boxman / tags / games

Tagged with “games” (6)

  1. Tom Armitage on CBC Radio

    "This afternoon, I interviewed Tom Armitage. He’s a software designer who recently came to our attention because of a talk he gave recently, called "If Gamers Ran the World." In it, he puts forth the idea that in another 10 years, leaders who are the same age as Barack Obama or British Conservative Party leader David Cameron are now, will be children of the 1970s, and as such, more than likely the first leaders who grew up with video games as a core part of their way of interact with the world around them. What would that mean for how they would behave as leaders? A shorter version of this interview airs on the Jan 7th and 10th episode of Spark" — http://www.cbc.ca/spark/blog/2009/01/full_interview_tom_armitage.html

    —Huffduffed by boxman

  2. Making Friends: On Toys and Toymaking — dConstruct Audio Archive

    Toys are not idle knick-knacks: they allow us to explore otherwise impossible terrain; fire the imagination; provide sparks for structured play. They do not just entertain and delight; they stimulate and inspire. And always, they remind us of the value - and values - to be found in abstract play.

    http://archive.dconstruct.org/2012/makingfriends

    —Huffduffed by boxman

  3. Fun Inc.: Why games are the 21st century’s most serious business

    Why should we be taking video games more seriously?

    In 2008 Nintendo overtook Google to become the world’s most profitable company per employee. The South Korean government will invest $200 billion into its video games industry over the next 4 years. The trading of virtual goods within games is a global industry worth over $10 billion a year. Gaming boasts the world’s fastest-growing advertising market.

    In addition to these impressive statistics, video games are creating a whole new science of mass engagement which is beginning to revolutionise the way we research and understand economics, human behaviour and democratic participation. Games are used to train the US Military, to model global pandemics and to campaign against human rights abuses in Africa.

    Journalist and author Tom Chatfield visits the RSA to examine the ways in which virtual game worlds can function as unprecedented laboratories for exploring human motivations, and for evaluating economic theories that it has never been possible before to test experimentally.

    He will argue that games are becoming one of the most powerful tools available for raising awareness of political, ethical and environmental issues, and promoting action across an extraordinary range of fields and disciplines – from medicine to warfare to, perhaps most importantly, education.

    Response by Ed Vaizey MP, Shadow Minister for Culture

    Chaired by Rory Cellan-Jones, BBC technology correspondent

    —Huffduffed by boxman

  4. Design games (10-minute talk)

    Playing games is more fun than work, right? So if we can combine games and work, work will be fun. Design games can help you learn about your users, or help a design team generate better solutions.

    —Huffduffed by boxman

  5. RSA Design & Society - Playing the City

    Kevin Slavin, urban consultant and co-founder of New York computer games studio Area/Code presents a powerful argument for games as social systems with people at the centre; for the “software” of cities as what runs on the “hardware” of buildings and streets; for an “urban sport” that can educate behaviour by leaking from computers into the social world; and above all, for designers today to build the systems that will propagate and feed us, not the things we will consume.

    —Huffduffed by boxman

  6. Will Wright on Spore, A.I. and the Future of Gaming

    Does the future of video games spell the end of the world? Or does humanity have more to learn from a virtual world inhabited by connected kids, intelligent robots … and the Obama campaign? You’ve seen the video and the outtakes from his chat at the 2008 Breakthrough Conference after winning in the products category. Now download PM’s entire wide-ranging chat with Will Wright, the gaming guru and geek god behind Sim City and Spore, on a Breakthrough Award season finale of The Popular Mechanics Show.

    —Huffduffed by boxman