asm / tags / ar

Tagged with “ar” (5)

  1. The War for the Web

    Tim O’Reilly Web 2.0 Conference 23 minutes, 11mb, recorded 2009-11-17

    The early days of the internet were truly astonishing. As people came to comprehend the power of networked information, they seized the many opportunities for innovation created by the open architecture of the web. Of course, the browser wars also showed that threats to openness and interoperability were a real danger. Today, Tim O’Reilly worries that escalating competition between large companies and closed platforms may drive the web towards a battle ground of locked down services and proprietary data.

    As large, powerful players have emerged on the internet landscape, you don’t have to look far to see some troubling skirmishes between opposing forces. O’Reilly touches on several examples where well known web applications include features designed to limit flexibility and user choice. To some extent, limits may be necessary to protect privacy, but in some cases, there is clear intent to lock in users at the expense of the competition. The situation is even more extreme in the mobile arena.

    Will the large companies play by the cherished rules of the open web as we’ve known it? It may depend on how "the cloud" grows. As web service companies such as Amazon, Google, Apple and Microsoft make O’Reilly’s notion of the web 2.0 "internet as a platform" a reality, they will have choices on how to maneuver. There is pressure for the giants to forge alliances, and leverage unique services as weapons to gain competitive advantage in the marketplace. But, history has shown that internet success often comes if you "do what you do best, link to the rest". O’Reilly urges companies to stick to their core strengths, maintain an open architecture, and embrace the "small pieces loosely joined" philosophy.

    From: http://itc.conversationsnetwork.org/shows/detail4317.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed

    —Huffduffed by asm

  2. Don Watson on the Absurdity of Corporate Speak

    Powerpoint presentations, key performance indicators and mission statements. Do they make our businesses and institutions run more efficiently, or are they irritating and faddish, not just devoid of meaning, but actually obstructive of clear communication? In his new book, "Bendable Learnings", there is no doubt what Don Watson thinks. In this laugh-out-loud talk at the ANU, he outlines his argument for why we need to avoid the ridiculous confusion of corporate language.

    —Huffduffed by asm

  3. NPR All Things Considered on China & Google

    First up, we have commentary from NPR’s All Things Considered. Although NPR’s reporter Laura Sydell said the attacks couldn’t be pinned directly on the Chinese government just yet, she did get to speak directly to Google’s SVP David Drummond, who makes an appearance in this podcast. Sydell also spoke to Gregory Nojeim of the Center for Democracy and Technology and Jonathan Zittrain of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard, who discuss the involvement of authoritarian governments in online activities.

    From http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/friday_podcast_parade_google_china_told_by_folks_w.php

    —Huffduffed by asm

  4. SitePoint Podcast #44: HTML5 is a (Beautiful) Mess

    Episode 44 of The SitePoint Podcast is now available! This week, Kevin Yank (@sentience) is joined by Opera Software’s Bruce Lawson (@brucel), SitePoint author Ian Lloyd (@lloydi), and Kyle Weems (@cssquirrel), creator of the CSSquirrel web comic, to discuss the latest uproar from within the W3C HTML5 Working Group. Is progress towards the HTML5 standard at risk of derailing, or is this just par for the course in the wild, wild world of standards development?

    http://www.sitepoint.com/blogs/2010/01/15/podcast-44-html5-is-a-beautiful-mess/

    —Huffduffed by asm