aelfman / tags / ux

Tagged with “ux” (4)

  1. Tania Lang — Using Ajax to enhance UX

    Ajax is changing the way that users interact with websites — it has the potential to provide richer and more interactive online user experiences but also introduces its own set of usability and accessibility problems. This session will present views from leading usability experts from around the world from an experienced practitioner workshop conducted at the Usability Professionals Conference in USA.

    We will also discuss key usability issues we have unveiled through our own usability testing of a range of websites using Ajax over the last 2 years. The session will highlight some of the pitfalls and user frustrations with Ajax as well as how Ajax can be used to enhance the user experience. We will present usability and accessibility issues and common user behaviours with Ajax applications.

    Finally we will discuss interaction design guidelines for developing user friendly Ajax designs. This is not a technical session and will appeal to designers, developers and anyone working with interactive websites or web applications.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/tania-lang-using-ajax-to-enhance-ux/

    —Huffduffed by aelfman

  2. Being a UX Team of One

    What’s the best way to evolve design ideas quickly? Get together with other designers and brainstorm. The second best way? Adapt the methods of larger UX groups to a team of one. Learn how in this presentation, which shares lightweight techniques for quick and effective brainstorming on your own.

    Slideshare presentation: http://www.slideshare.net/ugleah/ux-team-of-one-sxsw-2009-1161299 Leah Buley, Adaptive Path

    —Huffduffed by aelfman

  3. Matt Balara — Flogging design: best practices in online shop design

    Considering how many busi nesses depend upon the web for their income, it’s shock­ing how poorly designed most shops are. Not only aes thet i cally, but also as far as ease of use, retail psy chol ogy and user expe ri ence are con cerned. How can we design bet­ter shops? If cus tomers enjoy shop ping more, won’t our clients earn more? Can forms be fun? What’s the psy chol ogy behind online pur chases? How can online and offline buy ing expe ri ences be har monised? Matt Balara will share some of his 15 years of expe ri ence design ing web sites, the vast major ity of which have sold some thing or other.

    —Huffduffed by aelfman

  4. Christian Crumlish: Designing Social Interfaces: 5 Principles, 5 Practices, 5 Anti-Patterns

    As we use social tools on the web, design patterns are emerging. Social design must be organic, not static, emotional, not data-driven. A social experience builds on relationships, not transactions.

    In 2008, Yahoo!’s Christian Crumlish introduced the idea of social design patterns to BayCHI. He returns in 2010 to share what he learned over two years. With his Yahoo! colleague Erin Malone, Christian created a wiki to gather social design patterns and published a snapshot of the wiki in book form.

    Among the many principles of social design, Christian presents five:

    • Pave the Cowpaths: Watch what people do, then support and adapt to that behavior.
    • Talk Like a Person: Use a conversational voice. Be self-deprecating when an error occurs. Ask questions.
    • Be Open: Embrace open standards. Support two-way exchange of data with other applications.
    • Learn from Games: Give your application fun elements, like collecting and customization.
    • Respect the Ethical Dimension: Understand the expectations people have in social situations and abide by them.

    Christian then describes five practices:

    • Give people a way to be identified and to characterize themselves.
    • Create social objects that give people context for interaction.
    • Give people something to do, and understand the continuum of participation, from lurkers to creators to leaders.
    • Enable a bridge to real life.
    • Let the community elevate people and the content they value.

    Finally, he discusses five anti-patterns, commonly-used design choices that appear to solve a problem but that can backfire and pollute of the commons. Examples:

    • The Cargo Cult: Copying successful designs without understanding why they are successful.
    • Breaking Email: Sending an email alert, but rejecting or silently discarding the reply.
    • The Password Anti-Pattern: Asking people for their password to another service encourages poor on-line hygiene.
    • The Ex-Boyfriend Bug: Connecting people who share a social circle but who have reasons to avoid each other.
    • The Potemkin Village: Building groups with no members. Instead, let people gather naturally.

    Christian stresses that social design is an ecosystem in which designers must balance many trade-offs. Not every design pattern applies to every application, but good designers can use patterns to strike a balance that works.

    http://chi.conversationsnetwork.org/shows/detail4459.html

    —Huffduffed by aelfman