andr3 / collective

There are four people in andr3’s collective.

Huffduffed (5041)

  1. #193: Conferences - CodePen Blog

    Cassidy, Klare, and Marie are on this episode to talk about going to a conference and how to get the most out of it. They also compare conference prep styles.

    https://blog.codepen.io/2018/10/02/193-conferences/

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  2. 352: Caching, Service Workers, and Javascript with Scott Jehl - ShopTalk

    Scott Jehl is our guest and we’re talking about accessibility, jQuery history, progressive enhancement in modern javascript, critical CSS, service workers, maintenance of a server, and other fun stuff.

    https://shoptalkshow.com/episodes/352/

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  3. Ep 4 Laura Kalbag – The Elastic Brand

    In this episode Laura and Liz discuss

    Ethical brand designToxic technology and dark patterns

    The need for tech industry diversity.

    Accessibility and inclusivity.

    How we can be more ethical as designers.

    How we need to make sure we are working with ethical companies

    http://theelasticbrand.com/episode/ep-4-laura-kalbag/

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  4. 055: What Recruiters Want with Andy Budd | User Defenders podcast

    Andy Budd reveals what the hiring minds of companies are really thinking. He answers how to navigate the recruitment process and presents an invaluable insight that shows how to subvert it altogether. He urges us to be more of who we are and to recognize that each of us has unique talents that are fit for the right organizations at the right time. He also emphasizes that it’s up to each job seeker to communicate their personal value if they want to land the job of their dreams.

    https://userdefenders.com/podcast/055-what-recruiters-want-with-andy-budd/

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  5. Babbage: Pioneers of the WWW | Babbage from Economist Radio on acast

    Kenneth Cukier gets in the Babbage time machine and travels to 1989, when Sir Tim Berners-Lee wrote the famous memo that laid the foundations for the world wide web. Kenn speaks to some of the other key figures that influenced its invention, like Ted Nelson and Vint Cerf, and then asks what the WWW might look like in the future.

    https://play.acast.com/s/theeconomistbabbage/babbage-pioneersofthewww

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  6. Alex Wright: Glut: Mastering Information Though the Ages - The Long Now

    A Series of Information Explosions

    As usual, microbes led the way.

    Bacteria have swarmed in intense networks for 3.5 billion years.

    Then a hierarchical form emerged with the first nucleated cells that were made up of an enclosed society of formerly independent organisms.

    That’s the pattern for the evolution of information, Alex Wright said.

    Networks coalesce into hierarchies, which then form a new level of networks, which coalesce again, and so on.

    Thus an unending series of information explosions is finessed.

    In humans, classification schemes emerged everywhere, defining how things are connected in larger contexts.

    Researchers into “folk taxonomies” have found that all cultures universally describe things they care about in hierarchical layers, and those hierarchies are usually five layers deep.

    Family tree hierarchies were accorded to the gods, who were human-like personalities but also represented various natural forces.

    Starting 30,000 years ago the “ice age information explosion” brought the transition to collaborative big game hunting, cave paintings, and elaborate decorative jewelry that carried status information.

    It was the beginning of information’s “release from social proximity.”

    5,000 years ago in Sumer, accountants began the process toward writing, beginning with numbers, then labels and lists, which enabled bureaucracy.

    Scribes were just below kings in prestige.

    Finally came written narratives such as Gilgamesh.

    The move from oral culture to literate culture is profound.

    Oral is additive, aggregative, participatory, and situational, where literate is subordinate, analytic, objective, and abstract.

    (One phenomenon of current Net culture is re-emergence of oral forms in email, twittering, YouTube, etc.)

    Wright honored the sequence of information-ordering visionaries who brought us to our present state.

    In 1883 Charles Cutter devised a classification scheme that led in part to the Library of Congress system and devised an apparatus of keyboard and wires that would fetch the desired book.

    H.G. Wells proposed a “world brain” of data and imagined that it would one day wake up.

    Teilhard de Chardin anticipated an “etherization of human consciousness” into a global noosphere.

    The greatest unknown revolutionary was the Belgian Paul Otlet.

    In 1895 he set about freeing the information in books from their bindings.

    He built a universal decimal classification and then figured out how that organized data could be explored, via “links” and a “web.”

    In 1910 Otlet created a “radiated library” called the Mundameum in Brussels that managed search queries in a massive way until the Nazis destroyed the service.

    Alex Wright showed an astonishing video of how Otlet’s distributed telephone-plus-screen system worked.

    Wright concluded with the contributions of Vannevar Bush (”associative trails” in his Memex system), Eugene Garfield’s Science Citation Index, the predecessor of page ranking.

    Doug Engelbart’s working hypertext system in the “mother of all demos.”

    And Ted Nelson who helped inspire Engelbart and Berners-Lee and who Wright considers “directly responsible for the generation of the World Wide Web.”

    —Stewart Brand

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02007/aug/17/glut-mastering-information-though-the-ages/

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  7. John Brockman: Possible Minds - The Long Now

    John Brockman’s newly released book Possible Minds: Twenty-Five Ways of Looking at AI  is the springboard for this Seminar on Artificial Intelligence. Brockman will interview several of the contributors to the book, Rodney Brooks, Alison Gopnik and Stuart Russell on stage. Following the interviews, Kevin Kelly will host the Q&A and discussion with the group.

    John Brockman is founder and publisher of the online salon Edge.org, a website devoted to discussions of cutting-edge science by many of the world’s foremost thinkers, the leaders of what he has termed "the third culture."

    Rodney Brooks is a computer scientist and roboticist, former Director (1997-2007) of the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and founder of Rethink Robotics and iRobot Corp.

    Alison Gopnik is a professor of psychology and affiliate professor of philosophy at the University of California at Berkeley. Her areas of expertise are in cognitive and language development, with specialties in the effect of language on thought, the development of a theory of mind, and causal learning.

    Stuart Russell is a computer scientist focused on artificial intelligence and computational physiology. He is a Professor of Computer Science at the University of California, Berkeley and Adjunct Professor of Neurological Surgery at the University of California, San Francisco.Kevin Kelly is a Long Now Board member, founding executive editor of Wired magazine, and a former editor/publisher of the Whole Earth Review. He is a writer, photographer, conservationist, and editor and publisher of the Cool Tools website.

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02019/feb/25/possible-minds/

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  8. What if women built the internet?

    All the things we love on the internet — from websites that give us information to services that connect us — are made stronger when their creators come with different points of view. With this in mind, we asked ourselves and our guests: “What would the internet look like if it was built by mostly women?”

    Witchsy founders Kate Dwyer and Penelope Gazin start us off with a story about the stunt they had to pull to get their site launched — and counter the sexist attitudes they fought against along the way. Brenda Darden Wilkerson recalls her life in tech in the 80s and 90s, and shares her experience leading AnitaB.org, an organization striving to get more women hired in tech. Coraline Ada Ehmke created the Contributor Covenant, a voluntary code of conduct being increasingly adopted by the open source community. She explains why she felt it necessary, and how it’s been received; and Mighty Networks CEO Gina Bianchini rolls her eyes at being called a “lady CEO,” and tells us why diversifying the boardroom is great for business and innovation.

    https://irlpodcast.org/season4/episode7/

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  9. Kim Stanley Robinson: Valuing the Earth and Future Generations: Imagining Post-Capitalism

    Climate change and population growth will combine in the twenty-first century to put an enormous load on humanity’s bio-infrastructural support system, the planet Earth. Kim Stanley Robinson argues that our current economic system undervalues both the environment and future human generations, and it will have to change if we hope to succeed in dealing with the enormous challenges facing us. Science is the most powerful conceptual system we have for dealing with the world, and we are certain to be using science to design and guide our response to the various crises now bearing down on us. A more scientific economics — what would that look like? And what else in our policy, habits, and values will have to change?

    Winner of Hugo, Nebula and Locus Awards, Kim Stanley Robinson is best known for his award-winning Mars trilogy. He has published fifteen novels and several short stories collections, often exploring ecological and sociological themes. Recently, the US National Science Foundation has sent Robinson to Antarctica as part of their Antarctic Artists and Writers Program. In April 2011, Robinson presented his observations on the cyclical nature of capitalism at the Rethinking Capitalism conference, University of California, Santa Cruz. In 1984, he published his doctoral dissertation, The N…

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Csvroehk7Ww
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  10. Exploring Creativity with Ursula K. Le Guin

    An interview with Ursula K. Le Guin by TVAP (The Video Access Project) / The Creative Outlet, Inc.

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M73cyc9lhhI
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Sun, 10 Mar 2019 00:15:04 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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