Still Life with Emotional Contagion

Possibly related…

  1. Track Changes: Rational Geographic—Map Chat with Aaron Straup Cope

    The history and the future of geotagging: this week Paul Ford and Rich Ziade talk to Aaron Straup Cope, a programmer who works with maps and geographical datasets. The conversation covers his time as one of Flickr’s earliest employees, data visualization, gazetteers, the evils of Walmart, geocoding (and reverse geocoding), and one of the most controversial decisions in online mapping—Google’s decision to cut off the poles and make the world a square.

    http://trackchanges.libsyn.com/rational-geographicmap-chat-with-aaron-straup-cope

    —Huffduffed by cdevroe

  2. Adactio: Articles—Of Time And The Network

    A presentation about history, networks, and digital preservation, from the Webstock conference held in Wellington, New Zealand in February 2012.

    Our perception and measurement of time has changed as our civilisation has evolved. That change has been driven by networks, from trade routes to the internet. Now that we have the real-time web allowing instantaneous global communication, there’s a danger that we may neglect our legacy for the future. While the web has democratised publishing, allowing anyone to share ideas with a global audience, it doesn’t appear to be the best medium for preserving our cultural resources: websites and documents disappear down the digital memory hole every day. But we can change that. This presentation will offer an alternative history of technology and a fresh perspective on the future that is ours to save.

    http://adactio.com/articles/5312/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Tethering the Hovercraft

    A careen through grassroots innovation, speculative design, supply chains and sexual healthcare provision, lashing down over-caffeinated flailing into the grit of socio-technical systems.

    http://2014.dconstruct.org/conference/georginavoss/

    Georgina Voss is a writer and researcher working on the interplay of technology, politics and culture. She sometimes writes for The Guardian, and she’s currently in residence at the lovely Lighthouse Arts right here in Brighton working on a design fiction project that asks “what could digital fabrication and hyper-local manufacturing offer to the provision of sexual healthcare?”

    She also holds a doctorate from Sussex Uni, so that’s Doctor Georgina Voss to you.

    George has a knack for exposing the networks underlying the most normal-seeming activities. Usually “logistics” isn’t a word that conjures up much excitement, but George can make you look at shipping containers in a whole new light.

    Oh, and she also hosts a great podcast called Gin and Innovation which has featured dConstruct alumni Dan Williams and James Bridle.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  4. The Save Button Ruined Everything: Backing Up Our Digital Heritage

    Jason Scott is a man on a mission — save all the things.

    But what does “save” mean in the modern world, in the waterfall of personal and private data, and where do we even begin? Turning on the history-o-matic, Jason provides a backdrop to our attempts to “save”, what has been done, and what we can do. The talk will be fast-paced and loud, like a hard drive at the end of its life.

    http://2012.dconstruct.org/conference/scott/

    Jason Scott is a force of nature, tirelessly dedicated to preserving our digital history, from old-school game manuals to the latest social networking sites hell-bent on sucking our collective culture into “the cloud.”

    He is also a documentary film maker. He made BBS: The Documentary and Get Lamp, all about text adventure games.

    In the run-up to the destruction of Geocities, Jason set up Archive Team, a collective of volunteers who back up first and ask questions later. He now works for the Internet Archive, though he is at pains to point out that he does not speak for them.

    And yet, despite all his achievements, Jason will probably never be as well-known as his cat Sockington, who has over a million followers on Twitter.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  5. The Value Of Ruins

    Between The Alexandrian War of 48 BCE and the Muslim conquest of 642 CE, the Library of Alexandria, containing a million scrolls and tens of thousands of individual works was completely destroyed, its contents scattered and lost. An appreciable percentage of all human knowledge to that point in history was erased. Yet in his novella “The Congress”, Jorge Luis Borges wrote that “every few centuries, it’s necessary to burn the Library of Alexandria”.

    In his session James will ask if, as we build ourselves new structures of knowledge and certainty, as we design our future, should we be concerned with the value of our ruins?

    http://2010.dconstruct.org/speakers/james-bridle

    With a background in both computing and traditional publishing James Bridle attempts to bridge the gaps between technology and literature. He runs Bookkake, a small independent publisher and writes about books and the publishing industry at booktwo.org. In 2009 he helped launch Enhanced Editions, the first e-reading application with integrated audiobooks.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  6. Infinite Scroll

    Our distant ancestors often felt overloaded by information. (“Have you read Cicero’s latest speech?” “I don’t have time!”) Throughout history we’ve invented shortcuts like tables of contents, indexes, book reviews, and encyclopedias. What technological solutions might help us cope with the information overload we experience today? Guests include: Stewart Butterfield, CEO of Slack, and Nathan Jurgenson, Snapchat sociologist.

    https://slate.com/technology/2018/11/tools-to-manage-information-overload-tables-of-contents-indexes-encyclopedias-slack.html

    —Huffduffed by kevinpacheco

  7. Infinite Scroll

    Our distant ancestors often felt overloaded by information. (“Have you read Cicero’s latest speech?” “I don’t have time!”) Throughout history we’ve invented shortcuts like tables of contents, indexes, book reviews, and encyclopedias. What technological solutions might help us cope with the information overload we experience today? Guests include: Stewart Butterfield, CEO of Slack, and Nathan Jurgenson, Snapchat sociologist.

    https://slate.com/technology/2018/11/tools-to-manage-information-overload-tables-of-contents-indexes-encyclopedias-slack.html

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. A Cunning Plan

    Inventing the next twenty years, strategic foresight, fictional futurism and English rural magic: Warren Ellis attempts to convince you that they are all pretty much the same thing, and why it was very important that some people used to stalk around village hedgerows at night wearing iron goggles.

    http://2014.dconstruct.org/conference/warrenellis/

    Warren Ellis is a writer. He is not the violinist in the Bad Seeds.

    Some of the things he has written have pictures in them, like Transmetropolitan, Planetary, and The Authority. Some of the things he has written are constructed entirely from words, like Crooked Little Vein and the best-selling Gun Machine.

    Gun Machine is currently being developed for television. His book Red was adapted for the big screen in 2010. We shan’t hold it against him.

    You can find him on Twitter, on Tumblr, on This Is My Jam, and you used to be able to find him in Second Life, but most importantly, he has his own website because he’s down with the Indie Web.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  9. Michael Nelson on digital preservation

    Michael Nelson, Associate Professor at Old Dominion University, developed, along with colleagues at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, “Memento,” a technical framework aimed at better integrating the current and the past web. In the past, archiving history involved collecting tangible things such as letters and newspapers. Now, Nelson points out, the web has become a primary medium with no serious preservation system in place. He discusses how the web is stuck in the perpetual now, making it difficult to view past information. The goal behind Memento, according to Nelson, is to create an all-inclusive Internet archive system, which will allow users to engage in a form of Internet time travel, surpassing the current archive systems such as the Wayback Machine.

    http://surprisinglyfree.com/2011/09/06/michael-nelson/

    —Huffduffed by KurtL