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boagworld / collective

There are two people in boagworld’s collective.

Huffduffed (3586)

  1. Harald Dunnink — The Good, The Bad, and The Interesting

    This is a different kind of episode. Usually I invite guests to listen to them, in this episode I start out with an explanation of why I think the website for the new Master Digital Design program at the University of Applied Sciences in Amsterdam is not well designed. And after that I discuss this together with Harald Dunnink, who designed this website. As was to be expected, he disagrees with me.

    Harald invited me to record this conversation after I ranted my opinion on twitter. It turns out sitting on a bench on a nice summer evening outside the Momkai offices in Amsterdam is a much better environment to discuss good web design than twitter.

    https://vasilis.nl/gbi/2017/06/22/harald-dunnink-2/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Rise of the machines: who is the ‘internet of things’ good for? – podcast | Technology | The Guardian

    Interconnected technology is now an inescapable reality – ordering our groceries, monitoring our cities and sucking up vast amounts of data along the way. The promise is that it will benefit us all – but how can it?

    https://www.theguardian.com/technology/audio/2017/jun/19/rise-of-the-machines-who-is-the-internet-of-things-good-for-podcast

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Anna Debenham and Brad Frost

    Anna and Brad talk about what’s changed since the first season of the Style Guides Podcast, and talk about what topics they’d like to cover this season.

    https://soundcloud.com/style-guide-podcast/anna-debenham-and-brad-frost

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Harry Roberts — The Tools of a CSS Front-end Architect

    Harry Roberts is an award-winning Consultant Front-end Architect, writer, and speaker from the UK. Roberts is often asked for his advice by web teams to help make their CSS better organized and more efficient.

    https://goodstuff.fm/nbsp/121

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Episode 05-Handed Down | shannonheatonmusic.com

    It’s warming up in many corners of the world, and many players are heading to Summer Music Camps!

    But of course, music camps are just ONE way that Irish traditional music is handed down. And for this episode, I traveled to Pearl River, NY, Galway City, and to neighborhoods around Boston, to talk with musicians about how they learned their music, and how this has led them to pass it on.

    Séan Clohessy

    There’s big picture inspiration here from Sean Clohessy:“We have rhythm all around us—whether it’s breathing, a heart beat, blinking, walking, the seasons.. there’s rhythm in everything. Irish music is an easy way to perceive a lot of these things, and see things we can’t see with our eyes.”

    And there are intimate Irish music house sessions and concerts that have inspired Josie Coyne:“Falling asleep listening to amazing music, ever since I was really young.To meet all these musicians.. It’s pretty great.”

    And wisdom from Séamus Connolly, whose Collection of Irish Music is available online to all!“If traditional music is locked up, it doesn’t advance or move on. It’s very much a living tradition, and it should be that way.”

    Flanagan, Mulvahill, Furlong

    I hope you’ll join me as I talk with Rose Flanagan, Margie Mulvahill, Patty Furlong, Séan Clohessy, Josie and her dad John Coyne, Louis DePaor, Seamus Connolly, and Elizabeth Sweeney about their activities around traditional music, and how they feel about passing it on.

    Whether you already play tunes, sing ballads, dance sean nós steps.. or you don’t know anything about Irish culture… these conversations speak about friendships, community, and generosity.

    Seamus Connolly

    Read on for full music and poetry credits below. And take a peek at one of this month’s guests, Josie Coyne. This was back in 2013 (she’s 4 years older now..), when she joined fiddler Mick Conneely for a set.

    And here is Séamus Connolly at the NEA National Heritage Fellowship Concert from June 2014:

    Next month’s episode will air Tuesday July 11th. It’ll be a summer short about backers (accompanists). And on Thursday July 13th, I’ll be guest host of the Celtic Music Podcast. Hope you’ll check it out!

    Music Heard on IMS Episode 05

    all music traditional, unless otherwise indicated

    Tune: “Tap Room, Mountain Road, Galway Rambler” (reels), from Rehearsal recording from circa 2009

    Artist: Dan Gurney (accordion), Shannon Heaton (flute), Matt Heaton (guitar)

    Tune: “Travel Theme,” from Production music made for Irish Music StoriesArtist: Matt Heaton (guitar)

    Composer: Matt & Shannon Heaton

    Tune: “After Hours Theme,” from Production music made for Irish Music StoriesArtist: Matt Heaton (guitar)

    Composer: Matt & Shannon Heaton

    Tune: “Broken Clock,” from A Sweeter PlaceArtist: Girsa, feat. Maeve Flanagan (fiddle),

    Composer: Maeve Flanagan

    Tune: “Grupai Ceol Theme,” from Production music made for Irish Music StoriesArtist: Matt Heaton (guitar)

    Composer: Matt & Shannon Heaton

    Tune: “Heartstrings Theme,” from Production music made for Irish Music StoriesArtist: Matt Heaton (guitar)

    Composer: Matt & Shannon Heaton

    Tune: “Tom Ashe’s March,” from Rehearsal recording from circa 2009

    Artist: Dan Gurney (accordion), Shannon Heaton (flute), Matt Heaton (guitar)

    Tune: “Seán Sa Cheo,” from one of the 78 rpm recordings made for Regal Zonophone

    Artist: Neilidh Boyle (fiddle)

    Tune: “Triumph Theme,” from Production music made for Irish Music StoriesArtist: Matt Heaton (guitar)

    Composer: Matt & Shannon Heaton

    Tune: “Katie’s Fancy” (jig), live in Rose’s Kitchen, 2016

    Artist: Rose Flanagan (fiddle), Patty Furlong (accordion), Margie Mulvahill (flute)

    ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: Thank you for listening. And thanks to Rose Flanagan, Patty Furlong, Margie Mulvahill, Séan Clohessy, Josie and her dad John Coyne, Louis DePaor, Seamus Connolly, and Elizabeth Sweeney for the beautiful conversations. Thanks, as always, to Matt Heaton for the beautiful guitar underscore, and for invaluable support to make these episodes.

    http://shannonheatonmusic.com/episode-05-handed-down/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. On the Arpanet - Computing Lives - IEEECS

     The fourth and final segment of the discussion about the 30-year history of research and development that created the underlying technologies on which the Web is based. Much of this foundation was laid in the 1960s by Douglas Carl Engelbart.

    https://www.computer.org/web/computing-lives/home/-/blogs/on-the-arpanet

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. The Demonstration - Computing Lives - IEEECS

     Part three of the discussion about the 30-year history of research and development that created the underlying technologies on which the Web is based. Much of this foundation was laid in the 1960s by Douglas Carl Engelbart.

    https://www.computer.org/web/computing-lives/home/-/blogs/the-demonstration

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Support from ARPA - Computing Lives - IEEECS

     Part two of the discussion about the 30-year history of research and development that created the underlying technologies on which the Web is based. Much of this foundation was laid in the 1960s by Douglas Carl Engelbart.

    https://www.computer.org/web/computing-lives/home/-/blogs/support-from-arpa

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Developing the Underlying Concepts for Contemporary Computing - Computing Lives - IEEECS

    A discussion about the 30-year history of research and development that created the underlying technologies on which the Web is based. Much of this foundation was laid in the 1960s by Douglas Carl Engelbart.

    https://www.computer.org/web/computing-lives/home/-/blogs/developing-the-underlying-concepts-for-contemporary-computing

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. The First Computer Dating

    In 1959, two Stanford undergraduate electrical engineering students enrolled in Math 139, Theory and Operation of Computing Machines, and as a final class project, devised the first known attempt at computer dating.

    From the analytical engine to the supercomputer, from Pascal to von Neumann, from punched cards to CD-ROMs-the "Computing Lives" Podcast of selected articles from the IEEE Annals of the History of Computing cover the breadth of computer history. This Podcast series features scholarly accounts by leading computer scientists and historians, as well as firsthand stories by computer pioneers.

    You can also get more computing history with IEEE Annals of the History of Computing.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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