boagworld / collective

There are two people in boagworld’s collective.

Huffduffed (3243)

  1. BBC Radio 4 - Desert Island Discs, Arthur C Clarke

    Roy Plomley’s castaway is science fiction writer Arthur C Clarke.

    Favourite track: Violin Concerto in B Minor by Edward Elgar

    Book: The Golden Treasury by Francis Palgrave

    Luxury: Solar-powered transistor radio

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p009mzgs

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. BBC Radio 4 - Desert Island Discs, James Burke

    The castaway this week is James Burke, whose broadcasting style has been described as "turning science into show-biz". But, paradoxically, he admits to being immensely impractical and reveals to Michael Parkinson, while choosing his eight records to take to the island, that he at one time planned to make music his career.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p009mgby

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. BBC Radio 4 - Desert Island Discs, Claudia Roden

    This week Sue Lawley’s castaway is the award-winning cookery writer Claudia Roden whose Book of Middle Eastern Food revolutionised Western attitudes to the cuisines of the Middle East. Her Book of Jewish Food has been described as ‘the richest and most sensuous encyclopaedia of Jewish life ever set in print’. She chooses eight records to take with her to the mythical island.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00948k7

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. BBC Radio 4 - Desert Island Discs, Margaret Atwood

    Sue Lawley’s castaway this week is the writer Margaret Atwood. Born just after the outbreak of the Second World War, Margaret Atwood spent much of her childhood in the Canadian outback where her father’s work involved studying insects. She grew up mostly without television, cinema, mains electricity or even a proper road to civilisation. For company she had only her parents and her brother, with whom she wrote "serials, mainly about space travel".

    It wasn’t until her teens that the urge to write struck seriously, an event she describes as "a large, invisible thumb descended from the sky and pressed down on the top of my head. A poem formed." After University, a spell in England and a period teaching early morning classes to engineering students she had her first novel, The Edible Woman, published. Since then she has written nine more novels, four of which were Booker nominated with The Blind Assassin finally winning in 2000. Three of those novels have been made into films: Surfacing, The Handmaid’s Tale and The Blind Assassin. She has also published some dozen books of poetry, five collections of short stories, four books for children and assorted non-fiction titles. Her latest novel, Oryx and Crake, set in a genetically engineered, post-apocalyptic landscape is published on May 5th this year.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00937l3

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. BBC Radio 4 - Desert Island Discs, Brian Aldiss

    Roy Plomley’s castaway is novelist and critic Brian Aldiss.

    Favourite track: Sonata In A by Franz Schubert

    Book: Rasselas by Dr Samuel Johnson

    Luxury: Time machine

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p009mksv

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. BBC Radio 4 - Desert Island Discs, Heston Blumenthal

    Kirsty Young’s castaway this week is the chef Heston Blumenthal. He is one of only three chefs working in Britain today to be awarded three Michelin stars and last year his restaurant, The Fat Duck, was named the best in the world by a panel of 5,000 food experts.

    His speedy rise to the top of his profession is little short of extraordinary. He has only ever spent a week in a professional kitchen and taught himself classical French cookery. He became fascinated by the science of cooking and has become the Willy Wonka of modern cuisine - dishes he’s created include mango and douglas fir puree, salmon poached with liquorice and, most famously, snail porridge. But he acknowledges his success has been largely due too to his wife’s support and now wants to change the balance of his life towards spending more time with his young family.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0093tyn

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Preserving the Architecture of the Web with Stefan Tilkov | The Web Ahead

    There’s a lot of pressure these days to use a JavaScript framework to create every website. “Which one is best?” people ask, “Which one should I use?” Stefan Tilkov joins Jen Simmons to talk about the architectural style of the web, and how to understand to best create an application on the web. What is the role of each of the technologies available?

    http://www.thewebahead.net/116

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. The Economist asks: Can the open web survive?

    Sir Tim Berners Lee founded the web in 1989, and is now the head of its standards agency, the W3C. He joins deputy editor Tom Standage in The Economist studio to discuss the future of his creation.

    ===
    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/theeconomist/the-economist-asks-can-the-open-web-survive
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. JavaScript Air | Progressive Web Apps

    Episode 024 of the live JavaScript broadcast podcast. A Progressive Web App "uses modern web capabilities to deliver an app-like user experience. They evolve from pages in browser tabs to immersive, top-level apps, leveraging the web’s low friction." The JavaScript Air website uses some of these techniques and technologies. Let’s learn about this awesome stuff!

    https://javascriptair.com/episodes/2016-05-25/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. 4: The Clock of The Long Now by Stewart Brand | @castig

    Part Four.

    http://castig.org/the-clock-of-the-long-now-by-stewart-brand/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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