beverson / Ben

There are no people in beverson’s collective.

Huffduffed (98)

  1. The Incomparable | Fail Fast (Episode 197)

    We love Pixar, and we’re a bunch of creative professional types. So as you can imagine, we devoured “Creativity Inc.”, by Pixar president Ed Catmull. Is it a business book or an anti-business book? How do you foster creativity? Is Pixar’s formula one that provides safety while preventing works of staggering genius? How much is a director or writer the author of a Pixar movie, and how much is the studio itself? And is the wild success of “Frozen” proof of anything?

    http://www.theincomparable.com/theincomparable/197/index.php

    —Huffduffed by beverson

  2. Debug 37: Simmons, Wiskus, Gruber, and Vesper Sync | iMore

    Debug features the best developers in the business talking about the amazing apps they make and why and how they make them. On this episode Brent Simmons, Dave Wiskus, and John Gruber join Guy and Rene to talk about Vesper 2.0, architecting sync, the decision making process, design choices, and why Vesper for Mac comes next.

    http://m.imore.com/debug-37-simmons-wiskus-gruber-and-vesper-sync

    —Huffduffed by beverson

  3. Debug 32: John Siracusa on Copland 2014 | iMore

    John Siracusa of Hypercritical and the Accidental Tech Podcast shows up to fight with Guy over Copland 2014. That is, the idea that Apple needs to embrace elements of higher level languages and figure out what comes after Objective C.

    Subscribe in iTunes

    Subscribe in RSS

    Download directly

    Follow on Twitter

    http://m.imore.com/debug-32-john-siracusa-copland-2014

    —Huffduffed by beverson

  4. Here’s the Thing, Ep. #68: Jerry Seinfeld

    Monday, October 14, 2013

    Alec Baldwin sits down with comedian Jerry Seinfeld who debuted on HBO in 1981, the same year he first appeared on Johnny Carson. Jerry Seinfeld was 27 years old. Seinfeld’s material stood out. It wasn’t about his upbringing or personal relationships. It was about our universal experience of small things. Eight years after his HBO debut, he and Larry David created a weekly series that changed both their lives. After Seinfeld ran for nine seasons, Seinfeld went back to stand-up, and to his audience. As he explains to Alec, Seinfeld feels uniquely connected to his fans: “You have this relationship with the audience that is private between you and them. Critics want to write, people want to talk. We have our own thing that nobody can break … once you build that it can’t be broken by outside forces.”

    —Huffduffed by beverson

Page 1 of 10Older