Tagged with “politics” (41)

  1. Greater Than Zero (Or, the Politics of Serious Games)

    An investigation into the surprising history of games designed to change our political values, from the radical origins of Monopoly to a brand-new spin on Pokémon GO created to mobilize swing state voters in the 2016 presidential campaign. Special guests: Jane McGonigal, Mary Pilon, and Asi Burak.

    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/wonderland-podcast/greater-than-zero-or-the-politics-of-purposeful-games
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Sun, 23 Oct 2016 10:02:14 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  2. Episode 01 :: Revisionist History Podcast

    Listen to “The Lady Vanishes” Episode 1 of The Revisionist History Podcast with Malcolm Gladwell.

    In the late 19th century, a painting by a virtually unknown artist took England by storm: The Roll Call. But after that brilliant first effort, the artist all but disappeared. Why?

    The Lady Vanishes explores the world of art and politics to examines the strange phenomenon of the “token”—the outsider whose success serves not to alleviate discrimination but perpetuate it. If a country elects a female president, does that mean the door is now open for all women to follow? Or does that simply give the status quo the justification to close the door again?


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  3. Decode DC Episode 90: Narwhal vs. Orca

    Once upon a time in the fairytale land of politics, there was an epic clash of magical beasts.

    On one side, the sea-unicorn called the narwhal. With a wave of his single tusk, he could muster thousands of volunteers, knock on millions of doors and direct a laser-beam of votes on behalf of Barack Obama.

    On the other side, the narwhal’s natural enemy, the orca, tasked with unearthing voters across the realm for challenger Mitt Romney. This may sound too fantastical to believe, but it’s actually closer to reality than you think.

    The presidential race of 2012 did indeed see such a contest, between the President’s Project Narwhal team and Mitt Romney’s Project Orca. But the contest wasn’t waged on Middle Earth, it was waged online, by Silicon Valley hackers wielding the power of…database computing.

    For many, the showdown between the two digital camps came to symbolize the growing and dominant role technology has come to play in today’s politics. But that story is, well, a fairy tale, according to the man behind Project Narwhal.

    “It wasn’t technology. The answer was that we had a great field team and we had good volunteers and our grassroots was on point ,” says Harper Reed, former Chief Technology Officer for President Obama’s 2012 campaign. “We raised all the money and the finance team did this really great work. Technology just helped a little bit to make some of that stuff faster.”

    On this week’s podcast, host Andrea Seabrook sits with Harper Reed to recount a story that ended up being too good to be true, about a Narwhal, an Orca, and the real magic behind campaigns that help a candidate’s dreams come true.


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  4. re:publica 2015 - James Bridle: Living in the Electromagnetic Spectrum

    Find out more at: http://re-publica.de/session/living-electromagnetic-spectrum

    Artist and writer James Bridle explores how politics is manifested in technology, and how the the things we build shape the world in unexpected ways. In particular, he will detail the ways in which networks and communications affect notions of citizenship in the 21st Century, as explored in his recent art works and writings.

    James Bridle http://booktwo.org/

    Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Germany (CC BY-SA 3.0 DE)

    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4LM2V5wOxSY
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

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  5. Four Thought — Paola Antonelli: Art, design and politics

    Paola Antonelli explores the politics in art and design.


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  6. Valley Of The Meatpuppets

    The Valley of the Meatpuppets is an ethereal space where people, agents, thingbots, action heroes and big dogs coexist. In this new habitat, we are forming complex relationships with nebulous surveillance systems, machine intelligences and architectures of control, confronting questions about our freedom and capacity to act under invisible constraints.


    Anab Jain is the founder and director of Superflux, an Anglo-Indian design practice based in London, but with roots and contacts in the Gujarati city of Ahmedabad.

    Their work is one-half consultancy, one-half research …into The Future! Well, more like The Present Which Looks A Lot Like The Future.

    Anab is a TED fellow, her work has been shown at the MoMA, she is a guest lecturer at the RCA, and she has spoken at conferences like SIGGRAPH and NEXT. That’s a lot of initialisms.

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  7. Politics of Science Fiction - Kim Stanley Robinson

    Kim Stanley Robinson, author of the "Mars" trilogy, "2312," and "Shaman," has been called our greatest living science fiction writer AND one of the greatest political novelists.  He writes post-capitalist page-turners set in the far future and the distant past. We talk with him about the politics of science and the imagination.


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  8. Gabriella Coleman on the ethics of free software

    Gabriella Coleman, the Wolfe Chair in Scientific and Technological Literacy in the Art History and Communication Studies Department at McGill University, discusses her new book, “Coding Freedom: The Ethics and Aesthetics of Hacking,” which has been released under a Creative Commons license.

    Coleman, whose background is in anthropology, shares the results of her cultural survey of free and open source software (F/OSS) developers, the majority of whom, she found, shared similar backgrounds and world views. Among these similarities were an early introduction to technology and a passion for civil liberties, specifically free speech.

    Coleman explains the ethics behind hackers’ devotion to F/OSS, the social codes that guide its production, and the political struggles through which hackers question the scope and direction of copyright and patent law. She also discusses the tension between the overtly political free software movement and the “politically agnostic” open source movement, as well as what the future of the hacker movement may look like.


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  9. Hardtalk: Thomas Drake

    Stephen Sackur talks to Thomas Drake, a former senior executive at the highly-secretive National Security Agency in the US. His life changed when he decided to become a whistle-blower and leak to the media his concerns about the way in which the NSA was developing its surveillance strategy inside the United States. He became the subject of a long-running investigation which threatened to see him locked up for much of the rest of his life. His home was raided, his computers analysed, and he became a key figure in a wider Obama Administration drive to crackdown on leakers within the national security system. For Thomas Drake that meant years of anguish and uncertainty; but did he deserve it?


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  10. Assange: Governments ‘aspire to god-like knowledge’

    WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange speaks on the subject of knowledge, and its relationship with power.


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