andrewski / Andrew Conkling

There are no people in andrewski’s collective.

Huffduffed (40)

  1. Why Are New Parents Depressed?

    New parents and depression.

    Moms and dads.

    There’s new research. We’ll unpack it.

    http://onpoint.wbur.org/?p=44831

    —Huffduffed by andrewski

  2. Pulling the Curtain: Voting in America - BackStory with the American History Guys

    Elections are at the very foundation of our democracy, but voter turnout in the last presidential election was only about 57 percent. It’s easy to be nostalgic for the Gilded Age era of 80 percent voter turnout… until you consider all the people who weren’t eligible to vote back then. Then again, for more than a century, one class of people who don’t vote today were allowed to vote: non-US citizens. On this special Election Day episode of BackStory, the History Guys put current voting trends in historical perspective. They also consider the changing mechanisms of voting, and look at the how for much of American history, the electoral college system maintained racial hierarchies in the South. And, as always, they field calls from listeners interested in exploring the history of voting in America.

    —Huffduffed by andrewski

  3. Early and Often: Voting in America - BackStory with the American History Guys

    Although the memory of hanging chads still clouds the electoral mood, elections have come a long way. But how effective is our current system? Does it accurately register the will of the People? And why did Americaâs founders opt out of direct democracy? With the help of callers, the History Guys provide the backstory on voting rights, mechanisms, and manipulations. Historian Mark Summers describes some of the hijinks common in Gilded Age politics, and historian Alexander Keyssar helps make sense of the Electoral College. (To listen to more episodes, please visit http://www.backstoryradio.org)

    —Huffduffed by andrewski

  4. Laboratories of Democracy: Backstory with the American History Guys

    In its early years, the U.S. wasn’t so much "United" as "States." Over time, the federal government has become more powerful, but states have continued to assert their independence on everything from gun control to medical marijuana. In this hour, we ask: If we’re all Americans, why do states still matter? Pennsylvania Governor Ed Rendell describes how his state has left the feds in the dust when it comes to climate change policy. Historian Eric Foner discusses the successes and failures of the 14th Amendment, created to protect us from the states. And a long-haul trucker explains why she’d like to do away with states altogether.

    —Huffduffed by andrewski

  5. Laboratories of Democracy: The State of the States

    In its early years, the U.S. wasn’t so much “United” as “States.” Over time, the federal government has become more powerful, but states have continued to assert their independence on everything from gun control to medical marijuana. In this hour, we ask: If we’re all Americans, why do states still matter? Pennsylvania Governor Ed Rendell describes how his state has left the feds in the dust when it comes to climate change policy. Historian Eric Foner discusses the successes and failures of the 14th Amendment, created to protect us from the states. And a long-haul trucker explains why she’d like to do away with states altogether.

    —Huffduffed by andrewski

  6. Early and Often: BackStory with the American History Guys

    Although the memory of hanging chads still clouds the electoral mood, elections have come a long way. But how effective is our current system? Does it accurately register the will of the People? And why did America’s founders opt out of direct democracy? With the help of callers, the History Guys provide the backstory on voting rights, mechanisms, and manipulations. Historian Mark Summers describes some of the hijinks common in Gilded Age politics, and historian Alexander Keyssar helps make sense of the Electoral College.

    http://backstoryradio.org/shows/early-and-often-voting-in-america-2/

    —Huffduffed by andrewski

  7. Pulling the Curtain: Voting in America (BackStory with the American History Guys)

    Elections are at the very foundation of our democracy, but voter turnout in the last presidential election was only about 57 percent. It’s easy to be nostalgic for the Gilded Age era of 80 percent voter turnout… until you consider all the people who weren’t eligible to vote back then. Then again, for more than a century, one class of people who don’t vote today were allowed to vote: non-US citizens. On this special Election Day episode of BackStory, the History Guys put current voting trends in historical perspective. They also consider the changing mechanisms of voting, and look at the how for much of American history, the electoral college system maintained racial hierarchies in the South. And, as always, they field calls from listeners interested in exploring the history of voting in America.

    http://backstoryradio.org/shows/pulling-the-curtain-voting-in-america/

    —Huffduffed by andrewski

  8. interviewed Kjartan

    Huffduffed from http://www.npr.org/blogs/bryantpark/2007/10/when_good_interviews_go_bad.html

    —Huffduffed by andrewski

  9. Why We Love iOS 7 and You’re Wrong - Let’s Make Mistakes - Mule Radio Syndicate

    http://www.muleradio.net/mistakes/96/

    —Huffduffed by andrewski

  10. All the Flavor You Can Handle - Unprofessional - Mule Radio Syndicate

    http://www.muleradio.net/unprofessional/18/

    —Huffduffed by andrewski

Page 1 of 4Older