Tagged with “software” (31)

  1. Standards, Declarative Code, and Tape Decks, with John Allsopp | Fixate

    Published Mar 15, 2018

    John has been building for the web since the early 90’s. With his timeless article, The Dao of Web Design, his book, Developing with Web Standards, and as co-founder of the Web Directions conference series, John has made a massive impact on the lives of designers and developers the world over.

    Time Stamped Show Notes

    0:51 – John came to the web from a computer science and software engineering background.

    1:14 – In the early nineties, John developed a hypertext knowledge system. Whilst considering his options on how best to distribute the software, he realised that the internet would be a great fit. No publisher required, and no tiny royalties!

    1:43 – At the beginning, John thought the web was a fad.

    2:08 – The web was officially launched in 1991 but received a lot of criticism at the time. Users complained that links were one-directional, and that there was no centralised hub to see the links between documents. In fact, a paper proposed by Tim Berners-Lee (the man considered to be the inventor of the web) was rejected!

    2:58 – What people initially saw as weaknesses of the web, actually turned out to be its strengths. One “weakness” was the fact that everything was freely available to everybody; even people who are not software engineers or programmers.

    3:31 – Once John realised the power of the web, he started to develop courses, and CSS tools, training, and materials. In more recent years, his efforts have been focused on organising conferences where he helps “amplify the voices and ideas of other people”.

    4:54 – John is interested in the way humans interact with computers and how this will evolve over time. He wants to see the current paradigm of “personal computing” broken down and become less text and screen-based.

    7:43 – The idea of a computer as a bunch of apps with various features will change; our interactions will become much more contextual and unique to our individual conditions. Computing will become more and more a part of our everyday life. John gives two examples – cochlear implants, and technology that can predict the onset of a psychological episode.

    8:55 – John believes that if you can programme in JavaScript and can use a web API, you can start tapping into the AI API’s of Amazon Web Services, Watson, or the Google Cloud Platform.

    11:53 – “Debugging is a black art.”

    12:57 – John tells the story of a single missing character in Fortran code and how it lead to an unmanned space shuttle exploding!

    13:47 – When deciding what to put where on his daily todo list, John considers the task’s importance, as well as the times of day during which he is most productive. He finds that todo lists give him a sense of accomplishment and progression.

    14:55 – “People who show gratitude tend to be happy.” John encourages his kids to reflect on one thing each day for which they are thankful.

    16:08 – When making the transition from developing software to running events, John had to begin a completely new learning process.

    19:19 – John is interested in using his expertise to gain better insight into the wants and needs of his customers so that he can tailor the Web Directions service to better suit them.

    20:22 – John started programming using BASIC on a “pre-PC style” computer. It relied on a tape deck with audio cassettes in order to write programs.

    20:57 – John came from a very traditional, imperative, object-orientated approach to programming. Only when the web came around was he exposed to the declarative approach.

    21:29 – John found the idea of declaring what you want to happen, rather than how you want it to happen, revelatory.

    21:57 – John thinks CSS is greatly undervalued. Whereas experienced React developers are in high demand, skilled CSS developers seem to struggle to find good positions.

    22:29 – John believes Javascript developers would benefit from trying to understand the declarative approach of CSS and HTML.

    Quickfire Questions

    23:45 – Best advice about programming

    “You ain’t gonna need it” (YAGNI). If you don’t need it, don’t build it.

    24:15 – Habits for writing better code

    A strange mixture of OCD and ADHD allows John to both drill down on the details and get them right, as well as make the disparate connections necessary for writing good software.

    25:15 – Book“Designing with Web Standards” by Jeffrey Zeldman

    26:19 – Inspiring devsJason Miller, the creator of Preact. Not only is he developing interesting technology, but he is also great at articulating his thoughts on the web platform as a whole.

    27:33 – How to learn to code from scratch

    Pick a real-world problem and learn new technologies as you solve it.

    29:42 – How to work smart

    Implement the 80/20 rule. Determine what requires only 20% effort, but yields 80% of the results.

    Tools, Tips, and Books Mentioned

    JavaScript

    “A Dao of Web Design,” by John Allsopp

    “Developing with Web Standards,” by John Allsopp

    The Web Directions conference series

    Amazon Web Services Machine Learning API

    Watson AI API

    Google Cloud Platform AI API

    Fortran

    Web Directions

    BASIC

    CSS

    ReactJS

    Dijkstra’s books on software engineering

    “Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software,” by The Gang of Four

    Axel Rauschmayer’s books on JavaScript

    Kyle Simpson’s books on JavaScript

    “Designing with Web Standards” by Jeffrey Zeldman

    Preact

    Tim Ferris

    The 80/20 Pareto Principle

    Contact John

    Twitter: @johnallsopp

    http://fixate.it/podcast/standards-declarative-code-tape-decks-john-allsopp/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. CHM Live│Programmed Inequality

    According to the National Center for Women & Information Technology, women held just 25 percent of professional computing jobs in the US in 2015. How damaging is this gender gap to the future of the tech industry?

    The rise and fall of Britain’s electronic computing industry between 1944–1974 holds clues. In her book, Programmed Inequality: How Britain Discarded Women Technologists and Lost Its Edge in Computing, historian Marie Hicks explores how gender discrimination, changing labor demographics, and government policy during this 30-year period shaped the UK’s path in computing. She also explains how this path had detrimental economic effects on the UK—and why the US may be facing similar risks today.

    Dr. Marie Hicks sits down with David C. Brock, Director of the Museum’s Center for Software History, to share insights from her book.

    Hicks received her BA from Harvard University and her MA and PhD from Duke University. Before entering academia, she worked as a UNIX systems administrator. She is currently an assistant professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her work focuses on how gender and sexuality bring hidden technological dynamics to light and how women’s experiences change the core narratives of the history of computing.

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WTLJ7saIV3o
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Sat, 13 Jan 2018 10:50:18 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Zeynep Tufekci: Machine intelligence makes human morals more important | TED Talk | TED.com

    Machine intelligence is here, and we’re already using it to make subjective decisions. But the complex way AI grows and improves makes it hard to understand and even harder to control. In this cautionary talk, techno-sociologist Zeynep Tufekci explains how intelligent machines can fail in ways that don’t fit human error patterns — and in ways we won’t expect or be prepared for. "We cannot outsource our responsibilities to machines," she says. "We must hold on ever tighter to human values and human ethics."

    https://www.ted.com/talks/zeynep_tufekci_machine_intelligence_makes_human_morals_more_important

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. The Compiler—50 Things That Made the Modern Economy

    Installing Windows might take 5,000 years without the compiler, a remarkable innovation which made modern computing possible. Tim Harford tells a compelling story which has at its heart a pioneering woman called Grace Hopper who – along the way – single-handedly invented the idea of open source software too.

    The compiler evolved into COBOL – one of the first computer languages – and led to the distinction between hardware and software.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04n04cm

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Dame Stephanie Shirley: How Do You Break Into an Industry While Breaking All the Rules? : NPR

    What’s in a name? For tech entrepreneur Dame Stephanie Shirley, bidding contracts under the name "Steve" enabled her to launch and grow a freelance software company with a virtually all-female staff.

    http://www.npr.org/2015/10/02/443437169/how-do-you-break-into-an-industry-while-breaking-all-the-rules

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Why Are Computers 1: A Fairly Deep Yak Shave

    James Coglan talks about the lengthy process of creating Terminus and Faye, thinking through coding, software as argument, maintaining open source projects, JavaScript in web apps, and his upcoming JavaScript testing book.

    http://whyarecomputers.com/1

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. “Uncle” Bob Martin - “The Future of Programming”

    How did our industry start, what paths did it take to get to where we are, and where is it going. What big problems did programmers encounter in the past? How were they solved? And how do those solutions impact our future? What mistakes have we made as a profession; and how are we going to correct them. In this talk, Uncle Bob describes the history of software, from it’s beginnings in 1948 up through the current day; and then beyond. By looking at our past trajectory, we try to plot out where our profession is headed, and what challenges we’ll face along the way.

    Robert C. Martin (Uncle Bob) has been a programmer since 1970. He is the Master Craftsman at 8th Light inc, an acclaimed speaker at conferences worldwide, and the author of many books including: The Clean Coder, Clean Code, Agile Software Development: Principles, Patterns, and Practices, and UML for Java Programmers.

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ecIWPzGEbFc
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Mon, 21 Nov 2016 11:33:42 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. 47: Sara Soueidan - Ditching Icon Fonts for SVG | Full Stack Radio

    In this episode, Adam talks to Sara Soueidan about the benefits of using SVG over icon fonts, and the best workflow for using SVG in your projects.

    http://www.fullstackradio.com/47

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. 181: The Cathedral and the Bazaar - ShopTalk

    This week we talk through the essay The Cathedral and the Bazaar. Can ideas and rules written about software development in 1997 apply to working on the web 18 years later? The answer may surprise you.

    http://shoptalkshow.com/episodes/181-the-cathedral-and-the-bazaar/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. 5by5 | Overtired #1: Overtired’s Maiden Voyage

    Brett and Christina test the waters of their new podcast, chatting about a range of topics from the upcoming "The Internet’s Own Boy" to late night Wikipedia rabbit holes.

    http://5by5.tv/overtired/1

    —Huffduffed by merlinmann

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