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Tagged with “trad” (68)

  1. Ep 223 Fair Plé to the “Lovely Girls” of Trad & Folk Music

    Waking the Feminists shone a light on the representation of women in Irish theatre. Now, women in Irish traditional and folk music are trying to address the gender imbalance across their sector through the Fair Plé initiative. It began with a meeting at the Cobblestone pub in Dublin and two of the women who were there that night – harpist Una Monaghan and singer Pauline Scanlon –speak to Róisín Ingle on today’s podcast and perform the song My Dearest Dear. This Saturday Fair Plé events are taking place around the world as part of a day of action, ahead of a showcase event at the Cork Midsummer Festival on June 16.

    For more information go to www.fairple.com

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/irishtimes-women/womens-podcast-7th-june-2018
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Mon, 25 Jun 2018 13:48:43 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  2. UCDScholarcast - Scholarcast 61: Style and context -Traditional Irish Harping

    Abstract

    This Scholarcast is an extract from Helen Lawlor’s book, Irish Harping: 1900-2010 (Four Courts Press, 2012). This study provides a musical ethnography and a history of the Irish harp. It gives a socio-cultural and musical analysis of the music and song associated with all Irish harp styles, including traditional style, song to harp accompaniment, art-music style and the early Irish harp revival. At the beginning of the 20th century, the Irish harp had a limited presence in Ireland, but over the course of that century the harp experienced a significant revival with the subsequent emergence of numerous styles. Issues of transmission, gender studies and identity are also examined in this book. The Irish harp is now firmly located in the musical life of Ireland, in art music, traditional music and early music. Its present state is conditioned by its history in the 20th century. This book presents and analyses both of these perspectives in relation to the Irish harping tradition.

    Helen Lawlor

    Dr Helen Lawlor is a musician and academic, specialising in Irish harping. She lectures ethnomusicology, music education and Irish music at Dundalk Institute of Technology. Helen holds a PhD from UCD, an MA in Musicology (UCD) and a Bachelor in Music Education (TCD). She is contributor to and co-editor with Sandra Joyce of Harp Studies, Perspectives on the Irish Harp (Four Courts Press, 2016). In 2012 Helen published her research on the harp tradition in a monograph entitled Irish Harping 1900-2010 (Four Courts Press).  She has also contributed articles to the Encyclopaedia of Music in Ireland, The Companion to Irish Traditional Music, Ancestral Imprints and Sonus. She has given guest lectures at Harvard University, the New England Conservatory, the American Irish Historical Society, the Royal Scottish Conservatoire.

    http://www.ucd.ie/scholarcast/scholarcast61.html

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  3. UCDScholarcast - Scholarcast 26: Perspectives on Popular Music in Ireland from the 1960s to the mid-1970s

    Abstract

    In this Scholarcast Paul Brady reflects on his early childhood encounters with music and on the importance of popular music in the 1960s to the formation of his own musical consciousness.  He recounts his earliest experiences playing with various  R ‘n’ B bands during his time as a student at UCD. In 1967 Brady joined The Johnstons whose combination of traditional Irish music with newer trends in folk music brought international success. Having distinguished himself as one of the most talented singers and accompanists of his generation he was invited by piper Liam O’Flynn to join Planxty in 1974.  Although deeply committed to traditional music, Brady stresses the importance of individual musical vision and the constant need for renewal and innovation.

    Paul Brady

    Paul Brady is one of Ireland’s leading singer-songwriters.  During his early career he was a member of several innovative folk and traditional bands including The Johnstons and Planxty. In 1976 he collaborated with Andy Irvine to produce a landmark album in Irish traditional music (Andy Irvine and Paul Brady).  He began a solo career in the late 1970s and his first solo album, Welcome Here Kind Stranger, was awarded the Melody Maker Folk Album of the Year. In the early 1980s Brady turned towards pop and rock music, and distinguished himself as a talented songwriter with albums such as Hard Station, True For You (1983), Back to the Centre (1985), Primitive Dance (1987). Other acclaimed albums include, Trick or Treat (1991), Spirits Colliding (1995), Oh What a World (2000), The Liberty Tapes(2002), Say What You Feel (2005) and Hooba Dooba (2010).

    http://www.ucd.ie/scholarcast/scholarcast26.html

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  4. A Salute to Irish Music with Martin Hayes | Connecticut Public Radio

    The musician Christy Moore said Ireland could never have the equivalent of a folk revival because it never let its traditions lapse. And that’s very true.

    http://wnpr.org/post/salute-irish-music-martin-hayes

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  5. Celtic Bridge On Comhaltas Fleadh Uladh 2017

    Celtic Bridge on Comhaltas travels to Fleadh Uladh 2017 in Bangor County Down, bringing you a selection of brilliant young traditional musicians from around Ulster, representing their branch, county and going forward to represent their province, medal winners and Ulster Champions, Pádraig Conroy Meagan Teague Ellen O’Brien Ryan and Oisín Murphy Aodhán Collins Aoife Mullen Dearbhla Duffy and Ards Comhaltas, my thanks to Ards Comhaltas branch for welcoming Celtic Bridge on Comhaltas to Fleadh Uladh 2017.

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/dunuladhcelticbridge/celtic-bridge-on-comhaltas-fleadh-uladh-2017
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Sat, 21 Oct 2017 23:32:25 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  6. Irish fiddle master Brian Conway brings his Sligo-style music to Las Cruces | KRWG

    Brian Conway is one of the finest County Sligo-style Irish fiddlers in the United States and abroad. The winner of several All-Irish Fiddle contests in Ireland, the native New Yorker has been playing fiddle since was ten, continuing a musical tradition that Irish musicians brought to this country and which has continued to evolve here. He brought his fiddle to the KRWG studios to talk with Intermezzo host Leora Zeitlin about the music he plays and the musicians who taught and inspired him, including his father. And while here, he demonstrated a little bit of the unique Sligo "accent" that defines Sligo-style fiddle-playing.

    http://krwg.org/post/irish-fiddle-master-brian-conway-brings-his-sligo-style-music-las-cruces

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  7. Episode 07-The Piper | shannonheatonmusic.com

    It’s honeybee season. And if all is well, bee colonies are at or near peak population this month.

    Also buzzing down the mountainside: a poverty of pipers, to help me dissect uilleann pipe logistics, lure, and lore. For “The Piper” I talk to the Rowsome family, Tim Britton, Tom Rota, Patrick Hutchinson, and Isaac Alderson.

    Now, the Irish uilleann pipes CAN drip with sweet, rich melody. And they are also as temperamental as hornets, as Tom Rota describes:

    “You know, I don’t want to play anything else, but sometimes I just want to throw them on a fire and just be done with it. They’re hard to tune and maintain. Some days they sound great, and then two hours later they sound terrible… so pipers have this kind of built in sarcastic irony going on, this kind of love hate thing with the instrument, which I think is part of the tradition, really. And it’s really kind of fun.” –T. Rota

    Pipers can lead a double life — as Irish musicians who play tunes together and enjoy deep social connections. And also as players of this demanding, temperamental, complicated contraption that only fellow pipers can truly understand. Pipers seem to connect to pipers of the past, perhaps even more than other instruments do with their predecessors. Patrick Hutchinson explained this beautifully:

    “The tradition is a conversation between those who’ve gone before us and those who are here now. And they’re not gone, because the way they play is preserved in people’s fingers. And when you play and you quote other players, as pipers do, those other players are brought into the conversation.” — P. Hutchinson

    These days people play the uilleann pipes all over the world. Some do come from five generations of pipers, but many come to it from non-musical families. As Isaac Alderson notes,

    “It doesn’t matter where you’re from: who you are, where you came from. But what matters is the spirit and heart you bring to it… If you approach it with respect and a genuine desire to become proficient, I think it’s wide open.” –I. Alderson

    I hope you’ll tune in on this conversation about uilleann pipes. Whether you already know about Seamus Ennis—or you don’t know anything about Irish culture—these conversations speak about challenge, gratitude, and reverence.

    Tune: “Silver Spear,” from Kitty Lie OverArtists: Mick O’Brien & Caoimhín Ó Raghallaigh

    Tune: “Heartstrings Theme” from Production Music Made for Irish Music Stories

    Artist: Matt Heaton

    Tune: “Tom Billy’s Butcher’s March,” from Swimming Against the FallsArtist: Joey Abarta

    Tune: “Triumph Theme” from Production Music Made for Irish Music Stories

    Artist: Matt Heaton

    Tune: “Padraig O’Keefe’s 1 & 2/The Humours Of Ballydaly” from Notes from the HeartArtists: Louise and Michelle Mulcahy

    Tune: “The Praties are Dug and the Frost is All Over” from 40 Years of Piping

    Artist: Seamus Ennis

    Tune: “Pipe Solo – Slow Air” from Standing Barefoot at the AltarArtist: Tim Britton with Chulrua

    Tune: “McFarley’s/Mill Na Maídí” from Harvest StormArtist: Altan

    Tune: “Jackson’s Frieze Coat” from Irish Wind MusicArtist: Bill Ochs

    Tune: “Kesh Jig” from In ConcertArtist: Bothy Band

    Tune: “The Old Coolun” from Take Me TenderArtist: Jimmy O’Brien Moran

    Tune: “Garret Barry’s/The Bucks of Oranmore” from In ConcertArtist: Paddy Keenan with the Bothy Band

    http://shannonheatonmusic.com/episode-07-the-piper/

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  8. Episode 06-The Backer | shannonheatonmusic.com

    For this sixth episode of Irish Music Stories (a shorter summer special!), I talked to some of trad music’s most inspired accompanists. It was great to hear about the inner game of backing from Matt Heaton, Neil Pearlman, Keith Murphy, and John Doyle.

    Now, singers and accordion players can also certainly ride a rhythmic wave in a session, or sculpt a song with color, texture, and deep care for the storyline. But there’s a particular experience that chordal players have with Irish music. I wanted to understand that feeling a bit more.

    John Doyle talks about the meditative quality of backing:

    “When you play in a good session, when it’s super rhythmic, you get into this flow state, especially when you’re rhythmic. It’s a very Zen-like, momentary space.. I think it’s a place where very few people get to in life. And then it’s broken when the tune ends… and of course, there’s an enjoyment, the love of music.”

    Pianist Neil Pearlman (who also hosts a great podcast called TradCafe) shared his thoughts on how a broader perspective shapes players and playing: “Traditional music is cultural music… knowing other people who play, dance, or speak with an Irish accent all go into some subtle sense of feel in the music.”

    And guitarist Matt Heaton says, “There are such cool things you can do with harmony. You can add tension, you can build suspense, you can make something sound bright and happy.. you can shine a light on certain aspects of the melody, sort of illuminate it.”

    I hope you’ll join me as I talk with Matt, Neil, Keith and John about how they think about backing traditional music.

    Whether you already play guitar, sing ballads, or dance steps.. or if you don’t know anything about Irish culture… these conversations concern deep listening, community, and flow state.

    http://shannonheatonmusic.com/episode-06-the-backer/

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  9. Episode 05-Handed Down | shannonheatonmusic.com

    It’s warming up in many corners of the world, and many players are heading to Summer Music Camps!

    But of course, music camps are just ONE way that Irish traditional music is handed down. And for this episode, I traveled to Pearl River, NY, Galway City, and to neighborhoods around Boston, to talk with musicians about how they learned their music, and how this has led them to pass it on.

    Séan Clohessy

    There’s big picture inspiration here from Sean Clohessy:“We have rhythm all around us—whether it’s breathing, a heart beat, blinking, walking, the seasons.. there’s rhythm in everything. Irish music is an easy way to perceive a lot of these things, and see things we can’t see with our eyes.”

    And there are intimate Irish music house sessions and concerts that have inspired Josie Coyne:“Falling asleep listening to amazing music, ever since I was really young.To meet all these musicians.. It’s pretty great.”

    And wisdom from Séamus Connolly, whose Collection of Irish Music is available online to all!“If traditional music is locked up, it doesn’t advance or move on. It’s very much a living tradition, and it should be that way.”

    Flanagan, Mulvahill, Furlong

    I hope you’ll join me as I talk with Rose Flanagan, Margie Mulvahill, Patty Furlong, Séan Clohessy, Josie and her dad John Coyne, Louis DePaor, Seamus Connolly, and Elizabeth Sweeney about their activities around traditional music, and how they feel about passing it on.

    Whether you already play tunes, sing ballads, dance sean nós steps.. or you don’t know anything about Irish culture… these conversations speak about friendships, community, and generosity.

    Seamus Connolly

    Read on for full music and poetry credits below. And take a peek at one of this month’s guests, Josie Coyne. This was back in 2013 (she’s 4 years older now..), when she joined fiddler Mick Conneely for a set.

    And here is Séamus Connolly at the NEA National Heritage Fellowship Concert from June 2014:

    Next month’s episode will air Tuesday July 11th. It’ll be a summer short about backers (accompanists). And on Thursday July 13th, I’ll be guest host of the Celtic Music Podcast. Hope you’ll check it out!

    Music Heard on IMS Episode 05

    all music traditional, unless otherwise indicated

    Tune: “Tap Room, Mountain Road, Galway Rambler” (reels), from Rehearsal recording from circa 2009

    Artist: Dan Gurney (accordion), Shannon Heaton (flute), Matt Heaton (guitar)

    Tune: “Travel Theme,” from Production music made for Irish Music StoriesArtist: Matt Heaton (guitar)

    Composer: Matt & Shannon Heaton

    Tune: “After Hours Theme,” from Production music made for Irish Music StoriesArtist: Matt Heaton (guitar)

    Composer: Matt & Shannon Heaton

    Tune: “Broken Clock,” from A Sweeter PlaceArtist: Girsa, feat. Maeve Flanagan (fiddle),

    Composer: Maeve Flanagan

    Tune: “Grupai Ceol Theme,” from Production music made for Irish Music StoriesArtist: Matt Heaton (guitar)

    Composer: Matt & Shannon Heaton

    Tune: “Heartstrings Theme,” from Production music made for Irish Music StoriesArtist: Matt Heaton (guitar)

    Composer: Matt & Shannon Heaton

    Tune: “Tom Ashe’s March,” from Rehearsal recording from circa 2009

    Artist: Dan Gurney (accordion), Shannon Heaton (flute), Matt Heaton (guitar)

    Tune: “Seán Sa Cheo,” from one of the 78 rpm recordings made for Regal Zonophone

    Artist: Neilidh Boyle (fiddle)

    Tune: “Triumph Theme,” from Production music made for Irish Music StoriesArtist: Matt Heaton (guitar)

    Composer: Matt & Shannon Heaton

    Tune: “Katie’s Fancy” (jig), live in Rose’s Kitchen, 2016

    Artist: Rose Flanagan (fiddle), Patty Furlong (accordion), Margie Mulvahill (flute)

    ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: Thank you for listening. And thanks to Rose Flanagan, Patty Furlong, Margie Mulvahill, Séan Clohessy, Josie and her dad John Coyne, Louis DePaor, Seamus Connolly, and Elizabeth Sweeney for the beautiful conversations. Thanks, as always, to Matt Heaton for the beautiful guitar underscore, and for invaluable support to make these episodes.

    http://shannonheatonmusic.com/episode-05-handed-down/

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  10. Episode 03-Every Tuesday at Nine | shannonheatonmusic.com

    It’s Springtime in Boston. And this month’s episode is a fresh invitation to connect with people, and emerge from Winter!

    John Williams and Amy Shoemaker

    I chat with Tina Lech in Boston, John Williams in Chicago, Eoin O’Neill in Clare, and Brian Conway in White Plains, NY about the sessions they lead. I learn how each player runs these distinct weekly music gatherings–and what Irish music means to them, and the listeners who come each week.

    And trust me: whether you already play the accordion, or you’ve never been to an Irish session in your life, the story here goes way beyond a few tunes in a pub.

    I hope you’ll join me as I try to decode what sessions are all about. My conversations with the session leaders–and with Boston producer Brian O’Donovan, fiddle teacher Laurel Martin, and flute players Melissa Foster and Scott Boag opened my mind and my heart. There’s plenty of music heres, too.

    http://shannonheatonmusic.com/episode-03-every-tuesday-at-nine/

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