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Tagged with “writing” (127)

  1. Nnedi Okorafor: Sci-fi stories that imagine a future Africa | TED Talk

    "My science fiction has different ancestors — African ones," says writer Nnedi Okorafor. In between excerpts from her "Binti" series and her novel "Lagoon," Okorafor discusses the inspiration and roots of her work — and how she opens strange doors through her Afrofuturist writing.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/nnedi_okorafor_sci_fi_stories_that_imagine_a_future_africa

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  2. Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: The danger of a single story | TED Talk

    Our lives, our cultures, are composed of many overlapping stories. Novelist Chimamanda Adichie tells the story of how she found her authentic cultural voice — and warns that if we hear only a single story about another person or country, we risk a critical misunderstanding.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/chimamanda_ngozi_adichie_the_danger_of_a_single_story

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  3. The Universal Page - 99% Invisible

    Reporter Andrew Leland has always loved to read. An early love of books in childhood eventually led to a job in publishing with McSweeney’s, where Andrew edited essays and interviews, laid out articles, and was trained to take as much care with the look and feel of the words as he did with the expression of the ideas in the text. But as much as Andrew loves print, he has a condition that will eventually change his relationship to it pretty radically. He’s going blind. And this fact has made him deeply curious about how blind people experience literature.

    https://99percentinvisible.org/episode/the-universal-page/

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  4. Nora McInerny: We don’t “move on” from grief. We move forward with it | TED Talk

    In a talk that’s by turns heartbreaking and hilarious, writer and podcaster Nora McInerny shares her hard-earned wisdom about life and death. Her candid approach to something that will, let’s face it, affect us all, is as liberating as it is gut-wrenching. Most powerfully, she encourages us to shift how we approach grief. "A grieving person is going to laugh again and smile again," she says. "They’re going to move forward. But that doesn’t mean that they’ve moved on."

    https://www.ted.com/talks/nora_mcinerny_we_don_t_move_on_from_grief_we_move_forward_with_it

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  5. Robert Forster - Book Shambles - Cosmic Shambles

    Founder of the iconic group The Go Betweens, Robert Forster, joins Robin and Josie this week to talk about his new book Grant and I. There’s also chat of the work of Alan Bennett, Jack Kerouac and TS Elliot. And then Josie discovers Robert is a fan of The Neapolitan Novels…

    https://cosmicshambles.com/bookshambles/robertforster

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  6. 70. Margaret Atwood (Author) - The Good, The Bad, and The Stupid

    Today’s guest is novelist, essayist, poet, and as of late, comic-book writer Margaret Atwood. She’s also got some really funny mini-comics about bad interviews, so Jason tries extra-hard to bring his a-game here. She’s the Booker prize winning author of The Blind Assassin, Oryx & Crake, The Handmaid’s Tale, and around 40 other beloved books. Her latest, Hag-Seed, is a total and delightfully wicked reimagining of Shakespeare’s The Tempest.In this episode Margaret talks with Jason about genomes in the cloud, Bob Dylan’s Nobel prize, the elusiveness of dead authors, and why technology’s a three-edged sword.

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  7. Marcus du Sautoy and James Bridle – books podcast

    On this week’s show, we’re exploring infinity and beyond with artist and writer James Bridle and mathematician Marcus du Sautoy.

    Through his visual art and writings on technology and culture, James Bridle has been at the forefront of our understanding of tech for the last decade – and from his perspective, the view of our future is both exciting and gloomy. He sat down with the Guardian’s technology reporter Alex Hern to talk about his book, New Dark Age.

    Limits are grist to the mill for Marcus du Sautoy, professor of public understanding of science at Oxford University. His mission is to explore – and if possible, explain – the unknown, so following hot on the heels of his bestselling book What We Cannot Know, is How to Count to Infinity. Meeting with Richard Lea at the Hay festival, Du Sautoy explained how a German mathematician first proved the existence of infinity in 1874, and what the concept means for our understanding of the universe.

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