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Tagged with “world war one” (7)

  1. audioBoom / The Bletchley Park Podcast - E54 - The Zimmermann Telegram

    January 2017

    The Zimmermann Telegram tells the story of how the US became embroiled in World War One. The threat from Germany came home to the United States 100 years ago this month, courtesy of an intercepted telegram sent by the German Foreign Secretary, Arthur Zimmermann. The tricky thing was, British intelligence didn’t want the US finding out they were reading what was coming over those cables. That made it rather difficult to warn the US, without giving the game away and thereby doing enormous diplomatic damage.

    We hear from the grandsons of two key figures in this story; Nigel de Grey played his part in decrypting this all-important message in Room 40, and went on to be crucial to codebreaking during World War Two. The other, Thomas Hohler, was our man in Mexico at the time. Last summer their grandsons met up at Bletchley Park, reflecting on the significance of the telegram and their ancestors’ involvement in bringing it to light.

    Also in this episode, you really never do know who you might meet at Bletchley Park. Eagle-eyed listeners may have spotted the TV historian, Dan Snow, waxing lyrical on social media recently, about the wonders of the Home of the Codebreakers. He came to visit and - like most people when they first see how brilliantly the story is now told - was moved and amazed. He stopped for a chat with Bletchley Park’s very own broadcast-friendly historian, Dr David Kenyon.

    Throughout this year, we’ll bring you more never-heard-before interviews with veterans of Bletchley Park and its outstations, celebrating the ongoing Oral History project, as well as freshly researched stories about what the Codebreakers achieved and the difference it made to the outcome of the war, in the Bletchley Park Podcast’s exclusive It Happened Here series.

    https://audioboom.com/posts/5502643-the-bletchley-park-podcast-e54-the-zimmermann-telegram

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Hardcore History 55 - Blueprint for Armageddon VI - Dan Carlin

    It’s been a war of gambling for the Germans, but by 1918 they find themselves with a window of opportunity. They have knocked Serbia, Romania and Russia out of the war in successive years. They (and their Austro-Hungarian allies) bloody the lip of the Italians in late 1917. In 1918 they are able to turn nearly their full might against the Allied-Entente forces on the Western Front.

    If they can smash their opponents in France before American numbers become overwhelming they can perhaps force a pro-German peace on Britain, France, the U.S. and the rest of the allies.

    The “Multi-Punch combination” thrown by the Germans starting on March 21st 1918 is known by a variety of names, perhaps most commonly “The 1918 Spring Offensive”. But there’s nothing “common” about it. It will include some of the most nasty battles in history and will give the Allies several “soil your underpants” moments right from the very start.

    http://www.dancarlin.com/hh-55/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Hardcore History 54 - Blueprint for Armageddon V

    “Blood and mud, blood and mud, they can think of nothing better!”

     – British Prime Minister David Lloyd George (1917)

     

    How do you make the ghastly, traumatizing, charnel house moonscape of a First World War Western Front battlefield more horrific? Add water.

    Third Ypres (also known as “The Battle of Passchendaele”) combined all the atrocious features of other Western Front battles, with swamp-like conditions that were so appalling that it’s hard to imagine that conducting modern military operations there was even possible.

    While rain and mud were a common feature of First World War battles, the conditions at Passchendaele were uniquely terrible. Men, horses and equipment sunk in the quicksand-like muck. The rain and standing water drowned the wounded. The day-to-day existence for the soldiers living and fighting in thigh-deep mud or water was appalling. And it went on month after month. At least half a million soldiers became casualties.

    http://www.dancarlin.com/home-hh-54/

    —Huffduffed by adactio