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Tagged with “type” (14)

  1. Mena Trott: Meet the founder of the blog revolution | TED Talk

    The founding mother of the blog revolution, Movable Type’s Mena Trott, talks about the early days of blogging, when she realized that giving regular people the power to share our lives online is the key to building a friendlier, more connected world.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/mena_trott_meet_the_founder_of_the_blog_revolution

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. How Aldus Manutius Saved Civilization with G. Scott Clemons

    On Monday October 26th, Scott Clemons was guest speaker at Type@Cooper in the Herb Lubalin Lecture series and delivered this talk at The Cooper Union. In the last decade of the 15th century, a middle-aged private tutor named Aldus Manutius made the stunning decision to leave the comfortable employ of a noble family and enter the cutthroat world of printing. The implications of that career change reverberate to this day throughout the worlds of textual criticism, book design, typography, book production, copyright law, collecting and classical philology. Whether by accident or design, Aldus’s decision put him in the right place at the right time to apply the relatively new technology of printing with movable type to the difficult task of printing Greek. As a result, virtually the entire surviving Greek canon found its way into print for the first time, and therefore into posterity. G. Scott Clemons has collected the Aldine Press since his days as an undergraduate in the Classics Department at Princeton University. He currently serves as the President of the Grolier Club, Treasurer of the Bibliographical Society of America, and is a past Chairman of the Friends of the Princeton University Library. Outside of his bibliophilic interests, Scott is the Chief Investment Strategist of Brown Brothers Harriman & Co., a privately-owned investment firm in New York City. Scott curated the exhibition Aldus Manutius: A Legacy More Lasting Than Bronze, on display at the Grolier Club this past spring, and is the co-author of a companion volume to the exhibition, is available from Oak Knoll Books.

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    Original video: https://vimeo.com/144912861
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Tue, 10 Jan 2017 15:31:07 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  3. An Obsessive Type: The Tale of the Doves Typeface

    Can a long lost design classic be rediscovered at the bottom of the Thames? The obsessive search for the lost Doves typeface of the influential craftsman TJ Cobden-Sanderson.

    In 1916 TJ Cobden-Sanderson threw his precious Doves typeface into the Thames after a bitter row with his business partner. Almost 100 years later designer Robert Green set out on a four year long search to restore it for the digital age.

    A peer of William Morris, TJ Cobden-Sanderson first became known among the proponents of Arts and Crafts and even coined the term. But it was later at the turn of the 20th century that he became a leader of the British Private Press movement seeking to revive the tradition of the book as an object of art and manual skill. In 1900 he established the Doves Press along with Emery Walker in London’s Hammersmith. But when they fell out Cobden-Sanderson sabotaged their greatest achievement. He threw every piece of the Doves type into the Thames from Hammersmith Bridge. The only record of the drowned type was the handful of valuable printed books.

    A century later and graphic designer Robert Green nervously paces along the Thames riverbank. This trip is the culmination of four years of his life and his art. He has persuaded the Port of London Authority divers to look for minuscule metal letters buried at the bottom of the river.

    Robert has spent years painstakingly reconstructing the Doves Type. Using Cobden-Sanderson’s diary entries, he believes he has located the place on the river where the type was thrown. This is the story of Robert’s riverbed search reappraising the impact and legacy of the craftsmanship of the Doves Press and its co-creator Cobden-Sanderson.

    Presenter and produced by Nicky Birch A Somethin’ Else Production for Radio 4.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Ampersand conference: Jonathan Hoefler on Putting the ‘Fonts’ into Webfonts

    More than twenty years ago, Jonathan Hoefler made it his mission to promote desktop publishing (and shush its critics) by providing designers with a new generation of fonts: attractive and useful designs which set a new standard in quality and dependability, and are today known as the H&FJ library. Today, as webfonts are buoyed by a wave of early-adopter enthusiasm, they’re marred by a similar unevenness in quality, and it’s not just a matter of browsers and rasterizers, or the eternal shortage of good fonts and preponderance of bad ones. There are compelling questions about what it means to be fitted to the technology, how foundries can offer designers an expressive medium (and readers a rich one), and what it means for typography to be visually, mechanically, and culturally appropriate to the web. Join Jonathan Hoefler on an exploration of this side of webfonts, and a discussion of where the needs of designers meet the needs of readers. You’ll get a glimpse of what H&FJ has in store, and see why they believe that webfonts promise so much more than just ‘fonts on the web.’

    http://ampersandconf.com/jonathan-hoefler.php

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. The Big Web Show #32: Mandy Brown

    Mandy Brown joins Jeffrey Zeldman and Dan Benjamin to discuss the value of support, the future of type on the web, font choice on reader platforms, what print publishers can learn from web publishers, why you’ve got to write, and why the future belongs to editors.

    http://5by5.tv/bigwebshow/32

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. The Big Web Show 1: Web Fonts

    Jeffrey Zeldman and Dan Benjamin grill Ethan Dunham of Fontspring and Font Squirrel and Jeffrey Veen of Typekit (and other sites, too numerous to name) about one of your favorite subjects, “real fonts on your website” in this, our inaugural episode.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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