boxman / tags / conference

Tagged with “conference” (9)

  1. BBC Click: dConstruct: Living with the Network

    How computers and digital technology affect our lives around the world.

    Click investigates triumphs and pitfalls of the digital age at the dConstruct conference.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/digitalp

    —Huffduffed by boxman

  2. Designing the Wider Web

    The dominance of the desktop browser is over – the web has become wider. After so long painting in a tiny corner of the canvas, it’s time to broaden our approach.

    It’s understandable that the community is somewhat nervous about the changes ahead. So far, we’ve mostly responded by scratching around for device-specific tips, but this isn’t sustainable or scalable. We should transcend “platformism” and instead learn to design for diverse contexts, displays, connectivity, and inputs by breaking devices down into first principles. Instead of the defective dichotomy of the “desktop” and “mobile” web, designers should aim to create great user experiences using the truly fluid nature of the web.

    http://www.iakonferenz.org/sessions/6

    —Huffduffed by boxman

  3. Cennydd Bowles: Closing Plenary | IA Summit Library

    The IA Summit closing plenary tradition started in 2005 as a way to bring the Summit to an end withan inquisitive session looking to the future of our practice and practitioners. The selection criteria for the closing plenary speaker is simple but important: an interesting voice from within our community with something meaningful to say about the direction of the practice.

    http://library.iasummit.org/podcasts/closing-plenary/

    —Huffduffed by boxman

  4. James Bridle — Wrangling Time: The Form and Future of the Book

    The internet has been around long enough now that it has a proper history, and it has started to produce media and artefacts that live in and comment on that history. James will be talking about his work with writing, books and wikipedia that hopes to explain and illuminate this temporal depth.

    James Bridle is a publisher, writer and artist based in London, UK. He founded the print-on-demand classics press Bookkake and the e-book-only imprint Artists’ eBooks, and created Bkkeepr, a tool for tracking reading and sharing bookmarks, and Quietube, an accidental anti-censorship proxy for the Middle East. He makes things with words, books and the internet, and writes about what he does at booktwo.org.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/james-bridle-wrangling-time-the-form-and-future-of-the-book/

    —Huffduffed by boxman

  5. Mark Boulton — Designing grid systems

    Grid sys tems have been used in print design, archi tec ture and inte rior design for gen­er a tions. Now, on the web, the same rules of grid sys tem com po si tion and usage no longer apply. Content is viewed in many ways; from RSS feeds to email. Content is viewed on many devices; from mobile phones to lap tops. Users can manip u late the browser, they can remove con tent, resize the can vas, resize the type faces. A designer is no longer in con trol of this pre sen ta tion. So where do grid sys tems fit in to all that?

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/mark-boulton-designing-grid-systems/

    —Huffduffed by boxman

  6. Materialising and Dematerialising A Web of Data. (Or What We’ve Learned From Printing The Internet Out)

    A couple of years back Tom Coates talked at dConstruct about ’Designing For A Web of Data’, about the idea that your data, the bits that represent you and are useful or interesting to you on the web, are escaping the confines of particular websites and are getting smeared around the web through services and APIs and widgets and myriad other things. (I hope I’m paraphrasing him fairly.) And then, last year, Matts Jones and Biddulph took that on more and talked about ’Designing For The Coral Reef’ and about how they were spreading Dopplr via that web of data, and onto devices, and asynchronous infrastructures and distributed interwoven systems, and slippy maps and geography, and there was a rubber duck in there somewhere as well.

    I loved all that. I wanted to make a contribution to that conversation. But my technical abilities are such that all I can really do to manipulate the web is print it out, and that didn’t seem enough.

    And then I got involved with making Things Our Friends Have Written On The Internet and I realised that printing it out is the next step. What’s happening now is that the web of data wants to escape the screen, it wants to materialise into the real world, it wants to get physical, become objects. And that the next exciting stuff is going to be about designing data that can live on the screen, in devices, on paper, as things, wherever.

    So that’s what I’m hoping to talk about. About getting a little post-digital, about analogue friction, about printing to large industrial infrastructures, about unproducts and letter-boxes and rabbits. And there’ll be jokes and silly videos too.

    http://2009.dconstruct.org/schedule/russelldavies/

    Russell was born in Derby, enjoyed an uneventful childhood, did college, all that. After failing as a popstar and a joke writer he ended up in advertising and tried to do ‘interactive marketing’ way before anyone was interested. Ended up at Wieden + Kennedy working on clients like Microsoft, Nike and Honda. Then he went to work for Nike as Global Consumer Planning Director.

    He went freelance in 2006 and works with shadowy organisations like the Open Intelligence Agency and the Really Interesting Group. He also writes eggbaconchipsandbeans occasionally organises ‘Interesting’ conferences, plays with things like speechification, dawdlr and slowpoke and does columns for Campaign magazine and Wired UK.

    If asked what he actually does all day, he’ll normally mutter something about ‘post-digital’.

    —Huffduffed by boxman

  7. Experience and the Emotion Commotion

    The competitive environment for technology is changing, and its impact on experience design is deep: capabilities, features, and functions are no longer enough. Emotional engagement will distinguish successful consumer experiences of the future. Designing in this world requires we change the way we think about people and products. This presentation provides a brief overview of a counter-intuitive emotional design approach and its application to one of the hallmarks of the next phase in interaction design: Natural User Interface.

    http://2009.dconstruct.org/schedule/augustdelosreyes/

    August de los Reyes is the Principal Director of User Experience for Microsoft Surface, a team dedicated to pioneering natural and intuitive ways to interact with technology.

    August is a member of the Advanced Studies Program at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design where he received an MDesS with Distinction for his research in product design and emotion. A guest design faculty member at the University of Washington, he was a 2007-2008 visiting associate at the Oxford Internet Institute. He is working on his next book entitled The Poetics of Everyday Objects.

    —Huffduffed by boxman

  8. Elements of a Networked Urbanism by Adam Greenfield

    Over the past several years, we’ve watched as a very wide variety of objects and surfaces familiar from everyday life have been reimagined as networked information-gathering, -processing, -storage and -display resources. Why should cities be any different?

    What happens to urban form and metropolitan experience under such circumstances? What are the implications for us, as designers, consumers and as citizens?

    http://2009.dconstruct.org/schedule/adamgreenfield/

    Adam Greenfield lives in a city and thinks you probably do, too.

    —Huffduffed by boxman

  9. Instrumenting your life – Tom Coates

    New product ideas are increasingly based around the surfacing, exposing and recombination of data - and people are the biggest source of data there is. The last few years have seen us exploring the possibilities of social data and we’re on the brink of the mainstreaming of location - so what’s next? What parts of our lives can we track and instrument? What new product possibilities emerge? And what of data portability, ownership, brokerage and privacy?

    —Huffduffed by boxman