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Tagged with “science fiction” (326)

  1. Christopher Nolan Calls Stanley Kubrick the Greatest Filmmaker | IndieWire

    You may love "2001," but you probably don’t love it as much as he does.

    http://www.indiewire.com/2018/05/christopher-nolan-stanley-kubrick-2001-a-space-odyssey-1201968793/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. BBC Radio 4 - The Film Programme, 2001: A Space Odyssey Special

    Francine Stock explores the hidden wonders of 2001: A Space Odyssey in a special edition.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b04pvdhk

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. The Incomparable | Sometimes You Need a Wookiee (Episode 408)

    Fresh from the movie theaters, here’s our flash review of “Solo: A Star Wars Story.” In a world where there’s a new “Star Wars” movie every year, sometimes it’s a relief not to have the fate of the galaxy at stake. What are the rules of Sabacc? Are references the lowest form of fan service? Will casual fans be more enthusiastic than hard-core ones? Why watch droids fighting for entertainment when you have holograms? From train heists to floating space yachts to surprise cameos, we break it all down.

    https://www.theincomparable.com/theincomparable/408/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. “2001: A Space Odyssey”: What It Means, and How It Was Made | The New Yorker

    Fifty years ago, Stanley Kubrick and Arthur C. Clarke set out to make a new kind of sci-fi. How does their future look now that it’s the past?

    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2018/04/23/2001-a-space-odyssey-what-it-means-and-how-it-was-made

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Can science fiction predict our economic future?

    Companies take a deep dive into the stacks of a sci-fi library to find out how we might react to new tech.

    https://www.marketplace.org/2018/04/12/business/can-science-fiction-predict-future

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. BBC Radio 4 - Great Lives, Series 26, Philip K Dick

    Michael Sheen champions Philip K Dick who has had an influence on his production of Hamlet

    Actor Michael Sheen (Frost/Nixon; The Queen; Midnight in Paris) explores the life of Philip K. Dick with Matthew Parris, and explains why he had such a big influence on his recent production of Hamlet.

    Michael first discovered Philip K. Dick through the film Bladerunner, and moved onto his short stories which got him thinking about science-fiction in a new way. Whilst reading about philosophy, quantum physics, and comparative mythology, it struck him how Dick was intuitively weaving narratives around all the most interesting elements that these fields were throwing up.

    He talks about Philip K. Dick’s innate interest in multiples realities, and how they overlap with Sheen’s own family experiences of mental health issues. In fact the more he found out about him, the more he was drawn to this enigmatic writer.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b017wyyc

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Episode 95: Blade Runner 2049 with Denis Villeneuve and Rian Johnson

    Director Denis Villeneuve discusses his new film, Blade Runner 2049, with fellow Director Rian Johnson. Picking up thirty years after the events of Ridley Scott’s classic Blade Runner, the film follows K, an LAPD officer, who discovers a long-buried secret that could plunge what is left of society into chaos.

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/thedirectorscut/episode-96-blade-runner-2049-with-denis-villeneuve-and-rian-johnson
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Sun, 04 Feb 2018 10:35:54 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Ursula Le Guin & Margaret Atwood - Literary Arts

    Ursula Le Guin begins her lecture with Margaret Atwood by saying, “I emailed Margaret about six weeks or so ago and said, ‘What are we going to talk about?’ and she replied, ‘I expect we will talk about 1) What is fiction?; 2) What is science fiction?; 3) The ones who walk away from Omelas—where do they go?; 4) Is the human race doomed?; 5) Anything else that strikes our fancy.’” The two women proceed to examine these questions and talk through their answers. They delve into their writing processes and motives, creating many humorous analogies for the act of writing, whether they connect it to naked chickens, salted slugs, or dark boudoirs.

    Margaret Atwood is a poet, novelist, short story writer, essayist, and environmental activist. She has written over 40 books and is best known for her fiction, including The Blind Assassin, which won the Man-Booker Prize in 2000. Atwood has used her public profile to advocate for human rights, the environment, and the welfare of writers. She has been president of PEN International and helped found the Writer’s Trust of Canada. As a public intellectual, Atwood is known as a brilliant thinker on a huge range of subjects who has a wry and ironic sense of humor and who is willing to call out platitudes and other forms of lazy thinking.

    Ursula K. Le Guin sold her first story over 50 years ago and has been writing and publishing ever since. Tackling various modes, including realistic fiction, science fiction, high fantasy, children’s literature, screenplays, and essays, her work has challenged traditional understandings of gender roles, politics, race, and identity. She is best known for her fantasy series Earthsea and her science fiction novel The Left Hand of Darkness. She has influenced several generations of writers, including Junot Díaz, Kelly Link, David Mitchell, and Jonathan Lethem. Throughout her career, she has continuously met criticism with courage, causing one critic to note, “It’s been hard for reviewers to cope with Le Guin. She’s often seemed like a writer without a critical context. But that may just mean that the context is still to come.” Among her many honors, Le Guin has received a National Book Award and, most recently, The National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters.

    If we knew everything ahead of time, we wouldn’t write the book. It would be paint by numbers and there wouldn’t be any discoveries.” – Margaret Atwood

    “Rereading a book is much better than reading it. A good book reread is better than a good book read.” – Ursula Le Guin

    “All doors are doors to the future, if you go into them.” – Margaret Atwood

    https://literary-arts.org/archive/ursula-le-guin-margaret-atwood/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Living in a Sci-fi World: Author Kim Stanley Robinson

    Chapters:

    0:47 How do you choose date and time?

    5:14 We live in a science fiction world

    9:25 Who’s creating the future, the scientists and engineers, or the sci-fi writers?

    11:22 The philosophical battle between science and capitalism

    16:07 How does one go about creating the future on paper?

    25:10 Is science becoming too much like a religion?

    29:24 Fiction is the steady instrument, science is what evolves

    33:00 Audience Question: On which planet or astroid or community from your novels would you most want to live?

    35:55 KSR reads from 2312

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H0smGDcZv4k
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Thu, 18 Jan 2018 18:57:59 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Episode 6: Designing the Future

    How do you design the future? Today we talk with cyberpunk founder and design theorist Bruce Sterling and feminist/activist writer Jasmina Tešanović about speculative design, design fictions, open source hardware, the maker movement, and the soft robots of our domestic future. Plus we go behind the scenes of the creation of a design fiction by Bruce, Jasmina, Sheldon Brown, and the Clarke Center—a video installation called My Elegant Robot Freedom.

    http://imagination.ucsd.edu/_wp/podcast/episode-6-designing-the-future/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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