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Tagged with “writing” (90)

  1. DPLAfest 2016: Authorship in the Digital Age

    A session from DPLAfest 2016 dedicated to the state of writing in the digital age. What does it mean to write a book, digital or print or both? What new technologies and processes are re-defining the role of the author? Panelists will touch upon these questions and more during this exciting discussion between three prominent contemporary authors.

    Speaker Biography: After stints in the editorial departments of Houghton Mifflin, the Knopf group, and Little Brown, Sarah Burnes became an agent in 2001. Joining The Gernert Company in 2005, she now represents adult fiction writers (Alice McDermott and Tony Earley among them), children’s fiction writers (New York Times bestsellers Margaret Stohl and Pseudonymous Bosch), and journalists and critics (New York Times Magazine contributor Jon Gertner and Freeman’s John Freeman).

    Speaker Biography: Virginia Heffernan writes about digital culture for The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Wired, Mother Jones, and The New Yorker. Her essays on digitization are regularly anthologized. Her new book, "Magic and Loss: The Internet as Art," will be published in June by Simon & Schuster. She works as an editorial strategist for startups and venture capital firms.

    Speaker Biography: Craig Mod is a writer and designer who splits his time between Tokyo and New York. Previously a product designer at Flipboard, he is also a TechFellow award recipient and a 2011/2012 MacDowell writing fellow. He is currently an advisor for Medium and Japan-based SmartNews. He has written for The Atlantic, California Sunday Magazine, Aeon, Virginia Quarterly Review, New Scientist, Contents Magazine, Codex Journal of Typography and other publications. He is the co-author of "Art Space Tokyo" and the Japanese essay collection, "Bokura no Jidai no Hon" ("The Books of our Generation").

    Speaker Biography: Robin Sloan grew up near Detroit and went to school at Michigan State, where he studied economics and co-founded a literary magazine called Oats. Between 2002 and 2012, he worked at Poynter, Current TV, and Twitter. He is the author of "Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore," which started as a short story and is now a full-length novel.

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QuRbJaRF9YQ
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

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  2. 219: With Katel LeDu and Louis Rosenfeld - ShopTalk

    This week we talk with Katel LeDu and Louis Rosenfeld — two book publishers in the tech and digital space. We chat about the importance of a publisher in the age of self publishing. What kinds of books are getting published and why should a publisher care about your book idea? What is the process for actually writing a book in 2016?

    http://shoptalkshow.com/episodes/219-katel-ledu-louis-rosenfeld/

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  3. BBC Radio 4 - Desert Island Discs, Claudia Roden

    This week Sue Lawley’s castaway is the award-winning cookery writer Claudia Roden whose Book of Middle Eastern Food revolutionised Western attitudes to the cuisines of the Middle East. Her Book of Jewish Food has been described as ‘the richest and most sensuous encyclopaedia of Jewish life ever set in print’. She chooses eight records to take with her to the mythical island.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00948k7

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  4. BBC Radio 4 - Desert Island Discs, Margaret Atwood

    Sue Lawley’s castaway this week is the writer Margaret Atwood. Born just after the outbreak of the Second World War, Margaret Atwood spent much of her childhood in the Canadian outback where her father’s work involved studying insects. She grew up mostly without television, cinema, mains electricity or even a proper road to civilisation. For company she had only her parents and her brother, with whom she wrote "serials, mainly about space travel".

    It wasn’t until her teens that the urge to write struck seriously, an event she describes as "a large, invisible thumb descended from the sky and pressed down on the top of my head. A poem formed." After University, a spell in England and a period teaching early morning classes to engineering students she had her first novel, The Edible Woman, published. Since then she has written nine more novels, four of which were Booker nominated with The Blind Assassin finally winning in 2000. Three of those novels have been made into films: Surfacing, The Handmaid’s Tale and The Blind Assassin. She has also published some dozen books of poetry, five collections of short stories, four books for children and assorted non-fiction titles. Her latest novel, Oryx and Crake, set in a genetically engineered, post-apocalyptic landscape is published on May 5th this year.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00937l3

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  5. CodeNewbie Ep. 82 What Is Code?

    Paul Ford didn’t expect his article on coding to go big. But almost a year later, the Bloomberg issue dedicated to “What is code?” is still completely sold out. We dig into the major topics covered in that long and highly entertaining piece, like conferences, open source, and languages, and how Paul and the editors created a technical article that still managed to be accessible to coder and non-coders alike.

    http://www.codenewbie.org/podcast/what-is-code

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  6. Understanding the Web with Jeremy Keith | The Web Ahead

    The web is being compared to "native" a lot these days, with some even declaring the web dead. But what are the strengths web? What does it do that native can’t touch? What is it we are making when we are creating something of the web? Jeremy Keith joins Jen Simmons to articulate how to understand and appreciate the web.

    http://thewebahead.net/110

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  7. Die, Mediocrity, Die!

    Do your own radio scripts ever bore you? Or frustrate, confuse, and deflate you? 

    Nancy Updike, who has written stories ranging in length from 50 seconds to 59 minutes, presents easy approaches to making your writing sharper, more memorable, and more engaged with the tape. Also, learn how to make drab tape beautiful through writing, and along the way, enjoy some schadenfreude: instructive stories of mistakes and failure are shared for the benefit of all.

    http://thirdcoastfestival.org/library/431-die-mediocrity-die

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  8. Selected Shorts - The Sun and the Moon

    Fantasy writer Italo Calvino offers a fable about love on and off the moon. “The Distance of the Moon” is read by Broadway star Liev Schreiber. And sci-fi master Ray Bradbury imagines life on a sunless Venus, where it has rained for seven years. Michael Cerveris reads “All Summer in a Day.”

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  9. Episode 10: Paul Ford and Josh Whip the Dip by Tomorrow

    The enigmatic and hilarious Paul Ford returns to Tomorrow to discuss his recent, critically acclaimed Businessweek story "What Is Code?" The two men actually manage to stay on topic for a little while, but the conversation soon devolves (evolves?) into a whirlwind discussion about commenters, Batman, and Nokia. In addition, listeners will have a front row seat to the birth of a unique, high-concept restaurant.

    https://soundcloud.com/tomorrowpodcast/episode-10-paul-ford-and-josh-whip-the-dip

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  10. Behind The Code Curtain

    The products made by Apple, Google, and Facebook in large part mediate our experience of the world, and yet most of us haven’t a clue about how they actually work. Brooke speaks with Paul Ford, the writer and programmer behind this week’s 72-page issue of Bloomberg Businessweek, "What is Code?," about the integral role code plays in our lives.

    http://www.onthemedia.org/story/behind-code-curtain/

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