babbage / Bob

There are no people in babbage’s collective.

Huffduffed (9)

  1. We’ll Always Have Zeppelins — The Incomparable

    Climb in your Zeppelin, grab a self-burning book, and prepare for the first Incomparable Podcast, in which we discuss "The City and The City," "The Windup Girl," "For The Win," and more. Plus we mispronounce the names of writers.

    The Incomparable Participants: Glenn Fleishman, Scott McNulty, Dan Moren, and Jason Snell. The Incomparable Theme Song composed by Christopher Breen.

    Prominently mentioned in this Incomparable episode:

    • "The City & The City" by China Miéville
    • "The Windup Girl" by Paolo Bacigalupi
    • "For the Win" by Cory Doctorow

    Also mentioned:

    • "Perdido Street Station" by China Miéville
    • "Little Brother" by Cory Doctorow
    • "Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom" by Cory Doctorow
    • "Boneshaker" by Cherie Priest
    • "The Gone-Away World" by Nick Harkaway
    • "Ship Breaker" by Paolo Bacigalupi
    • "Tongues of Serpents" by Naomi Novik
    • "The Dream of Perpetual Motion" by Dexter Palmer
    • "A Storm of Swords" by George R.R. Martin
    • "Oryx and Crake" by Margaret Atwood
    • "The Yiddish Policeman’s Union" by Michael Chabon
    • "Bitter Seeds" by Ian Tregillis
    • "The Adamantine Palace" by Stephen Deas
    • "Shades of Grey" by Jasper Fforde
    • "Fables" by Bill Willingham and Lan Medina

    http://www.theincomparable.com/2010/08/1-well-always-have-zeppelins-1.html

    —Huffduffed by babbage

  2. To The Best of Our Knowledge: The Universe

    Leonard Mlodinow and co-author Stephen Hawking say that you can explain the existence of everything without requiring God. Charles Yu’s novel details some of the perils of existence in multiple time streams. James Kakalios says that some of the early quantum physicists were inspired by science fiction. John Polkinghorne is the author of many books on the subject of bridging the gap between science and religion. Michio Kaku tells us exactly why the impossible just takes a little longer.

    —Huffduffed by babbage

  3. Arthur C. Clarke, Alvin Toffler, and Margaret Mead on Man’s Future

    What does the future look like from the past? This exciting program with three people that could not better represent the intelligentsia of futurism circa 1970. This recording is from a radio program called “Sound on Film”, a series on films and the people who make them. This episode is entitled “2001–Science Fiction or Man’s Future?” Recorded May 7th, 1970. Joseph Gelman is the moderator.

    At the time of this recording Arthur C. Clarke had recently collaborated on the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey with Stanley Kubrick. Alvin Toffler’s mega-influential book, Future Shock, is about to be published. And Margaret Mead is the world’s foremost cultural anthropologist.

    An intriguing conversation that still has relevance today.

    2001–Science Fiction or Man’s Future?

    Length–54:18

    http://www.sfoha.org/arthur-c-clarke-alvin-toffler-and-margaret-mead-on-mans-future/

    —Huffduffed by babbage