boagworld / collective

There are two people in boagworld’s collective.

Huffduffed (3205)

  1. Modular Design — Responsive Web Design

    Imagine you’re embarking on a CMS replatforming and website redesign. Ethan and Karen explain how a modular design process that puts content modeling and design patterns first will help you.

    http://responsivewebdesign.com/podcast/modular-design/

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  2. ‘A bit of Capability Brown’ with Sean Johnson and Drew McLellan | Unfinished Business

    I know. I know! It’s been far too long since episode 117. But fret no more, Unfinished Business fans, we’re back and back for good, every two weeks with some brilliant guests and some good old fashioned conversations. This week, I’m joined by Sean Johnson and Drew McLellan to talk fat and fitness, cruises and coach trips.

    http://www.unfinished.bz/118

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Hired. - Mandy Brown on Diversity, Vox Media

    Mandy Brown, Director of Platform at Vox Media, and host Cameron Moll discuss diversity in the hiring process and why it’s so hard to do well.

    https://hired.fm/seasons/3/episodes/1

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Track Changes: The Web Is Dead

    This week Paul and Rich eulogize the web, which has been dying since its inception. They compare the early, organicmdays of the web with today’s trends towards massive commercial centralization. They also talk about Outbrain and Taboola (“20 slides spread over 400 pages”), Disqus and Facebook comment threads, and the hellscape that is wish.com, leading Rich to declare, “Maybe the web sucks! Maybe it should die!”

    http://trackchanges.libsyn.com/the-web-is-dead

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. BBC Radio 4 - Digital Human, Series 9, Taste

    Aleks Krotoski explores whether or not the digital world is changing food culture.

    Food is a universal necessity, human brains light up more for food than any other experience, so it’s little wonder that food culture has exploded online. Social media is festooned with pictures, recipes, cooking videos and we can’t seem to ever get enough.

    But, is the digital world doing more than getting our mouths watering? Could technology be changing the very way we taste?

    In this episode, Aleks Krotoski explores how food trends develop and shape our culture and spread on social media, as well as exploring new tech that may change the way we eat - from 3D printed delights, to Chef Watson who creates recipes in the cloud, and even how we might manipulate our brains to change how we perceive flavour.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b07756bg

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  6. Vox Ex Machina

    1939, an astonishing new machine debuted at the New York World’s Fair. It was called the “Voder,” short for “Voice Operating Demonstrator.” It looked sort of like a futuristic church organ.

    An operator — known as a “Voderette” — sat at the Voder’s curved wooden console with a giant speaker towering behind her. She faced an expectant audience, placed her hands on a keyboard in front of her, and then played something the world had never really heard before.

    A synthesized voice.

    http://99percentinvisible.org/episode/vox-ex-machina/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Agency Leadership with Andy Budd of Clearleft

    In this episode, we explore many agency leadership issues such as what it takes to solve large business problems with clients. One example you’ll hear is how Clearleft transformed Penguin Books recently.

    We also explore:

    • what is an agency,

    • why the CEO should be the least talented person in the agency,

    • finding the right team,

    • documenting your agency’s core values,

    • how to allow the client to become an engaged part of your agency’s team, and

    • how to grow slowly.

    http://www.spreaker.com/user/businessologyshow/agency-leadership-with-andy-budd-of-clea

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Longform Podcast #189: Maciej Ceglowski

    “My natural contrarianism makes me want to see if I can do something long-term in an industry where everything either changes until it’s unrecognizable or gets sold or collapses. I like the idea of things on the web being persistent. And more basically, I reject this idea that everything has to be on a really short time scale just because it involves technology. We’ve had these computers around for a while now. It’s time we start treating them like everything else in our lives, where it kind of lives on the same time scale that we do and doesn’t completely fall off the end of the world every three or four years.”

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Priyamvada Natarajan: Solving Dark Matter and Dark Energy - The Long Now

    The darkness of dark matter and dark energy

    All that we know of the universe we get from observing photons, Natarajan pointed out.

    But dark matter, which makes up 90 percent of the total mass in the universe, is called dark because it neither emits nor reflects photons—and because of our ignorance of what it is!

    It is conjectured to be made up of still-unidentified exotic collisionless particles which might weigh about six times more than an electron.

    Though some challenge whether dark matter even exists, Natarajan is persuaded that it does because of her research on “the heaviest objects in the universe“—galaxy clusters of more than 1,000 galaxies.

    First of all, the rotation of stars within galaxies does not look Keplerian—the outermost stars move far too quickly as discovered in the 1970s.

    Their rapid rate of motion only makes sense if there is a vast “halo” of dark matter enclosing each galaxy.

    And galaxy clusters have so much mass (90 percent of it dark) that their gravitation bends light, “lenses” it.

    A galaxy perfectly aligned on the far side of a galaxy cluster appears to us—via the Hubble Space Telescope—as a set of multiple arc-shaped (distorted) galaxy images.

    Studying the precise geometry of those images can reveal some of the nature of dark matter, such as that it appears to be “clumpy.”

    When the next-generation of space telescopes - the James Webb Space Telescope that comes online in 2018 and the WFIRST a few years afterward, much more will be learned.

    There are also instruments on Earth trying to detect dark-matter particles directly, so far without success.

    As for dark energy—the accelerating expansion of the universe—its shocking discovery came from two independent teams in 1998-99.

    Dark energy is now understood to constitute 72 percent of the entire contents of the universe.

    (Of the remainder, dark matter is 23 percent, and atoms—the part that we know—makes up just 4.6 percent.)

    But when the universe was just 380,000 years old (13.7 billion years ago), there was no dark energy.

    But now “the universe is expanding at a pretty fast clip.”

    Natarajan hopes to use galaxy-cluster lensing as a tool “to trace the geometry of space-time which encodes dark energy.”

    These days, she said, data is coming in from the universe faster than theory can keep up with it.

    ”We are in a golden age of cosmology.”

    —Stewart Brand

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02016/apr/11/solving-dark-matter-and-dark-energy/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. 1999: The Years That Changed The Internet

    To close out our 3 part series, we go back to 1999 and talk to the internet’s greatest monster: the man who invented Microsoft’s Clippy (jk he’s a really nice guy named Kevan Atteberry). We hear from the folks of Open Diary, one of the first social media/blogging sites and talk to Olia Lialina, who has been preserving and archiving Geocities sites. Katie and Ryan force Julia to read some erotic Clippy fanfic, but we need not speak of that.

    ===
    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/iexplorer/1999-the-years-that-changed
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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