Charles Fracchia on a new breed of biologists - O’Reilly Radar

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  1. Matthew Berggren on making electronics accessible - O’Reilly Radar

    Subscribe to the O'Reilly Hardware Podcast for insight and analysis about the Internet of Things and the worlds of hardware, software, and manufacturing. In our new episode of the…

    http://radar.oreilly.com/2016/01/matthew-berggren-on-making-electronics-accessible.html

    —Huffduffed by agileone

  2. Rachel Kalmar on data ecosystems - O’Reilly Radar

    In this new episode of the Hardware Podcast, David Cranor and I talk with data scientist Rachel Kalmar, formerly with Misfit Wearables and the founder and organizer of the Sensored Meetup in San Francisco. She shares insights from her work at the intersection of data, hardware, and health care.

    http://radar.oreilly.com/2016/02/rachel-kalmar-on-data-ecosystems.html

    —Huffduffed by albill

  3. CodeNewbie: From Software to Hardware with Sara Chipps

    It started at a conference. When Sara Chipps sat in the audience and watched a speaker use JavaScript to interact with a smoke detector, she was entranced. She left with a bag of LEDs, and a new love for hardware that led to her ultimately starting her hardware company Jewliebots. She talks to us about her transition from software developer to hardware CEO, the differences she's seen between building software and hardware, and what it's like to build a product for teenage girls.

    http://www.codenewbie.org/podcast/from-software-to-hardware

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  4. On Point: George Church and Synthetic Biology

    Synthetic biology can sound kind of bland. Like polyester pants. Nylon stockings. Synthetic – no big deal.

    But think about it. Synthetic biology. Biology fully, deeply, maybe radically remade by man. It’s well underway.

    Re-engineering biology to make food, fuel, medicine. Seeds that grow into houses. Stronger, smarter humans. Maybe even bring back the dead. The extinct

    My guest today has written about finding an “extremely adventurous” woman to give birth to a Neanderthal. And he’s not kidding.

    This hour, On Point: synthetic biology creating new and very old life.

    http://onpoint.wbur.org/2013/01/23/synthetic-biology

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  5. What are the risks of DIY synthetic biology?

    Last week an editorial in the journal Science raised important questions about the safety of synthetic biology. In particular, it asked whether we can ensure safe practices in the more shady research arenas, such as the DIY synthetic biology movements.

    In 2014, the European Commission defined synthetic biology as, "the application of science, technology and engineering to facilitate and accelerate the design, manufacture and modification of genetic materials in living organisms".

    It was followed last month by a draft opinion from the commission's scientific committees that focuses on risks in synthetic biology. Specifically, it asked whether the methods used to assess the potential risks of the field were sufficient.

    To discuss the implications, Ian Sample is joined by Nicola Davis, commissioning editor of Observer Tech Monthly, and Professor Paul Freemont from Imperial College, London, who is co-director of its Centre for Synthetic Biology and Innovation. Dr Filippa Lentzos from King's College London also joins us down the line from Switzerland.

    http://www.theguardian.com/science/audio/2015/jan/12/risks-diy-synthetic-biology-safety

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  6. Tim O’Reilly & Jim Stogdill Explore Software - Hardware - Everywhere

    http://solidcon.com We've reached another tipping point in history. The collision of hardware and software—the confluence of the virtual and physical—changes everything from products, industrial practices, and business models to appliances, automobiles, and job opportunities. Today's Internet of Everything is a classic market disruption, with immense unimagined opportunities and more than a few thorny challenges.

    Join Tim O'Reilly, founder and CEO of O'Reilly Media, and Jim Stogdill, who leads O'Reilly's Solid, in a live-streamed conversation about the current state of the convergence of hardware and software, what this means beyond the Internet of Things, new promises and pitfalls, some opportunities we may not have thought of yet, and a vision for the future. Register free to get the livestream link and join this conversation.

    About Tim O'Reilly: Tim O'Reilly is the founder and CEO of O'Reilly Media. His original business plan was "interesting work for interesting people," and that's worked out pretty well. He publishes books, runs conferences, invests in early-stage startups, urges companies to create more value than they capture, and tries to change the world by spreading and amplifying the knowledge of innovators.

    Tim is also a partner at O'Reilly AlphaTech Ventures, a founder and board member of Safari Books Online and Maker Media, and on the boards of Co…

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  7. Ryan Cousins on field programmable gate arrays

    The O’Reilly Hardware Podcast: Making hardware programmable.With interest growing in field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs)—witness Amazon’s recent addition of AWS EC2 instances that include dedicated FPGAs—this episode of the O’Reilly Hardware Podcast looks at what FPGAs are and how their capabilities are different from microcontroller boards (such as Arduino and Raspberry Pi). Jeff Bleiel and I speak with Ryan Cousins, co-founder and CEO of KRTKL (pronounced “critical”), the makers of Snickerdoodle, a board that’s based on an ARM/FPGA hybrid chip.Discussion points:

    The reconfigurable nature of an FPGA board, and how this flexibility enables developers to change what a device’s hardware is capable of doing

    How the FPGA development can be more iterative because of the ability to upgrade hardware by pushing out a software update

    How the FPGA and ARM chips interact with each other, and the performance benefits which result

    The factors that led to the development of the Snickerdoodle board and the company’s goal of making FPGA technology more accessible to audiences such as educators and makers

    Links:

    The Zynq SoC, which integrates ARM and FPGA software and hardware programmability

    OpenCores, a community repository of open source IP cores

     

    https://www.oreilly.com/ideas/ryan-cousins-on-field-programmable-gate-arrays

    —Huffduffed by RCR

  8. Ryan Cousins on field programmable gate arrays

    The O’Reilly Hardware Podcast: Making hardware programmable.With interest growing in field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs)—witness Amazon’s recent addition of AWS EC2 instances that include dedicated FPGAs—this episode of the O’Reilly Hardware Podcast looks at what FPGAs are and how their capabilities are different from microcontroller boards (such as Arduino and Raspberry Pi). Jeff Bleiel and I speak with Ryan Cousins, co-founder and CEO of KRTKL (pronounced “critical”), the makers of Snickerdoodle, a board that’s based on an ARM/FPGA hybrid chip.Discussion points:

    The reconfigurable nature of an FPGA board, and how this flexibility enables developers to change what a device’s hardware is capable of doing

    How the FPGA development can be more iterative because of the ability to upgrade hardware by pushing out a software update

    How the FPGA and ARM chips interact with each other, and the performance benefits which result

    The factors that led to the development of the Snickerdoodle board and the company’s goal of making FPGA technology more accessible to audiences such as educators and makers

    Links:

    The Zynq SoC, which integrates ARM and FPGA software and hardware programmability

    OpenCores, a community repository of open source IP cores

     

    https://www.oreilly.com/ideas/ryan-cousins-on-field-programmable-gate-arrays

    —Huffduffed by albill