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Tagged with “writing” (109)

  1. Anne Leckie: “Provenance” | Talks at Google

    Ann Leckie, winner of the Hugo, Nebula, Arthur C. Clarke and Locus Awards, joins us in Cambridge to discuss Provenance, an enthralling new novel of power, theft, privilege and birthright.

    A power-driven young woman has just one chance to secure the status she craves and regain priceless lost artifacts prized by her people. She must free their thief from a prison planet from which no one has ever returned.

    Ingray and her charge will return to her home world to find their planet in political turmoil, at the heart of an escalating interstellar conflict. Together, they must make a new plan to salvage Ingray’s future, her family, and her world, before they are lost to her for good.

    Get the book here: https://goo.gl/nJfmsd

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sapIgYyzAYs
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Thu, 09 Nov 2017 22:01:53 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  2. 003: Kevin Kelly, Photographing and Backpacking Asia in the 1970s

    Technologist, futurist, author, and photographer Kevin Kelly discusses traveling during the golden age of global exploration. We cover how photography has changed over the years, his decades investigating Asia in the 1970s and 80s, and how he self-produced (eventually getting it published by Taschen!) his Asia Grace book in the 90s.

    https://craigmod.com/onmargins/003/

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  3. Who Knows Where the Time Goes?

    Memories of the much-loved song Who Knows Where the Time Goes? written by Sandy Denny.

    Sandy Denny was just 19 years old when she wrote ‘Who Knows Where the Time Goes?’, her much-loved song about the passing of time. Soul Music tells the story behind the song and speaks to people for whom it has special meaning.

    The record producer Joe Boyd and founder member of Fairport Convention Simon Nicol remember Sandy and her music. We speak to musicians who have covered the song, including folk legend Judy Collins and the singer Rufus Wainwright, about what the song means to them. And we hear from people whose lives have been touched by the song, including the singer-songwriter Ren Harvieu, who suffered a back break in a freak accident and found strength in the song during her recovery. And neuroscientist and best-selling author David Eagleman explains why the years seem to fly past ever more quickly as we grow older. Also featuring contributions from Sandy Denny’s biographer Mick Houghton and Dr Richard Elliott, Senior Lecturer in Music at Newcastle University.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b08tcnmk

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  4. Wichita Lineman

    People reflect on the emotional impact of the country-pop crossover track.

    Wichita Lineman, the ultimate country/pop crossover track, is the subject of this week’s Soul Music.

    David Crary is a lineman from Oklahoma. He describes his job - storm-chasing to mend fallen power-lines; travelling on ‘dirt roads, gravel roads, paved roads… up in the farmlands of Illinois and Missouri… down south in the Swamplands… it ain’t nothing to swerve in the middle of the road in your bucket-truck to miss an alligator ‘.

    He recalls the first time he heard Wichita Lineman, travelling in the back of his family’s Station Wagon, listening to the radio… thinking that being a lineman ‘must be a cool job’ if someone’s written a song about it. Also a part-time musician, David has recorded his own version of the song which sums up his working life… on the road, working long hours, away from his wife and six kids.

    Wichita Lineman was written by Jimmy Webb for the Country star Glen Campbell. It tells the story of a lonely lineman in the American midwest, travelling vast distances to mend power and telephone lines.

    Released in 1968 it’s an enduring classic, crossing the boundary between pop and country. It’s been covered many times, but it’s Glen Campbell’s version which remains the best loved and most played.

    Johnny Cash also recorded an extraordinary and very raw version. Peter Lewry, a lifelong Cash fan, describes how this recording came about, towards the end of Cash’s career.

    Meggean Ward’s father was a lineman in Rhode Island… her memories of seeing him in green work trousers, a plaid shirt and black boots, wrapping his cracked hands in bandages every morning before setting off to climb telephone poles are interwoven forever with Wichita Lineman… as a child she always felt the song was written for her father, who else?

    Glen Campbell also gave an interview for this programme. Shortly after the interview was recorded, Campbell went public about his diagnosis of Alzheimer’s. His contribution to the programme is brief, and includes an acoustic performance of the song. It was a real privilege to record this, appropriately enough, down the line.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b013f96w

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  5. 002: Frank Chimero, The New Golden Age of Bookmaking

    Designer and author Frank Chimero discusses the process behind his book, "The Shape of Design." We also dig into the normalization of paying creative people to make things via crowdfunding or patronage platforms, and why there’s never been a better time to make books. Show Links: 

    frankchimero.com Shape of Design online

    Shape of Design Kickstarter Kevin Kelly’s 1,000 true fans

    Goodnight Stories for Rebel Girls, Kickstarter

    Robin Sloan Writes a Book, Kickstarter

    The Field Study Handbook Kickstarter Art Space Tokyo Kickstartup: Successful fundraising with Kickstarter and remaking Art Space Tokyo

    Full transcript and audio online at: https://craigmod.com/onmargins/002/  

    https://craigmod.com/onmargins/002/

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  6. Cuneiform

    The Egyptians thought literacy was divine; a benefaction which came from the baboon-faced god Thoth. In fact the earliest known script – “cuneiform” – came from Uruk, a Mesopotamian settlement on the banks of the Euphrates in what is now Iraq. What did it say? As Tim Harford describes, cuneiform wasn’t being used for poetry, or to send messages to far-off lands. It was used to create the world’s first accounts. And the world’s first written contracts, too.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p050skkr

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  7. Presentable #15: The Voice of Slack - Relay FM

    Anna Pickard, the Head of Voice and Tone at Slack, talks about how writing and language that is clear, concise, and human can be the bedrock of a great user experience.

    https://www.relay.fm/presentable/15

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  8. Why sci-fi and fantasy matter | Minnesota Public Radio News

    Sci-fi and fantasy stories "can short-circuit our assumptions about the world around us," says author Ann Leckie.

    http://www.mprnews.org/story/2016/12/12/truths-revealed-in-sci-fi-and-fantasy

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  9. BBC Radio 4 - Seriously…, Steve Earle’s Songwriting Bootcamp

    The legendary country singer-songwriter unveils the secrets of composing a great song.

    Legendary country singer-songwriter Steve Earle unveils the secrets of composing a great song. Every year he runs a four-day intensive training session in the Catskill Mountains in upstate New York. Journalist and aspiring songwriter Hugh Levinson joined around 100 other would-be balladeers to see what they can learn both from Steve and his fellow teacher, Shawn Colvin. Listen in to stories of dreaming, methadone, guns, jail, death and betrayal. All the good stuff.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04flsmq

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  10. Kim Stanley Robinson

    Award-winning science fiction author Kim Stanley Robinson does exactly that in many of his works. In this episode of Generation Anthropocene, producer Mike Osborne sits down with Robinson to talk about his creative process and environmental thinking, what makes for good science fiction, and the genre’s capacity to imagine future societies shaped by climate change.

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