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Tagged with “technology” (67)

  1. Marcus du Sautoy and James Bridle – books podcast

    On this week’s show, we’re exploring infinity and beyond with artist and writer James Bridle and mathematician Marcus du Sautoy.

    Through his visual art and writings on technology and culture, James Bridle has been at the forefront of our understanding of tech for the last decade – and from his perspective, the view of our future is both exciting and gloomy. He sat down with the Guardian’s technology reporter Alex Hern to talk about his book, New Dark Age.

    Limits are grist to the mill for Marcus du Sautoy, professor of public understanding of science at Oxford University. His mission is to explore – and if possible, explain – the unknown, so following hot on the heels of his bestselling book What We Cannot Know, is How to Count to Infinity. Meeting with Richard Lea at the Hay festival, Du Sautoy explained how a German mathematician first proved the existence of infinity in 1874, and what the concept means for our understanding of the universe.

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  2. A Conversation with Nate Silver: Analytic Evolutions, Big Data Failures and Data Visualizations

    In this interview, SAS’ data-driven marketer Alex Krawchick sits down with celebrity statistician, author and New York Times blogger Nate Silver. They discuss where analytics is heading, how organizations are succeeding - and failing - with big data, and how data visualization is changing the game. Learn more at http://www.sas.com/visualanalytics

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GHU2wU_kUC8
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  3. Debate: Is Smart Technology Making Us Dumb?

    We’ve come a long way since 1975, when a newspaper in Midland, Texas, featured an advertisement about a personal pocket computer wizard that had the broad mathematical abilities of a slide rule: a Sharp calculator.

    But, are we smarter now that technology has put a lot more than a slide rule into our pockets? Or are we so dependent on technology to do things for us that we are losing the ability to make our own magic, mentally, socially and politically?

    Two teams faced off over these questions in the latest event from Intelligence Squared U.S., debating the motion: "Smart Technology is Making us Dumb." In these Oxford-style debates, the team that sways the most people to its side by the end is the winner.

    Before the debate, 37 percent of the audience at the Kaufman Music Center in New York voted in favor of the motion, while 33 percent were opposed and 30 percent were undecided. After the event, 47 percent agreed with the motion and 43 percent disagreed, and 10 percent were undecided, making it the first tied debate.

    THOSE DEBATING

    Genevieve Bell, an anthropologist and vice president at Intel Corp., with teammate David Weinberger, senior Researcher at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University.i Genevieve Bell, an anthropologist and vice president at Intel Corp., with teammate David Weinberger, senior Researcher at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University. Samuel LaHoz/Intelligence Squared U.S. For The Motion

    Nicholas Carr writes about technology and culture. He is the author of the acclaimed new book The Glass Cage: Automation and Us (2014), which examines the personal and social consequences of our ever growing dependency on computers. His previous work, The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains (2011), was a Pulitzer Prize finalist and a New York Times bestseller. A former columnist for the Guardian, Carr writes the popular blog Rough Type, and has written for The Atlantic, Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Wired, Nature, MIT Technology Review, and other periodicals. His essays, including "Is Google Making Us Stupid?" and "The Great Forgetting," have been collected in several anthologies. Previously, Carr was executive editor of the Harvard Business Review, as well as a member of the Encyclopedia Britannica’s editorial board of advisors and the steering board of the World Economic Forum’s cloud computing project.

    Andrew Keen is an Internet entrepreneur and the author of three books: The Internet Is Not the Answer (2015), Digital Vertigo: How Today’s Social Revolution Is Dividing, Diminishing and Disorienting Us (2012), and Cult of the Amateur: How The Internet Is Killing Our Culture (2007). In 1995, he founded Audiocafe.com and built it into a popular first-generation Internet company. Keen is currently the executive director of the Silicon Valley salon FutureCast, a senior fellow at CALinnovates, the host of the "Keen On" Techonomy chat show, and a columnist for CNN.

    Against The Motion

    Genevieve Bell is an Intel Fellow and vice president of the Corporate Strategy Office at Intel Corporation. She leads a team of social scientists, interaction designers, human factors engineers and computer scientists focused on people’s needs and desires to help shape new Intel products and technologies. An accomplished anthropologist, researcher and author, she has been granted a number of patents for consumer electronics innovations. Bell is a highly regarded industry expert and frequent commentator on the intersection of culture and technology, featured in Wired, Forbes, The Atlantic, The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times. She was recognized as one of the "100 Most Creative People in Business" by Fast Company, inducted into the Women in Technology International Hall of Fame, and honored as the 2013 Woman of Vision for Leadership by the Anita Borg Institute. With Paul Dourish, she authored Divining a Digital Future (2011).

    More From The Debate

    Read A Transcript Listen To The Full Audio Of The Debate Playlist Download David Weinberger is a senior researcher at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard, where he previously served as co-director of the Library Innovation Lab and led its Interoperability Initiative. He is currently a fellow at the Kennedy School’s Shorenstein Center for Media, Politics and Public Policy. His most recent book, Too Big to Know: Rethinking Knowledge Now That the Facts Aren’t the Facts, Experts Are Everywhere, and the Smartest Person in the Room Is the Room (2014), won two international Best Book of the Year awards. He has been published by Wired, Harvard Business Review, Scientific American, The New York Times and elsewhere. Additionally, Weinberger advised three U.S. presidential campaigns on Internet issues and was a Franklin Fellow at the State Department. Called a "marketing guru" by The Wall Street Journal, he was previously a high-tech marketing VP and strategic marketing consultant, a dotcom entrepreneur, and now serves on the advisory boards of several tech companies.

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  4. Humans Are Only a Self-driving Car’s Way of Making Another Self-driving Car

    Over 10,000 years ago we lived in balance with the network. Since then we’ve tried to control, rule and bend it to our whims. In all that time, we’ve never asked ourselves if we’re building something that controls us?

    http://2014.dconstruct.org/conference/briansuda/

    Brian Suda is an informatician, which is definitely a real word and not just something he made up once. It is perfectly cromulent.

    Brian lives and works in Reykjavík by way of Edinburgh by way of St. Louis. He’s been living in Iceland long enough that he can correctly pronounce Eyjafjallajökull. That’s quite an impressive party trick …unless the party is in Iceland.

    Brian is a data hound, moving from project to project, always finding interesting ways to expose and represent the data exhaust of our network engine. He built one of the earliest microformats parsers and has written a book on Designing With Data.

    Together with Aitor Garcia, Brian has formed Analog. Their first project involves the production of Kickstarter-funded notebooks beautifully embossed with geographical data.

    At some point, he plans to graph all the world‘s baked goods on a hypercube of bread.

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  5. Face it: The internet of things isn’t going to develop like the web

    We spend a lot of time on the show discussing standards and how data should move easily around the internet of things, but this week Tom Coates tells us that vision isn’t realistic.

    http://gigaom.com/2014/08/12/face-it-the-internet-of-things-isnt-going-to-develop-like-the-web/

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  6. Thinking Differently - Warren Ellis, Ben Hammersley, Edie Lush - YouTube

    Watch more technology debates here: http://iai.tv/debates-and-talks?theme=technology-and-society The internet revolution is changing our lives and how cultur…

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j6iKVl3EyP8

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  7. Jason Fried: Why work doesn’t happen at work | Talk Video | TED.com

    Jason Fried has a radical theory of working: that the office isn’t a good place to do it. In his talk, he lays out the main problems (call them the M&Ms) and offers three suggestions to make work work.

    (Filmed at TEDxMidWest.)

    http://www.ted.com/talks/jason_fried_why_work_doesn_t_happen_at_work

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  8. How Retailers Use Smartphones To Track Shoppers In The Store : NPR

    Retailers aren’t only tracking consumers online; they’re also doing it when consumers shop in brick-and-mortar stores. Robert Siegel talks to Latanya Sweeney, chief technology officer for the Federal Trade Commission, about how the tracking works and whether consumers can opt out.

    http://www.npr.org/2014/06/16/322597862/how-retailers-use-smartphones-to-track-shoppers-in-the-store?ft=1&f=2

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  9. Seth Godin — The Art of Noticing, and Then Creating | On Being

    The idea that today’s population are simply masses afraid of the uncertainty of the future given the change from an industrial economy to a technology economy has no basis in fact and is, frankly, insulting.

    There is no doubt that the freedom for such things as creativity and art has expanded as has the ability to reach inside all cultures.

    This is a good thing.

    That is not to what Krista seems to be guiding us in this ‘fear of change’ dialog.

    People across the Western world are fearful because of the loss of democracy and the turn of free and democratic institutions into autocratic and criminal ones.

    We watch as tens of trillions of dollars in public wealth is moved from the lower/middle classes to the top all by corporate fraud with a complete suspension of Rule of Law in Western nations.

    Security is the growth industry as jobs in national security, Homeland security, building security, the military and police are the predominate job markets now.

    This is not a good thing, it is bad.

    We watch as diversified and competitive markets are drying and fixed by the ownership of all business activity in America by a handful of mega-corporations.

    This is not evolution and it is not something to relax and accept…..it is something for which to be fearful and to revolt.

    Even as I acknowledge the benefits of internet as regards culture and creativity the predominate issue for all people is the Big Brother nature of the web and the fact that all of it is owned by people who can now simply legislate the ability to have it all shut down…..remember, all of our public modes of communication are being dismantled so communication that is centralized like this is easily cut off as we saw with the uprisings last Spring.

    The US quickly passed laws allowing this complete shutdown as it made domestic detention for ‘terrorism’ legal as well.

    This is of course not evolution it is devolution.

    We are seeing a wealth inequity equal to the Renaissance and the same social structuring taking place…..goodbye Enlightment these leaders say as democracy disappears and poverty increases all

    by way of massive criminal activity.

    These are the morals, ethics, and values the people see today and are never spoken of on Krista’s program as she works to obscure the seriousness of the times!!

    http://www.onbeing.org/program/seth-godin-on-the-art-of-noticing-and-then-creating/5000

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  10. Seth Godin on the Art of Noticing, and Then Creating | On Being

    The idea that today’s population are simply masses afraid of the uncertainty of the future given the change from an industrial economy to a technology economy has no basis in fact and is, frankly, insulting.

    There is no doubt that the freedom for such things as creativity and art has expanded as has the ability to reach inside all cultures.

    This is a good thing.

    That is not to what Krista seems to be guiding us in this ‘fear of change’ dialog.

    People across the Western world are fearful because of the loss of democracy and the turn of free and democratic institutions into autocratic and criminal ones.

    We watch as tens of trillions of dollars in public wealth is moved from the lower/middle classes to the top all by corporate fraud with a complete suspension of Rule of Law in Western nations.

    Security is the growth industry as jobs in national security, Homeland security, building security, the military and police are the predominate job markets now.

    This is not a good thing, it is bad.

    We watch as diversified and competitive markets are drying and fixed by the ownership of all business activity in America by a handful of mega-corporations.

    This is not evolution and it is not something to relax and accept…..it is something for which to be fearful and to revolt.

    Even as I acknowledge the benefits of internet as regards culture and creativity the predominate issue for all people is the Big Brother nature of the web and the fact that all of it is owned by people who can now simply legislate the ability to have it all shut down…..remember, all of our public modes of communication are being dismantled so communication that is centralized like this is easily cut off as we saw with the uprisings last Spring.

    The US quickly passed laws allowing this complete shutdown as it made domestic detention for ‘terrorism’ legal as well.

    This is of course not evolution it is devolution.

    We are seeing a wealth inequity equal to the Renaissance and the same social structuring taking place…..goodbye Enlightment these leaders say as democracy disappears and poverty increases all

    by way of massive criminal activity.

    These are the morals, ethics, and values the people see today and are never spoken of on Krista’s program as she works to obscure the seriousness of the times!!

    http://www.onbeing.org/program/seth-godin-on-the-art-of-noticing-and-then-creating/5000

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

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