adactio / Jeremy Keith

An Irish web developer living in Brighton, England working with Clearleft.

I built Huffduffer.

There are thirty-nine people in adactio’s collective.

Huffduffed (4028)

  1. Kim Stanley Robinson: Valuing the Earth and Future Generations: Imagining Post-Capitalism

    Climate change and population growth will combine in the twenty-first century to put an enormous load on humanity’s bio-infrastructural support system, the planet Earth. Kim Stanley Robinson argues that our current economic system undervalues both the environment and future human generations, and it will have to change if we hope to succeed in dealing with the enormous challenges facing us. Science is the most powerful conceptual system we have for dealing with the world, and we are certain to be using science to design and guide our response to the various crises now bearing down on us. A more scientific economics — what would that look like? And what else in our policy, habits, and values will have to change?

    Winner of Hugo, Nebula and Locus Awards, Kim Stanley Robinson is best known for his award-winning Mars trilogy. He has published fifteen novels and several short stories collections, often exploring ecological and sociological themes. Recently, the US National Science Foundation has sent Robinson to Antarctica as part of their Antarctic Artists and Writers Program. In April 2011, Robinson presented his observations on the cyclical nature of capitalism at the Rethinking Capitalism conference, University of California, Santa Cruz. In 1984, he published his doctoral dissertation, The N…

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Csvroehk7Ww
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Sun, 10 Mar 2019 00:11:13 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. How to Predict the Next Big Thing and Ride the Wave of Innovation - Boagworld Show

    This week on the Boagworld Show we are joined by Jeremy Keith to talk about his uncanny ability to predict the trends that really matter in the digital field.

    https://boagworld.com/season/23/episode/2308/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Offworld: How Would Space Politics Work?

    Once humans start colonizing other planets, how will politics work between Earth and those who live offworld? Ariel is joined by author Annalee Newitz and linguist Nick Farmer—who works on the show the Expanse—to discuss science fiction’s portrayal of realistic space politics!

    https://www.tested.com/science/space/867975-offworld-how-would-space-politics-work/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Decentralize It

    Some people believe that decentralization is the inevitable future of the web. They believe that internet users will start to demand more privacy and authenticity of information online, and that they’ll look to decentralized platforms to get those things. But would decentralization be as utopian as advocates say it could be?

    Host Manoush Zomorodi speaks to Eugen Rochko of Mastodon, an ad-free alternative to Twitter; Justin Hunter of Graphite docs, a decentralized alternative to GoogleDocs; Maria Bustillos who hopes to help eliminate fake news online through the Blockchain; David Irvine, the co-founder of MaidSafe who plans to make the centralized internet as we know it redundant; and Tom Simonite of WIRED, who comments on both the promise and also the pitfalls of decentralization.

    https://irlpodcast.org/season4/episode6/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. How to Take the Next Step in Your Development Career - Boagworld Show

    This week on the Boagworld Show we are joined by Harry Roberts to discuss how his career as a developer has evolved over the years.

    https://boagworld.com/season/23/episode/2306/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Utopian science fictions legitimising our current dystopia – 2019 Taylor Lecture, Oxford University – Yanis Varoufakis

    The Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages, Oxford University, kindly invited me to deliver the 2019 Taylor Lecture on 12th February 2019. I chose the topic of Realistic Utopias versus Dystopic Realities – my aim being to highlight the manner in which really-existing capitalism is marketed as a utopian science fiction that has nothing to do with… really-existing capitalism. Behind this elegant utopian mathematical the powers-that-be hide a dismal dystopia that is failing humanity in a variety of ways. Plato, King Lear, Coriolanus and the Borg Queen make cameo appearances…

    https://www.yanisvaroufakis.eu/2019/02/19/utopian-science-fictions-legitimising-for-our-current-dystopia-2019-taylor-lecture-oxford-university/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. 28. Cennydd Bowles - The Machine Ethics Podcast

    This month I’m joined by Cennydd Bowles who I’ve been meaning to get on the podcast for over a year. We talk about his book Future Ethics, collective action in the tech industry, ethical design sprints and crits, design fictions to bring ethical thinking to the general public (think Black mirror), the law of double affect, and the tech industry and climate change.

    https://www.machine-ethics.net/podcast/28-cennydd-bowles/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. When laptops go bad… ON STAGE  |  Web  |  Google Developers

    Also share target, shadow parts, and streams.

    https://developers.google.com/web/shows/http203/podcast/when-laptops-go-bad-on-stage

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. #23 – Psycho – Settling the Score

    Find out how much praise we shower on the AFI’s #4 – Bernard Herrmann’s score for 1960’s Psycho! How did arguably the most famous of all film score cues result from ignoring Hitchcock’s specific instructions? What did Herrmann see in this film beyond even what Hitchcock perhaps intended? And, how would you spell the Psycho noise? Plus, a special appearance by Jon’s wife Becky for some insight into violin techniques.

    http://www.settlingthescorepodcast.com/23-psycho/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Start The Week: The health of science

    Tom Sutcliffe with Sir Robert Lechler, Jo Dunkley, Bernie Bulkin and Elizabeth Pisani.

    There is nothing new for chemistry to discover, says Bernie Bulkin. In Solving Chemistry: A Scientist’s Journey, the former Head of Science at BP argues that an unprecedented event has happened: a branch of science has made all the major discoveries it is likely to make. He tells Tom Sutcliffe what this means for chemistry - and for science more broadly.

    Medicine is in the midst of ‘a biomedical revolution’ says Professor Sir Robert Lechler. His own field of kidney transplants has been transformed by our new understanding of the immune system. He has helped to curate Spare Parts, an exhibition at the Science Gallery that poses the question: how many transplants could we have before we were no longer ourselves?

    Elizabeth Pisani has watched interest in different diseases rise and fall. As an epidemiologist she charts the impact that press attention and public grants have on medical research, with some becoming fashionable while in others treatments lag behind. And she warns that scientists too often fail to take account of the human context when delivering medicines.

    Astrophysicist Jo Dunkley assesses our understanding of the universe in a concise new guide. But the universe is 85% dark matter - and we still know very little about this. She draws attention to the brilliant female scientists who contributed to breakthroughs in physics, but whose contributions have been forgotten along the way.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m00026ws

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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