The first UXLibs podcast in which Vernon Fowler, Digital Library UX Specialist at Deakin University Melbourne, Australia, talks about his current projects, co-design, what he’s been reading recently and the importance of buy-in for UX work.

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/uxlibs/1-vernon-fowler
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Mon, 08 May 2017 10:48:52 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by cato

  5. Strategic Code Deletion

    Michael Feathers describes techniques that generate more certainty around assessments of feature liveness, and strategies that can be used to remove code that does not have high value

    https://www.infoq.com/presentations/remove-unneeded-code

    —Huffduffed by cato

  6. The Digital Human: Haunted

    Aleks Krotoski asks if we are haunted by our technology, or are we haunting it?

    So much of our experience of technology can feel a bit like being haunted. It starts like any good ghost story with the just mildly unsettling; things aren’t were you left them or seem to have moved on their own within our devices. Its a creepy feeling that leaves you unsure about what to believe. Our understanding of how much of technology works is so limited that when it starts to behave out of the ordinary we have no explanation. This is when we start to make very peculiar judgement’s; "why did you do that" we plead, as if some hidden force was at work.

    For some these feelings of being haunted by our technology can develop into full blown apparitions; keen gamers frequently experience Game transfer Phenomena where they literally see images of their game play in the real world, an involuntary augmented reality. While the hallucinations aren’t necessarily distressing in themselves the experiences can leave individuals questioning their sanity.

    The coming internet of things will bring problems of its own; smart locks that mysteriously open by themselves for example as if under the influence of some poltergeist. Aleks herself has had the experience of digital ‘gas lighting’ (a term drawn from an Ingrid Bergman movie of a woman being driven mad by husband) when her partner logged on to their home automation system remotely and started to mess with the lights while Aleks was home alone. As one commentator puts it in a reworking of the old Arthur C. Clarke quote "any sufficiently advanced hacking is indistinguishable from haunting."

    And as our devices and appliances increasingly start talking to each other bypassing us altogether who’s to say we, like Nicole Kidman’s character in The Others, haven’t become the ghost in the machine.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b080t0p9

    —Huffduffed by cato

  7. How technology gets us hooked – podcast | News | The Guardian

    From a young age, humans love to press buttons that light up and make a noise. The thrill of positive feedback lies at the heart of addiction to gambling, games and social media

    https://www.theguardian.com/news/audio/2017/mar/14/how-technology-gets-us-hooked-podcast

    —Huffduffed by cato

  8. Brian Greene — Reimagining the Cosmos

    A thrilling, mind-bending view of the cosmos and of the human adventure of modern science. In a conversation ranging from free will to the multiverse to the meaning of the Higgs boson particle, physicist Brian Greene suggests the deepest scientific realities are hidden from human senses and often defy our best intuition.

    —Huffduffed by cato

  9. Bob Dylan - Nobel Lecture

    © THE NOBEL FOUNDATION 2017 The Nobel Foundation has not obtained the right to assign any usage right to the Nobel Lecture to any third party, and any such rights may thus not be granted. All rights to the Nobel Lecture by Bob Dylan are reserved and the Nobel Lecture may not be published or otherwise used by third parties with one exception: the audio file containing the Nobel Lecture, as published at Nobelprize.org, the official website of the Nobel Prize, may be embedded on other websites.

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/nobelprize/bob-dylan-nobel-lecture
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Wed, 07 Jun 2017 10:41:20 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by cato

  10. Sarah Kenderdine - Cultural heritage in the age of experience

    Professor Sarah Kenderdine is a New Zealander at the forefront of interactive and emersive experiences for galleries, libraries, archives, museums, and increasingly, some of the world’s most precious heritage sites. She is the founding director of the trans-disciplinary Expanded Perception and Interaction Centre, at the University of New South Wales Art and Design.

    —Huffduffed by cato

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