brianmedema / Brian Medema

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Huffduffed (156)

  1. OA154: Stormy Daniels is a Legal Genius - Opening Arguments

    This emergency episode examines the Complaint filed by Stormy Daniels seeking a legal determination that the Settlement Agreement entered into between her, Donald Trump’s lawyer, and (allegedly) Donald Trump is not legally binding.

    We honestly believe that this is a much bigger bombshell than is being portrayed by the press.  Listen and find out why.

    We also end with an all-new TTTBE #66 featuring David Michael.  You won’t want to miss it!  Remember that you can play along with #TTTBE by retweeting our episode on Twitter or sharing it on Facebook along with your guess.  We’ll release the answer on next Tuesday’s episode along with our favorite entry!

    Support us on Patreon at:

    Follow us on Twitter:  @Openargs


    Don’t forget the OA Facebook Community!

    And email us at

    Direct Download

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    —Huffduffed by brianmedema

  2. Mac Power Users #415: John Siracusa Workflows and the Future of the Mac - Relay FM

    John Siracusa returns to the Mac Power Users to talk about his favorite workflows and apps. We also spend some time getting John’s opinion about where the Mac is and where it is heading.

    —Huffduffed by brianmedema

  3. Shardcast: Oathbringer Part Two Epigraphs - Shardcast - 17th Shard, the Official Brandon Sanderson Fansite

    Welcome to Shardcast, the Brandon Sanderson Podcast. Today we are here to discuss the Oathbringer’s Part Two Epigraphs. That means it does have Oathbringe…

    —Huffduffed by brianmedema

  4. #351: The Surprising Power of a “Useless” Liberal Arts Education

    We’ve all heard the jokes about useless liberal arts degrees, but my guest today argues that in today’s high tech economy, liberal arts degrees can be incredibly useful and even lucrative. His name is George Anders and he’s the author of the book "You Can Do Anything: The Surprising Power of a ’Useless’ Liberal Arts Education." We begin our conversation looking at research that suggests that the jobs that pay the most money and are in the most demand today require a liberal arts background, and not necessarily a STEM degree. He then goes on to highlight research that shows how most of the jobs being created today aren’t in computer programming or engineering, but rather in jobs that support those fields like sales, management, and consulting. George then argues that individuals with a liberal arts background are in a killer position to fill those jobs. 

    We then discuss the perils of liberal arts degrees and what individuals who’ve earned them can do to market themselves and take control of their careers.

    —Huffduffed by brianmedema

  5. #342: Why Boredom is Good for You

    In the age where smartphones provide constant stimulation, many of us have forgotten what it feels like to experience the monotony of boredom. And while on the surface that might seem like a good thing, my guest today highlights research that not being bored can actually make us dumber and less creative. 

    Her name is Manoush Zomorodi, she’s the host of the podcast Note to Self and the author of the book "Bored and Brilliant: How Spacing Out Can Unlock Your Most Productive and Creative Self." Today on the show, Manoush shares her experience of how feeling scattered and less creative led her to create an experiment that tested whether her lack of boredom in recent years was to blame. We then dig into the philosophy of boredom and why we dread it so much. Manoush then goes into what the latest research says about the benefits of boredom, like increased creativity, better productivity, and improved mental well-being. Finally, she walks us through some exercises you can use to help inject more boredom in your life. (Yes, you read that right.)

    —Huffduffed by brianmedema

  6. #326: Why Boys Are Struggling & What We Can Do To Help Them

    While there’s been a big push in recent decades to help girls thrive in school and in the workplace, boys in America have quietly been struggling. For example, boys are more likely to have learning and discipline issues in school and are less likely to graduate high school than girls, more women are now attending college than men and are earning more bachelors and masters degrees than men, the incarceration rate for boys has increased in the past few decades, and suicide rates have increased among teenage boys. What’s more, teachers and therapists have reported that boys seem increasingly disengaged from school and life.

    If boys are having so much trouble, why don’t we hear more about it? And more importantly, what can we do as parents, teachers, and mentors to help them?

    My guest today has spent his career researching childhood development and helping boys become fulfilled men. His name is Michael Gurian, and in his latest book, "Saving Our Sons: A New Path for Raising Healthy and Resilient Boys," he provides insights on why America’s boy problem is ignored, as well as concrete steps that parents and mentors can take to help these young men grow up well.

    Today on the show, Michael explains what the "Dominant Gender Paradigm" is and why it causes institutions to ignore the problems of boys and young men, what people get wrong about male violence, and what male anhedonia is. He then argues that if we want to help boys (and girls) we need to approach things from what he calls a "Nature Based Theory," which recognizes that while boys and girls have a lot in common, there are biological differences that influence the way boys learn, socialize, and behave. Michael then provides concrete things parents and schools can do to cater to these differences in boys to help them thrive and become resilient men.

    If you’re the parent of boy or if you teach or mentor young boys, you don’t want to miss this episode.

    —Huffduffed by brianmedema

  7. Clockwise #197: So Much of Your Life is a Lie - Relay FM

    Net neutrality, brain-training games, wireless charging, and our camera-filled future.

    —Huffduffed by brianmedema

  8. #295: Kettlebells and the Psychology of Training

    My interview today is with Craig Marker, a StrongFirst kettlebell trainer, and psychology professor at Mercer University.

    We’re big fans of the kettlebell here at the Art of Manliness. It’s a great piece of gym equipment that builds both strength and cardiovascular conditioning. Today on the show, I talk to StrongFirst kettlebell coach Craig Marker about the wonders of these little cannonballs with handles. Mark digs deep into the research done by the Soviets back in the 70s and 80s that shows why kettlebells are an effective tool for building explosive power, and how kettlebell training can improve your deadlift, help you jump higher, and even lead you to becoming a better ballerina (if that’s your thing).

    We then segue our conversation to talking about training in general and the mistakes beginners make when starting with a strength program. Mark then makes the case that in addition to our regular workouts, we should live our lives like it’s the 1940s if we want to see improved health and happiness.

    We end our conversation talking a bit about Craig’s day job as a psychology professor at Mercer University and how his training as a psychologist has helped him improve his coaching and fitness training. He even shares a little trick you can play on your brain to lift more weight or run faster.

    —Huffduffed by brianmedema

  9. Episode 40: Cold Case — Broken Jars Broadcasting

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    —Huffduffed by brianmedema

  10. #280: Why Growing Up Is a Subversive Act

    But what if growing up doesn’t mean you have to be boring and lame? What if becoming a grown-up is actually a really rebellious act?

    That’s the argument my guest today makes in her latest book. Her name is Susan Neiman and she’s the author of ‘Why Grow Up? Subversive Thoughts for an Infantile Age.’ Today on the show, Susan and I discuss why becoming a grown-up has gotten a bad rap, how our culture— including smartphones— infantilizes us, and what the Enlightenment thinkers Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Emanuel Kant can teach us about how to become a grown-up. Susan then goes on to share ideas on what you can do to feel more like an autonomous adult and why embracing that role is such a subversive thing to do.

    —Huffduffed by brianmedema

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