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Tagged with “web directions” (24)

  1. Patrick Hamann - Embracing the network

    The network is intrinsically unreliable. More so, the network is out of your control as a developer. Therefore, we must design systems which embrace the unpredictability of the network and defend against it all costs. How can you prioritise the delivery of your core content? What best-practices can you use to optimise your assets? How are APIs such as ServiceWorker changing the way we think about the network? Patrick is a front-end engineer at the Financial Times in London where – amongst other things – he is helping to build the next generation of their web platform. Prior to the FT he spent the last 3 years developing theguardian.com. When not speaking or ranting about performance he enjoys spending his spare time discovering new food and craft beer.

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    Original video: https://vimeo.com/148443331
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

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  2. Natalie Downe & Simon Willison - Lanyrd: From side project to startup

    Natalie and Simon launched the first version of Lanyrd.com while on honeymoon in Casablanca. As the site took off, they realised their side project was destined to become something much bigger. This talk will tell the story of Lanyrd, from a two-week proof of concept to a full-fledged startup via three intensive months of Y Combinator in Silicon Valley. They’ll share the trials, tribulations and lessons they learned along the way. This is the talk they wish they’d heard before they got started!

    Natalie co-founded Lanyrd on her honeymoon with her husband Simon. Before co-founding a startup, she worked as a senior client-side engineer at Clearleft in Brighton, UK. Today, she juggles leading design, client-side engineering and UX on the project with building the company. If Natalie had any time for hobbies, she would enjoy pottery, yoga, writing and flying her kite. Follow Natalie on Twitter: @Natbat

    Simon is a co-founder of Lanyrd, and co-creator of the Django web framework. Prior to diving in to the world of entrepreneurship, Simon built crowdsourcing and database journalism projects for the Guardian newspaper in London. Simon is responsible for all of the server-side code on Lanyrd, unsurprisingly written with Django. He is also obsessed with Zeppelins, and hopes one day to build one. Follow Simon on Twitter: @simonw

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  3. John Allsopp – The Dao of Web Design Revisited | Web Directions

    In 2000, when the web was less than half the age it is now, when the concept of web standards was still not much more than an ember carefully nurtured by a small group of practitioners who might fairly have been called fanatics (and less charitably, but just as accurately, lunatics), John Allsopp wrote “A Dao of Web Design”.

    Little did he know, and even less can he believe, that more than a decade later, an eon in internet years, it is still widely quoted by some of the web’s most well known and respected practitioners, and considered by some to be a seminal text in web design.

    So, ten years later, what does John now think about his thesis, and his suggestions for developers? In a world of highly fragmented user experiences, across all manner of screen sizes and input modes, what now seems hopelessly naïve? What if anything, stands the test of time. And what, if anything, new has John learned as he has continued to develop with web technologies over the last 10 years.

    Come and listen as John revisits a Dao of Web Design.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/john-allsopp-the-dao-of-web-design-revisited/

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  4. Andrew Fisher — How the web is going physical

    In 2020 there will be nearly 10 times as many Internet connected devices as there are human beings on this planet. The majority of these will not have web browsers. When it comes to the “Internet of Things”, web designers and developers are uniquely placed to create, connect and produce innovative new ways for these devices to be used.

    We are used to mashing up disconnected data sets, playing with APIs and designing for constantly moving standards in order to create compelling digital user experiences. “Old school” engineers are struggling to keep pace due to long processes for product and service design but as web creators we understand the value of rapid prototyping, user feedback and quick iterations. As developers, we play daily with a bewildering array of technologies that span networks, servers and user interfaces. As designers, we understand the nature of beautiful but usable technology.

    These skills, and our innate understanding of how interconnectedness enhances and creates engaging user experiences, mean that web creators will be critical for the next generation of Internet enabled Things in our world. From a potplant that tweets when it needs water to crowd sourcing pollution data with sensors on people’s windows and visualising it on Google Maps these are the new boundaries of the web creator’s skills. Have you ever dreamt of sending your phone to the edge of space to take a picture of a country? Or how about a robot you can control via a web browser?

    By exploring examples of things in the wild right now and delving into practical guidance for for getting started, this session will demonstrate how easy it is for web designers and developers to build Internet connected and aware Things.

    About Andrew Fisher

    Andrew Fisher is deeply passionate about technology and is constantly tinkering with and breaking something — whether it’s a new application for mobile computing, building a robot, deploying a cloud or just playing around with web tech. Sometimes he does some real work too and has been involved in developing digital solutions for businesses since the dawn of the web in Australia and Europe for brands like Nintendo, peoplesound, Sony, Mitsubishi, Sportsgirl and the Melbourne Cup.

    Andrew is the CTO for JBA Digital, a data agency in Melbourne Australia, where he focuses on creating meaning out of large, changing data sets for clients. Andrew is also the founder of Rocket Melbourne, a startup technology lab exploring physical computing and the Web of Things.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/andrew-fisher-how-the-web-is-going-physical/

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  5. Web Directions @media 2011: Jeremy Keith — Panel: Hot Topics

    A popular @media tradition, hosted by Jeremy Keith, the final session for day one will feature a selection of speakers discussing questions posed by conference attendees. A lively conversation and some passionate debate will occur, so bring along your questions and enjoy the robust discussion.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/jeremy-keith-panel-hot-topics/

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  6. Michael Mahemoff — HTML5 offline for fun and performance

    With HTML5, we can now cache our applications and the data that goes with them. This means our favourite programming platform can now be used to build apps that work offline, survive intermittent downtimes, and gain in performance from cached content. In this session we’ll get hands-​​​​on with the application cache to make the app run when it’s not online. We’ll check out the techniques for client-​​​​side persistence: web storage and indexed database. Finally, we’ll look at the latest techniques for file access — reading and writing files on the user’s hard drive from a web app is being defined by web standards and implemented in today’s modern browsers.

    Michael Mahemoff is a Chrome Developer Advocate for Google, based in London, always looking at ways to make the web a more habitable place for users and developers alike. He’s been programming on the web since the mid ’90s, in a range of public-​​​​facing and enterprise (Java, what else?) contexts, and is the author of Ajax Design Patterns (O’Reilly, 2006) and a blogger for Ajaxian​.com. Server side, he’s mostly a Ruby, PHP, and NodeJS guy and sushi is his preferred coding fuel. Michael holds a PhD from the University of Melbourne, covering software design patterns for improving user experience.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/michael-mahemoff-html5-offline-for-fun-and-performance/

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  7. Chris Wilson — Keynote: The Convergence of All Things

    This keynote will focus on the unique potential offered to web developers — the ability to use the web platform to build compelling applications that reach across different devices, scenarios and environments. In discussing the approaches necessary to deliver great experiences across all these spaces, we will also uncover unique opportunities in a platform that reaches from mobile phones to the biggest display screen in your house.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/chris-wilson-the-convergence-of-all-things/

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  8. Jason Grigsby — Keynote: Native is Easy. Mobile Web is Freaking Hard!

    No one who advocates for the mobile web wants to admit it, but it is true. Native is easier.

    It’s easier to sell to stakeholders. Easier to monetize. And most importantly, easier to implement.

    Argue about programming languages, memory management and reach all you want. There is one undeniable disadvantage that the mobile web faces that native apps don’t–over a decade of legacy code, cruft and entrenched organizational politics.

    But the web is essential. Even companies whose businesses are centered on native apps need web pages to sell those apps. We can demonstrate time and again that a web-​​based approach is a smart investment.

    So how do we sell mobile web projects? How do we work with the systems we currently have to build compelling mobile web experiences?

    And most importantly, how should we be changing our web infrastructure, tools and workflow for the coming zombie apocalypse of devices.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/jason-grigsby-native-is-easy-mobile-web-is-freaking-hard/

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  9. Craig Mod — How digital affects books and publishing

    We need to decouple the idea of ‘book’ from the mental image we carry around of ‘book.’ The innovation and benefit that digital brings to books and publishing lies less in how digital affects final artifacts, and more in how digital affects the systems leading up to and extending beyond those artifacts.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/craig-mod-how-digital-affects-books-and-publishing/

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