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Tagged with “time” (92)

  1. 50 Things That Made the Modern Economy: Clock

    The clock was invented in 1656 and has become an essential part of the modern economy.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04skkw4

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  2. Marcia Bjornerud: Timefulness - The Long Now

    research focuses on the physics of earthquakes and mountain-building. She combines field-based studies of bedrock geology with quantitative models of rock mechanics.

    She is the author of Timefulness: How Thinking Like a Geologist Can Help Save the World, Reading the Rocks: The Autobiography of the Earth and is a contributing writer to the New Yorker’s Annals of Technology blog.

    Marcia Bjornerud’s Homepage
    More about Marcia Bjornerud
    

    We need a poly-temporal worldview to embrace the overlapping rates of change that our world runs on, especially the huge, powerful changes that are mostly invisible to us.

    Geologist Marcia Bjornerud teaches that kind of time literacy. With it, we become at home in the deep past and engaged with the deep future. We learn to “think like a planet.”

    As for climate change… “Dazzled by our own creations,” Bjornerud writes, “we have forgotten that we are wholly embedded in a much older, more powerful world whose constancy we take for granted…. Averse to even the smallest changes, we have now set the stage for environmental deviations that will be larger and less predictable than any we have faced before.”

    A professor of geology and environmental studies at Lawrence University in Wisconsin, Marcia Bjornerud is author of Timefulness: How Thinking Like a Geologist Can Help Save the World (2018) and Reading the Rocks: The Autobiography of the Earth (2005).

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02019/jul/22/timefulness/

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  3. Robin Ince: Science versus wonder? | TED Talk

    Does science ruin the magic of life? In this grumpy but charming monologue, Robin Ince makes the argument against. The more we learn about the astonishing behavior of the universe — the more we stand in awe.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/robin_ince_science_versus_wonder

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  4. Owltastic’s Meagan Fisher on adapting to the modern landscape of web design | Overtime Design Podcast by Dribbble

    Owltastic’s Meagan Fisher joins us on this episode of Overtime to share her insights on all things web design and how the field has evolved over years. Meagan shares her thoughts on what it means to be a web designer now vs. a decade ago and also tells us about how her own process has changed over the years. She’ll also share how the backbone of her career involved learning how to code and why she encourages today’s newer generation of designers to learn the skill.

    Meagan also shares some unconventional ways you can conduct user research when you don’t have the budget for it. You won’t want to miss it!

    https://dribbble.com/overtime/2019/04/10/owltastic-s-meagan-fisher-on-adapting-to-the-modern-landscape-of-web-design

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  5. Bruce Sterling at The Interval at Long Now | San Francisco

    Bruce Sterling at The Interval: The future is a kind of history that hasn’t happened yet. The past is a kind of future that has already happened.

    The present moment vanishes before it can be described. Language, a human invention, lacks the power to fully adhere to reality.

    We live in a very short now and here, since the flow of events in spacetime is mostly closed to human comprehension. But we have to say something about the future, since we have to live there. So what can we say? Being “futuristic” is a problem in metaphysics; it’s about getting language to adhere to an unknowable reality. But the futuristic quickly becomes old-fashioned, so how can the news stay news?

    Bruce Sterling is a futurist, journalist, science-fiction author, and culture critic. He is the author of more than 20 books including ground-breaking science ficiton and non-fiction about hackers, design and the future. He was the editor in 01986 of Mirrorshades: The Cyberpunk Anthology (1986) which brought the cyberpunk science fiction sub-genre to a much wider audience. He previous spoke for Long Now about "The Singularity: Your Future as a Black Hole" in 02004. His Beyond the Beyond blog on Wired.com is now in its 15th year. His most recent book is Pirate Utopia.

    https://theinterval.org/salon-talks/02018/oct/16/how-be-futuristic-bruce-sterling

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  6. Abby Smith Rumsey at The Interval at Long Now | San Francisco

    Abby Smith Rumsey at The Interval: Memory is not about the past, it is about the future. Historian and media expert Abby Smith Rumsey explores how digital memory, which cannot be preserved, will shape the future of knowledge and affect our survival. From March 02016.

    Abby Smith Rumsey is a historian who writes about how ideas and information technologies shape perceptions of history, of time, and of personal and cultural identity. She served as director of the Scholarly Communication Institute at the University of Virginia, and worked for more than a decade at the Library of Congress. Her book When We Are No More, How Digital Memory Is Shaping Our Future (02016) looks at how human memory from pre-history to the present has shed light on the grand challenge facing our world—the abundance of information and scarcity of human attention.

    https://theinterval.org/salon-talks/02016/mar/29/how-digital-memory-shaping-our-future

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  7. In Our Time: Automata

    Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the history of real and imagined machines that appear to be living, and the questions they raise about life and creation. Even in myth they are made by humans, not born. The classical Greeks built some and designed others, but the knowledge of how to make automata and the principles behind them was lost in the Latin Christian West, remaining in the Greek-speaking and Arabic-speaking world. Western travellers to those regions struggled to explain what they saw, attributing magical powers. The advance of clockwork raised further questions about what was distinctly human, prompting Hobbes to argue that humans were sophisticated machines, an argument explored in the Enlightenment and beyond.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0bk1c4d

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  8. The mystery of time - Big Ideas - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    More or less everything you know about time is wrong. This is no single time, but every one of you lives within your own time. Time passes at a different speed for each one of you. There is even no ‘now’ that you share with the person next to you. And the past only exists in your mind created by your memories.

    The Order of Time presented at the Royal Institution of Great Britain. 30 April 2018

    https://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/bigideas/the-mystery-of-time/9790674

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  9. Rosalind Franklin

    Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the pioneering scientist Rosalind Franklin (1920 - 1958). During her distinguished career, Franklin carried out ground-breaking research into coal and viruses but she is perhaps best remembered for her investigations in the field of DNA. In 1952 her research generated a famous image that became known as Photograph 51. When the Cambridge scientists Francis Crick and James Watson saw this image, it enabled them the following year to work out that DNA has a double-helix structure, one of the most important discoveries of modern science. Watson, Crick and Franklin’s colleague Maurice Wilkins received a Nobel Prize in 1962 for this achievement but Franklin did not and today many people believe that Franklin has not received enough recognition for her work.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b09rzm9y

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  10. Ep 223 Fair Plé to the “Lovely Girls” of Trad & Folk Music

    Waking the Feminists shone a light on the representation of women in Irish theatre. Now, women in Irish traditional and folk music are trying to address the gender imbalance across their sector through the Fair Plé initiative. It began with a meeting at the Cobblestone pub in Dublin and two of the women who were there that night – harpist Una Monaghan and singer Pauline Scanlon –speak to Róisín Ingle on today’s podcast and perform the song My Dearest Dear. This Saturday Fair Plé events are taking place around the world as part of a day of action, ahead of a showcase event at the Cork Midsummer Festival on June 16.

    For more information go to www.fairple.com

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/irishtimes-women/womens-podcast-7th-june-2018
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Mon, 25 Jun 2018 13:48:43 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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