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Tagged with “working” (12)

  1. How does the internet work? Julia Evans on CodeNewbie

    You type in a url and you get a website. But how did you get that website? What are all the little steps that happen when you request a page and (hopefully) see that page in your browser? Julia Evans breaks down how the internet works and gives us an amazing introduction to computer networking.

    Julia is a software developer who lives in Montreal. She works on infrastructure at Stripe, gives talks and has published a collection of awesome free programming zines.

    https://www.codenewbie.org/podcast/how-does-the-internet-work

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Nikki Gatenby - on building one of the best places to work in Europe

    These interviews and conversations give a glimpse into some of the people we have been working with at always possible, some of the brilliant organisations we have been championing and some of the latest thinking in leadership, creativity and learning.

    In this podcast Cat Rose has a conversation with Nikki Gatenby about how dreams are the backbone to her business and how 21st century companies should be engaging staff on a level of commitment and passion so deep that it no longer feels like work

    Nikki Gatenby is the Managing Director of Propellernet, a digital marketing agency that has been consistently ranked one of the top 10 places to work in the UK and Europe for the last 5 years as well as UK and European Search Agency of the Year. Nikki’s unorthodox approach to employee engagement has led to her being an internationally-renowned speaker on the philosophy of ‘making life better’ - built on the principle that if you create a brilliant place to work, then you’ll create brilliant experiences for your customers.

    Nikki has worked in the marketing industry for 20 years, in London, Paris and now Brighton, resulting in many awards an accolades - most recently Digital Woman of the Year at the Business Women Excellence Awards.

    USEFUL LINKS:

    www.propellernet.co.uk www.coveragebook.com

    -…

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/alwayspossible/nikki-gatenby
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Wed, 17 Jan 2018 17:59:46 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Radio Atlantic: Ask Not What Your Robots Can Do for You

    Our increasingly smart machines aren’t just changing the workforce; they’re changing us. Already, algorithms are directing human activity in all sorts of ways, from choosing what news people see to highlighting new gigs for workers in the gig economy. What will human life look like as machine learning overtakes more aspects of our society?

    Alexis Madrigal, who covers technology for The Atlantic, shares what he’s learned from his reporting on the past, present, and future of automation with our Radio Atlantic co-hosts, Jeffrey Goldberg (editor in chief), Alex Wagner (contributing editor and CBS anchor), and Matt Thompson (executive editor).

    https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2017/08/radio-atlantic-ask-not-what-your-robots-can-do-for-you/535929/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Self Developer - Developer Sara Soueidan — Being Freelance PODCAST WITH Steve Folland

    How do you go from having no idea of a career… to becoming Net Awards Developer of the Year? In just a couple of years?!

    For Lebanese freelancer Sara it’s been a journey of self development as much as anything she’s done for the web. Hear her story of learning, sharing, writing, speaking, teaching, creating… and then learning some more.

    http://www.beingfreelance.com/podcast-season-3/net-awards-developer-of-the-year-sara-soueidan-freelance-story

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Stephen Colbert on his improv background and how he gets in character for The Colbert Report.

    n this episode of Working, David Plotz talks with Stephen Colbert on how he puts his show together and turns himself from Stephen Colbert into the character “Stephen Colbert”—starting from when he wakes up in the morning, what he watches for inspiration, how he knows the material is any good, all the way through to the actual filming of the show.

    http://www.slate.com/articles/podcasts/working/2014/10/stephen_colbert_on_his_improv_background_and_how_he_gets_in_character_for.html

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Revision 200: The Indie Web on Working Draft

    For our 200th anniversay Schepp, Anselm and Stefan invited Jeremy Keith. Enjoy our excessive talk about the Indie Web!

    [00:00:39] The Indie Web Building Blocks Jeremy explains what’s the meaning behind the whole indie web term and why it exists. He continues to explain the technical basics: Decentralizing sources, authenticate on websites using your very own website and a social network of choice, sharing links to your blog posts to the social networks and getting mentions from twitter etc on your website and store them there. You can do this with just one requirement: if you have your own domain. It even can work on static sites and there are open source services like Bridgy that help you with concatenating the external sources.

    [00:22:57] IndieWebCamps We talk about the people who are part of the indiewebcamp thing and how it’s been created. It was created to create solutions and not only discuss stuff. We also speak about how to teach people about indie technology, how to learn to integrate it and where you can do so. Finally we talk about content ownership and the problem with external services who own your content and do what they want with it (like deleting it even if you don’t want to, thanks archive.org for storing things anyways). And Jeremy shares his first website version. If you are considering going to the upcoming beyond tellerand in Düsseldorf (which you should), be aware that there’s an accompanying IndieWebCamp happening.

    [00:48:23] Useless Design Patterns We’re talking about false assumptions of security which often have heavy impact on usability. Like on login screens when there’s only a generic error message not saying if username or password is wrong. We speak about if passwords should be shown by default to avoid the ‘confirm password’ fields and typing errors and most of the time people are in private and if not, they should be able to switch to hidden type mode. We also talk about captchas which are non-sense. In fact we should always ask ourselves why are we doing this or wait a minute, is this really a good idea? And test with real users to figure out what works and what doesn’t. Because assumptions by us is often simply wrong..

    http://workingdraft.de/200/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Secret History of Social Networking: Friends in High Places

    Rory Cellan-Jones tells the story of the social networking scramble of the early 2000s and finds out how Facebook emerged to become world’s biggest social network. Facebook wasn’t the first site of its kind - other businesses had a lot in common with Mark Zuckerberg’s efforts - but its simplicity and the single-minded focus of its CEO gave it an advantage over the competition. With big growth has come big controversy, over privacy, security, and targeted advertising. Rory finds out that some people are becoming more wary about what they share online - could new networks spot a gap in the market and steal Facebook’s crown? Part 2 of 3.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Secret History of Social Networking: Hippies and Hackers

    It’s a phenomenon which seems to have come from nowhere, but in fact computer-based social networks have been around for decades. In this three-part series the BBC’s technology correspondent Rory Cellan Jones traces the hidden story of social networking, from the early days of computing and the 60s counterculture through to the businesses worth billions today. From their roots in utopian experiments in California, online social networks spread around the world. In the past few years companies such as Facebook and Twitter have captivated millions of users. But what will be the next big thing in social networking, and how is it changing our lives?

    Rory Cellan-Jones traces the roots of social networking from the counterculture of the 70s through early bulletin boards and the first networks on the World Wide Web. Forty years ago, hippies and hackers came together to produce the first attempts at online community. Rory follows the trend through to the arrival of the World Wide Web, which turned a mass audience on to the internet and social networking. Part 1 of 3.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/shsn

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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