bigskinnyboy / tags / typography

Tagged with “typography” (9)

  1. Simon Pascal Klein — Setting standards-​​friendly web type

    Web typog ra phy has in the past two years seen a resur gence in inter est and many would agree only rightly so, with most of the con tent on the web still tex tual. However the range of tech ni cal options avail able for set ting type on the web is quite broad—not to men tion the range of styl is tic choices available—and often con fus ing. This ses sion aims to demys tify the cur rent tech niques avail able to set type on the web by com par­ing and con trast ing the var i ous options at hand while offer ing a set of good defaults and safe advice for not only mak ing it acces si ble but also plea sur able to read.

    —Huffduffed by bigskinnyboy

  2. The Power and Beauty of Typography

    Web typography has come a long way, but how do you find inspiration to push your designs forward online? Letters can say far more than the words they spell.

    In her session, Samantha will look at the lettering surrounding us everyday, tapping into the way it makes us feel. If you don’t already get emotional about which font to use, you will, looking at letters in a whole new way and learning how to translate those feelings into your web designs.

    http://2010.dconstruct.org/speakers/samantha-warren

    Samantha Warren loves big concepts as much as she loves badass typography and thrives on telling interesting stories through usable interfaces. She has written articles for .net Magazine, regularly speaks at industry events and is on the Board of the Art Directors Club of Washington DC. When she is not doing any of the above you can find her enthusiastically teaching typography and web design at the Center for Digital Imaging Arts at Boston University.

    —Huffduffed by bigskinnyboy

  3. Mark Boulton — Designing grid systems

    Grid sys tems have been used in print design, archi tec ture and inte rior design for gen­er a tions. Now, on the web, the same rules of grid sys tem com po si tion and usage no longer apply. Content is viewed in many ways; from RSS feeds to email. Content is viewed on many devices; from mobile phones to lap tops. Users can manip u late the browser, they can remove con tent, resize the can vas, resize the type faces. A designer is no longer in con trol of this pre sen ta tion. So where do grid sys tems fit in to all that?

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/mark-boulton-designing-grid-systems/

    —Huffduffed by bigskinnyboy

  4. 80% Science, 20% Art

    Web typography is a toddler in the big bad world of competing displays, browsers and operating systems. Jon takes it by the hand, and discusses the science that comes before the art.

    It’ll be a celebration with lots of opportunity for questions and discourse. From exploring how fonts are rendered, to a quick refresher on typesetting and with a little history thrown in for good measure, it’s time to get your glyph on!

    —Huffduffed by bigskinnyboy

  5. Facing up to Fonts

    Browser support for the typographical aspects of CSS is gradually increasing. Things are on the up.

    Richard will be trouncing the myth of web-safe fonts, demonstrating how to go beyond bold, detailing the technicalities of font embedding and exploring the commercial and ethical minefield therein.

    The introduction of font embedding in particular is a long-awaited step in the right direction. However it brings with it a host of complications; technical, ethical and aesthetic.

    This session will explain all.

    —Huffduffed by bigskinnyboy

  6. Please Explain: Typography

    Our latest Please Explain is all about typefaces and typography. Typeface designer Jonathan Hoefler, type designer and president of Hoefler & Frere-Jones and Steven Heller, co-chair of the MFA Designer as Author program at the School of Visual Arts and author of the VISUALS column for the New York Times Book Review, will explain how typefaces are created and why typography is important to communication and design.

    —Huffduffed by bigskinnyboy