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Tagged with “science fiction” (290)

  1. The Incomparable | I Tried to Quit This Book Twice (Episode 359)

    Looking for a good science fiction or fantasy book to read? Have we got a list for you. Our intrepid panel read all the novels nominated for the Hugo and Nebula awards this year—eight in total—and has returned with the results. No spoilers, but we’ll share our feelings about all eight books. With any luck, you’ll come out with one, or four, or eight books to add to your reading list.

    https://www.theincomparable.com/theincomparable/359/

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  2. The Incomparable | Team Killer Robot (Episode 330)

    Get your cowboy hat and your favorite Radiohead playlist, because it’s time to venture into the park for our first-season review of HBO’s “Westworld.” Is Anthony Hopkins running Westworld the park or “Westworld” the show we’re watching? Why can’t the Man in Black take a hint? Who is good and who is evil? Are the hosts sympathetic characters or empty, scripted shells? (And can’t you ask that question that about any fictional character?) We provide some quick analysis and also ponder where the show might take us in season two.

    https://www.theincomparable.com/theincomparable/330/

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  3. Apocalypse, Now - On The Media - WNYC

    Science fiction has always been an outlet for our greatest anxieties. This week, we delve into how the genre is exploring the reality of climate change. Plus: new words to describe the indescribable.

    1. Jeff VanderMeer @jeffvandermeer, author of the Southern Reach Trilogy and Borne, on writing about the relationships between people and nature.

    2. Claire Vaye Watkins @clairevaye talks about Gold Fame Citrus, her work of speculative fiction in which an enormous sand dune threatens to engulf the southwest.

    3. Kim Stanley Robinson discusses his latest work, New York 2140. The seas have risen 50 feet and lower Manhattan is submerged. And yet, there’s hope.

    4. British writer Robert Macfarlane @RobGMacfarlane on new language for our changing world.

    Throughout the show: listeners offer their own new vocabulary for the Anthropocene era. Many thanks to everyone who left us voice memos!

    http://www.wnyc.org/story/on-the-media-2017-07-07/

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  4. To The Best Of Our Knowledge: Time Travel

    Time plays such a big part in our lives, it’s no wonder we’re fascinated by the idea of escaping it. And what better way to escape it that to travel back into the past or forward into the future? This hour, we explore our obsession with time travel. Why is such a recurring them in movies and TV shows? And what can time travel teach us about ourselves?

    http://www.ttbook.org/book/time-travel

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  5. James Gleick: Time Travel - The Long Now

    Time travel is time research

    Gleick began with H.G. Wells’s 1895 book The Time Machine, which created the idea of time travel.

    It soon became a hugely popular genre that shows no sign of abating more than a century later.

    “Science fiction is a way of working out ideas,” Gleick said.

    Wells thought of himself as a futurist, and like many at the end of the 19th century he was riveted by the idea of progress, so his fictional traveler headed toward the far future.

    Other authors soon explored travel to the past and countless paradoxes ranging from squashed butterflies that change later elections to advising one’s younger self.

    Gleick invited audience members to query themselves: If you could travel in time, would you go to the future or to the past?

    When exactly, and where exactly?

    And why.

    And what is your second choice?

    (Try it, reader.)

    “We’re still trying to figure out what time is,” Gleick said.

    Time travel stories apparently help us.

    The inventor of the time machine in Wells’s book explains archly that time is merely a fourth dimension.

    Ten years later in 1905 Albert Einstein made that statement real.

    In 1941 Jorge Luis Borges wrote the celebrated short story, “The Garden of Forking Paths.”

    In 1955 physicist Hugh Everett introduced the quantum-based idea of forking universes, which itself has become a staple of science fiction.

    “Time,” Richard Feynman once joked, “is what happens when nothing else happens.”

    Gleick suggests, “Things change, and time is how we keep track.”

    Virginia Woolf wrote, “What more terrifying revelation can there be than that it is the present moment?

    That we survive the shock at all is only possible because the past shelters us on one side, the future on another.”

    To answer the last question of the evening, about how his views about time changed during the course of writing Time Travel, Gleick said:

    I thought I would conclude that the main thing to understand is: Enjoy the present.

    Don’t waste your brain cells agonizing about lost opportunities or worrying about what the future will bring.

    As I was working on the book I suddenly realized that that’s terrible advice.

    A potted plant lives in the now.

    The idea of the ‘long now’ embraces the past and the future and asks us to think about the whole stretch of time.

    That’s what I think time travel is good for.

    That’s what makes us human—the ability to live in the past and live in the future at the same time.

    —Stewart Brand

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02017/jun/05/time-travel/

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  6. Science Fiction Book Review Podcast › SFBRP #287 – Kim Stanley Robinson – Aurora

    Luke Burrage reads a science fiction novel and reviews it when he’s done. Then he reads another.

    Luke and Juliane talk about Aurora by Kim Stanley Robinson.

    http://www.sfbrp.com/archives/1069

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  7. 215. Kim Stanley Robinson (a.k.a. The Ethnographer) — Shaman (An Interview) | The Skiffy and Fanty Show

    Prehistoric man, Shamans, and anthropological wonders, oh my!  Paul has his dreams fulfilled in this special interview with the legendary Kim Stanley Robinson.  We discuss his book, Shaman (now out in paperback), his Three Californias trilogy, the changing political landscape, the expository nature of genre, and much more! We hope you enjoy the episode!

    https://skiffyandfanty.com/2014/08/15/215-kim-stanley-robinson-a-k-a-the-ethnographer-shaman-an-interview/

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  8. The Literary Imagination: Jonathan Lethem and Kim Stanley Robinson on the influence of Philip K. Dick - UCTV - University of California Television

    University of California Television provides informational, educational, and enrichment television programming to the public and draws upon the vast intellectual, scientific, and creative talents of the University of California.

    http://www.uctv.tv/shows/The-Literary-Imagination-Jonathan-Lethem-and-Kim-Stanley-Robinson-on-the-influence-of-Philip-K-Dick-25439

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  9. The SciFri Book Club Introduces Dune - Science Friday

    Illustration by John SchoenherrAfter a hiatus, the SciFri Book Club is back! The concept is simple: Read a great science or sci-fi book, and discuss it with authors, scientists, and your fellow SciFri listeners on-air and online. This summer, we’re reading Frank Herbert’s ecological epic Dune.

    Join sci-fi author Kim Stanley Robinson and astrobiologist and theoretical physicist Sara Imari Walker as they help kick off the club with an introduction to Herbert’s “Duniverse.”

    http://www.sciencefriday.com/segments/the-scifri-book-club-introduces-dune/

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  10. Neal Stephenson at The Interval at Long Now | San Francisco

    "SEVENEVES at The Interval reading and signing": A special daytime talk by celebrated speculative fiction author
 Neal Stephenson on the occassion of his just released novel "SEVENEVES". After a reading, Long Now co-founder Stewart Brand joins Neal to discuss the research and writing of the new book, plus a little bit about what is coming next.

    https://theinterval.org/salon-talks/02015/may/21/seveneves-interval-reading-and-signing

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