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Huffduffed (82)

  1. Built to Scale: Why “Pause” for a Design System?

    Design that doesn’t scale well hurts—it’s a short-term approach impacting product sprints and ability to ship quickly. Design systems offer a magic solution, but the pause in engineering resource is not easy to justify. They’re not just about pretty buttons—they’re about speed-to-fixability that ensures silo’ed bugs don’t sink your UX. Hear from (+ learn from the mistakes of) the Airbnb, Eventbrite & Pinterest folks involved in selling in of concept, proof of value, & successful creation of a DS.

    —Huffduffed by cato

  2. Breaking down design systems to atomic elements (w/ Brad Frost, Atomic Design)

    We are honored to have with us today, the inspiring Brad Frost – Founder and inventor of the “Atomic Design” system.

    Brad started out as a web designer. Started at agency work, then got into doing client work, started a shop, and eventually started consulting for teams, doing workshops, writing a blog and hosting a podcast.

    Besides being a web designer, a developer, an author and a podcast host, Brad’s background as a musician also connect with his work.

    In this episode, Brad shared his thoughts and insights about how to build a design system, collaborate better, and how to implement that state of mind into your organization.

    This is the sixth episode of the third season of the Hacking UI podcast – ‘Scaling a Career’.

    In this season we have 10 amazing guests for you, who are leaders and influencers from a variety of different backgrounds. Design managers, development leaders, entrepreneurs and product geniuses that we admire, and we’ll be sharing a new episode every Thursday.

    —Huffduffed by cato

  3. Christopher Steele, the Man Behind the Trump Dossier | The New Yorker

    How the ex-spy tried to warn the world about Trump’s ties to Russia.

    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2018/03/12/christopher-steele-the-man-behind-the-trump-dossier

    —Huffduffed by cato

  4. What should developers know about online privacy

    Laura Kalbag explains how tracking tools work and how we as developers should approach online privacy when building our own products.

    —Huffduffed by cato

  5. 047: The Web is Neither Good or Bad…nor is it Neutral. It’s an Amplifier with Jeremy Keith – User Defenders podcast : Inspiring Interviews with UX Superheroes.

    Jeremy Keith reveals how the web is neither good or bad, nor neutral, but an amplifier. He inspires us to not let the future be just something that happens to us, but rather something we make with the small things we do today. He encourages us to build software ethically with our users’ psychological vulnerabilities in mind. He motivates us to not build on rented land, but to publish using the superpower of our own URLs. He also shows us how looking to the past is just as important as looking to the future.

    Jeremy Keith lives in Brighton, England where he makes websites with the splendid design agency Clearleft. You may know him from such books as DOM Scripting, Bulletproof Ajax, HTML5 For Web Designers, and most recently Resilient Web Design. He curated the dConstruct conference for a number of years as well as Brighton SF, and he organised the world’s first Science Hack Day. He also made the website Huffduffer to allow people to make podcasts of found sounds—it’s like Instapaper for audio files. Hailing from Erin’s green shores, Jeremy maintains his link to Irish traditional music running the community site The Session. He also indulges a darker side of his bouzouki-playing in the band Salter Cane. Jeremy spends most of his time goofing off on the internet, documenting his time-wasting on adactio.com, where he has been writing for over fifteen years. A photograph he took appears in the film Iron Man.

    Iron Man Photo Story (4:43)

    On Net Neutrality (13:31)

    What’s “Adactio”? (20:44)

    Is the Internet Good or Evil? (24:41)

    Hippocratic Oath for Software Designers (35:51)

    Resilient Web Design (49:06)

    Why do you Love the Web so Much? (54:26)

    The Power and Generosity of the Community (63:05)

    What Comes Next? (71:34)

    Listener Question? (73:44)

    Last Words to the Builders of the Web (74:18)

    Contact Info (80:15)

    https://userdefenders.com/podcast/047-the-web-is-neither-good-or-bad-nor-is-it-neutral-its-an-amplifier-with-jeremy-keith/

    —Huffduffed by cato

  6. EP#112 – RICKY GERVAIS RETURNS – HUMANITY

    This week on The #GSPodcast Stephen Knight (@Gspellchecker) welcomes the return of comedian Ricky Gervais (@RickyGervais). Ricky’s new stand-up ‘Humanity’ comes to Netflix on March 13th. He talks about how he approaches his craft, causing offence, social media, animal rights, American politics and much, much more!

    —Huffduffed by cato

  7. Hypertext as an Agent of Change

    Thomas Pynchon. The Anthropocene. Ferguson. Geoheliocentrism. Teju Cole. Thomas Kuhn’s theory of paradigms. Antigone. A wall. The sixth extinction.

    The ways we transmit information—and the ways in which that information accumulates into narratives—is changing. And if we aren’t careful, it may not change in all the ways we want it to.

    http://2014.dconstruct.org/conference/mandybrown/

    Mandy Brown is a wordsmith. She takes other people’s words and hammers them into shape.

    Mandy edited Frank Chimero’s The Shape Of Design. She has edited articles for A List Apart and books for A Book Apart (including the particularly handsome first book).

    More recently, Mandy assembled a dream team to work on her startup Editorially, an online platform for collaborative writing and editing. That didn’t work out in the end, which is a shame because it was a lovely piece of work.

    Before that, Mandy worked as product lead at Typekit, whipping their communications into shape.

    She is one of the Studiomates crew in Brooklyn, where she lives with her husband, Keith and her dog, Jax. They’re both adorable.

    —Huffduffed by cato

  8. Episode 6: Designing the Future

    How do you design the future? Today we talk with cyberpunk founder and design theorist Bruce Sterling and feminist/activist writer Jasmina Tešanović about speculative design, design fictions, open source hardware, the maker movement, and the soft robots of our domestic future. Plus we go behind the scenes of the creation of a design fiction by Bruce, Jasmina, Sheldon Brown, and the Clarke Center—a video installation called My Elegant Robot Freedom.

    http://imagination.ucsd.edu/_wp/podcast/episode-6-designing-the-future/

    —Huffduffed by cato

  9. Jason Fried on Jobs-to-be-Done Radio

    *This post has been updated to an article format.  See the update here at: Jason Fried on using JTBD at Basecamp   This week Jason Fried, the founder of 37signals and author of Rework, joins us on Jobs-to-be-Done Radio to discuss … Read More

    http://jobstobedone.org/radio/jason-fried-on-jobs-to-be-done-radio/

    —Huffduffed by cato

  10. Heat Rocks, EP 13: Jay Smooth on Run DMC’s “Raising Hell” (1986) | Maximum Fun

    Show: 

    Heat Rocks

    Guests: 

    Jay Smooth

    The album: Run DMC: Raising Hell (Profile, 1986)

     

    Jay Smooth was always on our list of "people who we gotta get for Heat Rocks." His cultural and political commentary, much of which he does through his pioneering Ill Doctrine videos, have positioned him as one of the hip-hop generation’s leading pundits and he’s also hosted one of the longest running rap shows in the world: The Underground Railroad on WBAI.

    For this show, Jay wanted to revisit Raising Hell a paradigm-shifting rap album that, as we discuss, has seemingly become underrated through the passage of time though it is unquestionably one of the most important hip-hop releases, ever. We get into the moment in which Run DMC first arrived, how they changed the game for rap artists (for better and for worse) and of course, all our fire track and sleeper jam picks off this LP.

    More on Run DMC’s Raising Hell

    Mark Coleman’s original review in Rolling Stone from 1986.

    John Freeman’s revisit review on the album’s 30th anniversary in Quietus.

    Chaz Kangas’ celebration of Raising Hell’s album cuts.

    More on Jay Smooth

    The Ill Doctrine video series.

    His interview on The Cipher podcast.

    Twitter | Youtube

    Show Tracklisting (all songs from Raising Hell unless indicated otherwise):

    Walk This Way

    Run DMC: Sucker MCs

    Run DMC: It’s Like That

    Raising Hell

    Eric B. and Rakim: I Ain’t No Joke

    It’s Tricky

    Peter Piper

    Bob James: Mardi Gras

    Dumb Girl

    Is It Live?

    My Adidas

    Proud to Be Black

    You Be Illin’

    NWA: Straight Outta Compton

    Run DMC: Tougher Than Leather

    Aretha Franklin: I Never Loved a Man

    Jay-Z: Jockin’ Jay-Z

    If you’re not already subscribed to Heat Rocks in Apple Podcasts, do it here!

    http://maximumfun.org/heat-rocks/heat-rocks-ep-11-jay-smooth-run-dmcs-raising-hell-1986

    —Huffduffed by cato

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