atheris

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Huffduffed (23)

  1. /Filmcast Ep. 342 - Spotlight – /Film

    David, Devindra, and Jeff discuss the martial arts brilliance of Into the Badlands, the hilarity of W/ Bob and David, and David’s crazy adventures in Chicago. Be sure to read Tasha’s review of #allmymovies, and Alyssa Rosenberg’s review of Spotlight (contains spoilers). You can always e-mail us at slashfilmcast(AT)gmail(DOT)com, or call and leave a voicemail at …

    https://www.slashfilm.com/filmcast-ep-342-spotlight/

    —Huffduffed by atheris

  2. An Astronaut, a Catalan, and Two Linguists Walk Into a Bar… (Ep. 343) - Freakonomics Freakonomics

    In this live episode of “Tell Me Something I Don’t Know,” we learn why New York has skinny skyscrapers, how to weaponize water, and what astronauts talk about in space. Joining Stephen J. Dubner as co-host is the linguist John McWhorter; Bari Weiss (The New York Times) is the real-time fact-checker.

    http://freakonomics.com/podcast/tmsidk-2018/

    —Huffduffed by atheris

  3. Has Lance Armstrong Finally Come Clean? (Ep. 342) - Freakonomics Freakonomics

    He was once the most lionized athlete on the planet, with seven straight Tour de France wins and a victory over cancer too. Then the doping charges caught up with him. When he finally confessed to Oprah, he admits, “it didn’t go well at all.” That’s because he wasn’t actually contrite yet. Now, five years later, he says he is. Do you believe him?

    http://freakonomics.com/podcast/lance-armstrong/

    —Huffduffed by atheris

  4. Why We Choke Under Pressure (and How Not To) - Freakonomics Freakonomics

    It happens to just about everyone, whether you’re going for Olympic gold or giving a wedding toast. We hear from psychologists, economists, and the golfer who some say committed the greatest choke of all time.

    http://freakonomics.com/podcast/choking/

    —Huffduffed by atheris

  5. People Aren’t Dumb. The World Is Hard. - Freakonomics Freakonomics

    You wouldn’t think you could win a Nobel Prize for showing that humans tend to make irrational decisions. But that’s what Richard Thaler has done. The founder of behavioral economics describes his unlikely route to success; his reputation for being lazy; and his efforts to fix the world — one nudge at a time.

    http://freakonomics.com/podcast/richard-thaler/

    —Huffduffed by atheris

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