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Tagged with “voice” (12)

  1. 36 Seconds That Changed Everything – How the iPhone Learned to Talk

    From the moment Steve Jobs announced it in 2007, anticipation for the first iPhone was off the charts. And when it shipped? Customers lined up around their local Apple stores; some arriving days before the phones could be bought.

    But the hype and hysteria left one group of cell phone users out – if you had a disability, the new hotness was just a cold, unresponsive rectangle of plastic and glass.

    This is the story of how that changed in June of 2009, and what it has meant to people who are blind, have a hearing disability, or experience motor delays.

    This is the story of iPhone accessibility.

    http://www.36seconds.org/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Troika 34: Voice | Hicks Journal

    For this episode I chose a subject that had too many possibilties, so I’ve ended up with a ‘Double Troika’ like I did with Tearjerkers!

    I wanted to look at music that just used the voice, and choose some examples that were just a small part of that huge spectrum. ‘Mouth Music’ has so many variations globally, that it would impossible to cover properly, so instead I’ve picked 6 of my favourites. Starting with the music you might expect (the polyphony of the Trio Mediaeval) and ending with the more modern sound of Björk’s ‘Who is it’ from her vocal-only album, Medúlla.

    1. ‘Salve Mater Misericordie’ by Trio Mediaeval (Traditional hymn, ‘Holy Mother have mercy’)

    2. ‘Sleep’ by Eric Whitacre

    3. ‘Boy 1904’ by Jonsi and Alex (the last known recording of a castrato singer, fact fans!)

    4. ‘Hide and Seek’ by Imogen Heap

    5. ‘Song for the Siren’ by This Mortal Coil (yes, this one is a bit cheaty as it has a guitar as well!)

    6. ‘Who is it (Carry my joy, the left, Carry my pain on the right)’ by Björk

    https://hicksdesign.co.uk/journal/troika-34-voice

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. How a new technology is changing the lives of people who cannot speak—podcast | News | The Guardian

    Millions are robbed of the power of speech by illness, injury or lifelong conditions. Can the creation of bespoke digital voices transform their ability to communicate?

    https://www.theguardian.com/news/audio/2018/jan/29/how-a-new-technology-is-changing-the-lives-of-people-who-cannot-speak-podcast

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Vox Ex Machina

    1939, an astonishing new machine debuted at the New York World’s Fair. It was called the “Voder,” short for “Voice Operating Demonstrator.” It looked sort of like a futuristic church organ.

    An operator — known as a “Voderette” — sat at the Voder’s curved wooden console with a giant speaker towering behind her. She faced an expectant audience, placed her hands on a keyboard in front of her, and then played something the world had never really heard before.

    A synthesized voice.

    http://99percentinvisible.org/episode/vox-ex-machina/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Vox Ex Machina

    1939, an astonishing new machine debuted at the New York World’s Fair. It was called the “Voder,” short for “Voice Operating Demonstrator.” It looked sort of like a futuristic church organ.

    An operator — known as a “Voderette” — sat at the Voder’s curved wooden console with a giant speaker towering behind her. She faced an expectant audience, placed her hands on a keyboard in front of her, and then played something the world had never really heard before.

    A synthesized voice.

    http://99percentinvisible.org/episode/vox-ex-machina/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Are the robots waking up?

    Are we nearing the singularity, the point where philosophers say the computer programs we create will be smarter than us?

    Artificial intelligence is all around us. In phones, in cars, in our homes. Voice recognition systems, predicative algorithms, GPS. Sometimes they may not work very well, but they are improving all the time, you might even say they are learning.

    Come on an entertaining journey through the ethics of artificial intelligence or AI, the science behind intelligent computer programs and robotics. Some software engineers think about the philosophy of the artificial intelligence they are creating, others really don’t care.

    You’ll also hear two very human AI stories; the strange tale of the robotic resurrection of science fiction author Philip K Dick, and the resulting android that made headlines around the world, an Australian woman and Karen Jacobsen who has a talent for making voice systems warm and human-like, bringing her International fame as the voice of Siri and giving the Aussie accent some much needed street cred.

    You know her well - she’s in your phone, in your car and in your home. Is the singularity nigh?

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/360/are-the-robots-waking-up3f/5352572

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. The Digital Human: Voice

    Aleks Krotoski charts how digital culture is moulding modern living. Each week join technology journalist Aleks Krotoski as she goes beyond the latest gadget or web innovation to understand what sort of world we’re creating with our ‘always on’ lives.

    Aleks Krotoski asks if our voices are being drown out by the cacophony of content online.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/dh

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Rupal Patel: Synthetic voices, as unique as fingerprints | Video on TED.com

    Many of those with severe speech disorders use a computerized device to communicate. Yet they choose between only a few voice options. That’s why Stephen Hawking has an American accent, and why many people end up with the same voice, often to incongruous effect. Speech scientist Rupal Patel wanted to do something about this, and in this wonderful talk she shares her work to engineer unique voices for the voiceless.

    http://www.ted.com/talks/rupal_patel_synthetic_voices_as_unique_as_fingerprints.html

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Many Internets, many lives - Future Tense - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    How is the vision we have of our digital lives matching the reality? In a digital age who are we connected to and who are we not connected to? Should we re-think how evenly distributed access to the Internet really is? Two leading Internet scholars talk about the ways in which people are engaging with the digital world — from Australia and Africa to the suburbs of Boston and Shanghai and all points in between.

    Guests:
    Ethan Zuckerman, Director of MIT’s Centre for Civic Media and co-founder of Global Voices.

    Dr Genevieve Bell, Intel Fellow, Intel Labs Director, Interaction and Experience Research

    Further Information:
    RiverBend Books- Meet The Author Information (http://www.riverbendbooks.com.au/product/648347-MeettheAuthorAntonyFunnell-rbe11sep)
    SABRENet (http://www.sabrenet.edu.au/)
    Ethan Zuckerman’s blog (http://www.ethanzuckerman.com/blog/)
    MIT Centre for Civic Media (http://civic.mit.edu/)
    2012 RN Big Ideas Program with Genevieve Bell (http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/bigideas/what-does-our-technology-future-look-like3f/4003568)

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/futuretense/many-internets2c-many-lives/4241874

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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