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Tagged with “technology” (463)

  1. Tim Harford on Fifty Inventions That Shaped the Modern Economy - Econlib

    Financial Times columnist and author Tim Harford talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about Harford’s latest book, Fifty Inventions That Shaped the Modern Economy. Highlights include how elevators are an important form of mass transit, why washing machines didn’t save quite as much time as you’d think, and the glorious illuminating aspects of light throughout history.

    http://www.econtalk.org/tim-harford-on-fifty-inventions-that-shaped-the-modern-economy/

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  2. Infinite Scroll

    Our distant ancestors often felt overloaded by information. (“Have you read Cicero’s latest speech?” “I don’t have time!”) Throughout history we’ve invented shortcuts like tables of contents, indexes, book reviews, and encyclopedias. What technological solutions might help us cope with the information overload we experience today? Guests include: Stewart Butterfield, CEO of Slack, and Nathan Jurgenson, Snapchat sociologist.

    https://slate.com/technology/2018/11/tools-to-manage-information-overload-tables-of-contents-indexes-encyclopedias-slack.html

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  3. A Little Less Conversation

    Some people thought the laying of the trans-Atlantic cable might bring world peace, because connecting humans could only lead to better understanding and empathy. That wasn’t the outcome—and recent utopian ideas about communication (Facebook might bring us together and make us all friends!) have also met with a darker reality (Facebook might polarize us and spread false information!). Should we be scared of technology that promises to connect the world? Guests include: Robin Dunbar, inventor of Dunbar’s Number; Nancy Baym, Microsoft researcher.

    https://slate.com/technology/2018/10/people-thought-the-trans-atlantic-cable-or-facebook-might-bring-world-peace.html

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  4. #130 The Snapchat Thief

    This week, a new Super Tech Support: after Lizzie’s Snapchat gets hacked, things start getting really creepy. Alex investigates.

    https://www.gimletmedia.com/reply-all/130-lizard

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  5. Juan Benet: Long Term Info-structure - The Long Now

    "We live in a spectacular time,” says Juan Benet. "We’re a century into our computing phase transition. The latest stages have created astonishing powers for individuals, groups, and our species as a whole. We are also faced with accumulating dangers — the capabilities to end the whole humanity experiment are growing and are ever more accessible. In light of the promethean fire that is computing, we must prevent bad outcomes and lock in good ones to build robust foundations for our knowledge, and a safe future. There is much we can do in the short-term to secure the long-term."

    "I come from the front lines of computing platform design to share a number of new super-powers at our disposal, some old challenges that are now soluble, and some new open problems. In this next decade, we’ll need to leverage peer-to-peer networks, crypto-economics, blockchains, Open Source, Open Services, decentralization, incentive-structure engineering, and so much more to ensure short-term safety and the long-term flourishing of humanity.”

    Juan Benet is the inventor of the InterPlanetary File System (IPFS)—-a new protocol which uses content-addressing to make the web faster, safer, and more open—and the creator of Filecoin, a cryptocurrency-incentivized storage market.

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02018/aug/06/long-term-info-structure/

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  6. Human Insecurity

    The French telegraph system was hacked in 1834. What does the incident teach us about modern-day network security?

    The French telegraph system was hacked in 1834 by a pair of thieves who stole financial market information—effectively conducting the world’s first cyberattack. What does the incident teach us about network vulnerabilities, human weakness, and modern-day security? Guests include: Bruce Schneier, security expert.

    http://www.slate.com/articles/podcasts/secret_history_of_the_future/2018/10/what_an_1834_hack_of_the_french_telegraph_system_can_teach_us_about_modern.html

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  7. The Box That AI Lives In

    How could an 18th-century robot win at chess? By using a trick that big tech firms still pull on us today.

    In the new podcast The Secret History of the Future, from Slate and the Economist: Examine the history of tech to uncover stories that help us illuminate the present and predict the future. From the world’s first cyberattack in 1834 to 19th-century virtual reality, the Economist’s Tom Standage and Slate’s Seth Stevenson find the ancient ingenuity that our modern digital technology can learn from and expose age-old weaknesses we are already on a course to repeat.

    In the first episode: An 18th-century device called the Mechanical Turk convinced Europeans that a robot could play winning chess. But there was a trick. It’s a trick that companies like Amazon, Google, and Facebook still pull on us today. Guests include futurist Jaron Lanier and Luis von Ahn, founder of CAPTCHA and Duolingo.

    http://www.slate.com/articles/podcasts/secret_history_of_the_future/2018/09/a_200_year_old_chess_playing_robot_explains_the_internet.html

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  8. Designing for Everyone, Everywhere with Luke Wrobkewski | Overtime

    Our latest Overtime guest, Luke Wroblewski, is known best for humanizing technology. He’s the author of several web design books, has founded several start-ups that were later acquired, and he’s now the Product Director at Google.

    In this episode, Dan and Luke discuss the key ideas behind his book Mobile First and how that translates to building for devices today, why we should be data-informed not data-driven when it comes to building products, and what he learned from his time creating and building Bagcheck and Polar.

    https://overtime.simplecast.fm/luke-wroblewski

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  9. In 1968, computers got personal: How the ‘mother of all demos’ changed the world

    A 90-minute presentation in 1968 showed off the earliest desktop computer system. In the process it introduced the idea that technology could make individuals better – if government funded research.

    https://theconversation.com/in-1968-computers-got-personal-how-the-mother-of-all-demos-changed-the-world-101654

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  10. Presentable #51: An Oral History of Web Standards With Jeffrey Zeldman - Relay FM

    Designer, author, speaker, publisher, podcaster and longtime friend Jeffrey Zeldman joins the show to reminisce on the origin of the Web Standards Project and it’s legacy 20 years on.

    https://www.relay.fm/presentable/51

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