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Tagged with “technology” (529)

  1. Ep 6: Y’all Don’t Deserve Us – The Git Cute Podcast

    Women of color go out of their way every day in technology to educate the community in the ongoing oppression and aggression that happen every day. Y’all need to do better.

    https://gitcutepodcast.com/2019/08/31/episode-6-yall-dont-deserve-us/

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  2. Conversations with Tyler: Neal Stephenson on Depictions of Reality

    If you want to speculate on the development of tech, no one has a better brain to pick than Neal Stephenson. Across more than a dozen books, he’s created vast story worlds driven by futuristic technologies that have both prophesied and even provoked real-world progress in crypto, social networks, and the creation of the web itself. Though Stephenson insists he’s more often wrong than right, his technical sharpness has even led to a half-joking suggestion that he might be Satoshi Nakamoto, the shadowy creator of bitcoin. His latest novel, Fall; or, Dodge in Hell, involves a more literal sort of brain-picking, exploring what might happen when digitized brains can find a second existence in a virtual afterlife.

    So what’s the implicit theology of a simulated world? Might we be living in one, and does it even matter? Stephenson joins Tyler to discuss the book and more, including the future of physical surveillance, how clothing will evolve, the kind of freedom you could expect on a Mars colony, whether today’s media fragmentation is trending us towards dystopia, why the Apollo moon landings were communism’s greatest triumph, whether we’re in a permanent secular innovation starvation, Leibniz as a philosopher, Dickens and Heinlein as writers, and what storytelling has to do with giving good driving directions.

    http://cowenconvos.libsyn.com/neal-stephenson

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  3. Clive Thompson: How Tech Remade the World | Commonwealth Club

    When we think of the people behind the most influential technological advances of our day, we usually imagine the leaders of the industry but forget the armies behind them: coders. Dedicated to the pursuit of higher efficiency, these lovers of logic and puzzles are able to withstand unbelievable amounts of frustration; they are arguably the most quietly influential people on the planet.

    In his new book, Coders: The Making of a New Tribe and the Remaking of the World, Clive Thompson argues just that. Through increasingly pervasive artificial intelligence, coders have a larger and larger role to play. Thompson analyzes how embedded this industry is in our lives, questioning the lack of geographic and demographic diversity in the sector while outlining his optimistic view on the opportunities that this age of code can unlock. Join us for a conversation about this frequently misunderstood industry culture and a refreshingly enthusiastic take on its future. 

    Thompson is a freelance journalist and one of the most prominent technology writers. He is a longtime contributor to The New York Times Magazine and a columnist for Wired. 

    https://www.commonwealthclub.org/events/archive/podcast/clive-thompson-how-tech-remade-world

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  4. Rethinking Technological Positivism with Cory Doctorow - CoRecursive Podcast

    Self-driving cars or armed autonomous military robots may make use of the same technologies. In a certain sense, we as software developers are helping to build and shape the future. What does the future look like and are we helping build the right one? Is technology a force for liberty or oppression.

    Cory Doctorow is one of my favorite authors and also a public intellectual with a keen insight into the dangers we face a society. In this interview, I ask him how to avoid ending up in a techno-totalitarian society. We also talk about Turing, DRM, data mining and monopolies.

    https://corecursive.com/33-cory-doctorow-digital-rights/

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  5. 36 Seconds That Changed Everything – How the iPhone Learned to Talk

    From the moment Steve Jobs announced it in 2007, anticipation for the first iPhone was off the charts. And when it shipped? Customers lined up around their local Apple stores; some arriving days before the phones could be bought.

    But the hype and hysteria left one group of cell phone users out – if you had a disability, the new hotness was just a cold, unresponsive rectangle of plastic and glass.

    This is the story of how that changed in June of 2009, and what it has meant to people who are blind, have a hearing disability, or experience motor delays.

    This is the story of iPhone accessibility.

    http://www.36seconds.org/

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  6. Computers at Home

    In the 1980s, ‘micro computers’ invaded the home. In this episode, Hannah Fry discovers how the computer was transported from the office and the classroom right into our living room.

    From eccentric electronics genius Clive Sinclair and his ZX80, to smart-suited businessman Alan Sugar and the Amstrad PC, she charts the 80s computer boom - a time when the UK had more computers per head of population than anywhere else in the world.

    Presented by Hannah Fry

    Produced by Michelle Martin

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b06bnq0y

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  7. #32: ‘Hula Hoops not Bicycles’: Genevieve Bell talks Anthropology, Technology & Building the Future

    "We were bringing the voices of people that didn’t get inside the building, inside the building and making them count. And I took that as an incredible responsibility, that you should give those voices weight and dignity and power."

    We are excited to announce that this is the FIRST EPISODE OF OUR STS SERIES! The goal of the STS (science and technology studies, or science, technology and society - your pick!) Series is to explore the ways that humans, science and technology interact. While we have released some STS episodes in 2018, we still had some left in the bag from the 4S Conference PLUS many new ones as well. Let’s go!

    Genevieve Bell, Director of the Autonomy, Agency and Assurance (also known as the 3A) Insitute and Florence McKenzie Chair (which promotes the inclusive use of technology in society) at the Australian National University, Vice President and Senior Fellow at Intel Corporation, and ABC’s 2017 Boyer Lecturer, talks to our own Jodie-Lee Trembath about building the future and a question at the heart of STS inquiry: "what is important to humans and how we can make sense of that to unpack the world that we live in?". They begin by reflecting on the Acknowledgement of Country that we begin every podcast episode with and the power that comes from realising our positions, then discuss being an anthropologist in Silicon Valley, learning how to ‘translate’ anthropology to different audiences, predicting the world in 10 years time and the importance of rituals (especially when finishing your PhD!).

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/thefamiliarstrange/32-hula-hoops-not-bicycles-genevieve-bell
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Sun, 26 May 2019 10:17:47 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  8. Brendan Dawes ‘Working at the intersection of People, Objects & Technology.’ - This is HCD

    We’re at Pixel Pioneers in Belfast today.

    A conference that has been going for two years.

    It was a fantastic day.

    https://www.thisishcd.com/interaction-design/brendan-dawes-working-at-the-intersection-of-people-objects-technology/

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  9. Katie Bouman: How to take a picture of a black hole | TED Talk

    At the heart of the Milky Way, there’s a supermassive black hole that feeds off a spinning disk of hot gas, sucking up anything that ventures too close — even light. We can’t see it, but its event horizon casts a shadow, and an image of that shadow could help answer some important questions about the universe. Scientists used to think that making such an image would require a telescope the size of Earth — until Katie Bouman and a team of astronomers came up with a clever alternative. Bouman explains how we can take a picture of the ultimate dark using the Event Horizon Telescope.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/katie_bouman_what_does_a_black_hole_look_like

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  10. Thriving in a Digital World: My Conversation with Stratechery’s Ben Thompson [The Knowledge Project Ep. #40]

    Stratechery’s Ben Thompson visits The Knowledge Project and shares his thoughts on business in the digital age, running a one-man publishing company, and how technology will transform our future

    https://fs.blog/ben-thompson/

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