boxman / tags / culture

Tagged with “culture” (7)

  1. Admiral Shovel and the Toilet Roll — dConstruct Audio Archive

    It begins to look as if we might have been wrong. All those predictions driving us forward throughout history have brought us finally to the unexpected realisation that the future is, suddenly, no longer what it used to be. Oops.

    http://archive.dconstruct.org/2012/admiralshovel

    —Huffduffed by boxman

  2. BBC - Podcasts - Four Thought: Russell M. Davies 21 Sept 2011

    Four Thought talks include stories and ideas which will affect our future, in politics, society, the economy, business, science, technology or the arts. Recorded live, the talks are given by a range of people with a new thought to share.

    After the internet and social media, what will be the next technological revolution? Writer, blogger and social entrepreneur Russell M. Davies argues that like the early days of blogging, we are about to witness another flowering of individual creativity. This time, he says, it will unleash "all sorts of interesting gadgety things", and determine our relationships with them. "It’s about making your own stuff, which might be a bit silly and a bit trivial and pointless, but you get the satisfaction of making it yourself," he says. This revolution in individual gadgetry - and designing our relationship with them - will prove "exciting, radical, life-affirming stuff". Four Thought is a series of talks which combine thought provoking ideas and engaging storytelling. Recorded in front of an audience at the RSA in London, speakers take to the stage to air their latest thinking on the trends, ideas, interests and passions that affect our culture and society.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/fourthought

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  3. Four Thought: James Bridle

    James Bridle asks how computer networks will affect cultural memories.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/fourthought

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  4. Matt Ridley: Deep Optimism

    Everything’s going to Hell in a handbasket! Or is it?

    Not according to Matt Ridley. Ridley takes a long-term view of humanity’s past to project a deeply optimistic view of our future. This program was recorded in collaboration with the Long Now Foundation, on March 22, 2011.

    This program contains visual aids. A complete video version is available at: http://fora.tv/2011/03/22/Matt_Ridley_Deep_Optimism

    Via trade and other cultural activities, "ideas have sex," and that drives human history in the direction of inconstant but accumulative improvement over time. The criers of havoc keep being proved wrong. A fundamental optimism about human affairs is deeply rational and can be reliably conjured with.

    Trained at Oxford as a zoologist and an editor at The Economist for eight years, Matt Ridley’s newest book is The Rational Optimist: How Prosperity Evolves. His earlier works include Francis Crick; Nature via Nurture; Genome; and The Origins of Virtue.

    Matt Ridley’s books have sold over 800,000 copies, been translated into 27 languages and been short-listed for six literary prizes. In 2004 he won the National Academies Book Award from the US National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine for Nature via Nurture.

    He is married to the neuroscientist Professor Anya Hurlbert. They have two children and live at Blagdon near Newcastle upon Tyne.

    —Huffduffed by boxman

  5. Signing, Singing, Speaking: How Language Evolved : NPR

    Humans evolved a brain with an extraordinary knack for language, but just how and when we began using language is still largely a mystery. Early human communication may have been in sign language or song, and scientists are studying other animals to learn how human language evolved.

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=129155123

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  6. Music and the Brain

    Science Weekly takes on evolutionary psychologist Stephen Pinker’s idea that music is merely "auditory cheesecake" - pleasant on the ear but ultimately not much use.

    In our Music and the Brain special, James Randerson and the team ask why music evolved, how it is linked to language, how it is understood by the brain and how it can be used to treat patients.

    Dr Ian Cross talks about how music acts as a social tool. Dr Eric Clark at Oxford University tells us why dance music has such a profound effect on a club full of revellers. And Paul Robertson, founder and leader of the Medici String Quartet explains music can communicate subtle ideas and help people with Alzheimer’s diease. Also, Dr Adena Schachner at Harvard tell us why animals dance.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/audio/2008/aug/18/science.weekly.podcast

    —Huffduffed by boxman

  7. Kevin Kelly on the Future of the Web and Everything Else

    March 26 2007 - Author Kevin Kelly talks about the role of technology in our lives, the future of the web, how to time travel, the wisdom of the hive, the economics of reputation, the convergence of the biological and the mechanical, and his impact on the movies The Matrix and Minority Report.

    —Huffduffed by boxman