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Tagged with “technology” (374)

  1. Non Breaking Space Show #94: Q&A Panel from the World Movie Premiere of “What Comes Next is the Future” - Goodstuff FM

    For this episode, we have the Q&A panel after the world premiere of Matt Griffin’s documentary, "What Comes Next is the Future."

    The premiere took place at Code & Supply’s Abstraction conference in Pittsburgh, PA on August 18th.

    http://goodstuff.fm/nbsp/94

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. 32 Dots Per Spaceship (Or, the Videogame That Changed Tech History)

    A look back at the origins of Spacewar!, the first original video game and one of the most influential pieces of software ever written. With special guests Stewart Brand and Spacewar! creator Steve Russell.

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/wonderland-podcast/32-dots-per-spaceship-or-the-videogame-that-changed-tech-history
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Sat, 10 Sep 2016 21:51:54 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Virtual Memories Show #182: Virginia Heffernan

    Cultural critic Virginia Heffernan joins the show to talk about her new book, Magic and Loss: The Internet as Art (Simon & Schuster)! We talk about what’s behind the screen, why the internet is bigger than the Industrial Revolution, her first experience online in 1979, what it’s like to be in a piece of performance art with half the world’s population, her crushing defeat at meeting Joan Didion, why she’s nostalgic for landline phones, the motive motive of Pokemon Go, asking The New York Times to host a shred-guitar competition, and why there’s value in Reading The Comments!

    http://chimeraobscura.com/vm/episode-182-Virginia-Heffernan

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Seth Lloyd: Quantum Computer Reality - The Long Now

    The 15th-century Renaissance was triggered, Lloyd began, by a flood of new information which changed how people thought about everything, and the same thing is happening now.

    All of us have had to shift, just in the last couple decades, from hungry hunters and gatherers of information to overwhelmed information filter-feeders.

    Information is physical.

    A bit can be represented by an electron here to signify 0, and there to signify 1.

    Information processing is moving electrons from here to there.

    But for a “qubit" in a quantum computer, an electron is both here and there at the same time, thanks to "wave-particle duality.”

    Thus with “quantum parallelism” you can do massively more computation than in classical computers.

    It’s like the difference between the simple notes of plainsong and all that a symphony can do—a huge multitude of instruments interacting simultaneously, playing arrays of sharps and flats and complex chords.

    Quantum computers can solve important problems like enormous equations and factoring—cracking formerly uncrackable public-key cryptography, the basis of all online commerce.

    With their ability to do “oodles of things at once," quantum computers can also simulate the behavior of larger quantum systems, opening new frontiers of science, as Richard Feynman pointed out in the 1980s.

    Simple quantum computers have been built since 1995, by Lloyd and ever more others.

    Mechanisms tried so far include: electrons within electric fields; nuclear spin (clockwise and counter); atoms in ground state and excited state simultaneously; photons polarized both horizontally and vertically; and super-conducting loops going clockwise and counter-clockwise at the same time; and many more.

    To get the qubits to perform operations—to compute—you can use an optical lattice or atoms in whole molecules or integrated circuits, and more to come.

    The more qubits, the more interesting the computation.

    Starting with 2 qubits back in 1996, some systems are now up to several dozen qubits.

    Over the next 5-10 years we should go from 50 qubits to 5,000 qubits, first in special-purpose systems but eventually in general-purpose computers.

    Lloyd added, “And there’s also the fascinating field of using funky quantum effects such as coherence and entanglement to make much more accurate sensors, imagers, and detectors.”

    Like, a hundred thousand to a million times more accurate.

    GPS could locate things to the nearest micron instead of the nearest meter.

    Even with small quantum computers we will be able to expand the capability of machine learning by sifting vast collections of data to detect patterns and move on from supervised-learning (“That squiggle is a 7”) toward unsupervised-learning—systems that learn to learn.

    The universe is a quantum computer, Lloyd concluded.

    Biological life is all about extracting meaningful information from a sea of bits.

    For instance, photosynthesis uses quantum mechanics in a very sophisticated way to increase its efficiency.

    Human life is expanding on what life has always been—an exercise in machine learning.

    —Stewart Brand

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02016/aug/09/quantum-computer-reality/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Wonderland Podcast Episode 1: Babbage and the Dancer

    An eight-year-old boy’s encounter with a robotic toy doll ends up changing the course of technological history. With special guests Ken Goldberg and Kate Darling, we look at the uncanny world of emotional robotics. What if the dystopian future turns out to be one where the robots conquer humanity with their cuteness?

    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/wonderland-podcast
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Mon, 15 Aug 2016 20:22:40 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. 47: Sara Soueidan - Ditching Icon Fonts for SVG | Full Stack Radio

    In this episode, Adam talks to Sara Soueidan about the benefits of using SVG over icon fonts, and the best workflow for using SVG in your projects.

    http://www.fullstackradio.com/47

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Bret Victor - The Humane Representation of Thought

    Closing keynote at the UIST and SPLASH conferences, October 2014. Preface:

    http://worrydream.com/TheHumaneRepresentationOfThought/note.html

    References to baby-steps towards some of the concepts mentioned:

    Dynamic reality (physical responsiveness): - The primary work here is Hiroshi Ishii’s "Radical Atoms": http://tangible.media.mit.edu/project/inform/ - but also relevant are the "Soft Robotics" projects at Harvard: http://softroboticstoolkit.com - and at Otherlab: http://youtube.com/watch?v=gyMowPAJwqo - and some of the more avant-garde corners of material science and 3D printing

    Dynamic conversations and presentations: - Ken Perlin’s "Chalktalk" changes daily; here’s a recent demo: http://bit.ly/1x5eCOX

    Context-sensitive reading material: - http://worrydream.com/MagicInk/ "Explore-the-model" reading material: - http://worrydream.com/ExplorableExplanations/ - http://worrydream.com/LadderOfAbstraction/ - http://ncase.me/polygons/ - http://redblobgames.com/pathfinding/a-star/introduction.html - http://earthprimer.com/

    Evidence-backed models: - http://worrydream.com/TenBrighterIdeas/

    Direct-manipulation dynamic authoring: - http://worrydream.com/StopDrawingDeadFish/ - http://worrydream.com/DrawingDynamicVisualizationsTalk/ - http://tobyschachman.com/Shadershop/ Modes of understanding: - Jero…

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=agOdP2Bmieg
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Wed, 10 Aug 2016 07:45:46 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Alex Langley’s Tech Chat Episode 14 - Has digital technology changed everything or has it changed nothing?

    Lizzie Hodgson, all round digital innovator, and Jeremy Keith, co-founder of Clearleft, join Alex in the studio to work out whether digital technology has changed everything or has it changed nothing.

    http://techchatuk.com/#episodes

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Thomas Thwaites: How I built a toaster — from scratch | TED Talk | TED.com

    It takes an entire civilization to build a toaster. Designer Thomas Thwaites found out the hard way, by attempting to build one from scratch: mining ore for steel, deriving plastic from oil … it’s frankly amazing he got as far as he got. A parable of our interconnected society, for designers and consumers alike.

    http://www.ted.com/talks/thomas_thwaites_how_i_built_a_toaster_from_scratch?language=en

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Kevin Kelly: The Next 30 Digital Years - The Long Now

    IN KEVIN KELLY’S VIEW, a dozen “inevitable” trends will drive the next 30 years of digital progress. Countless artificial smartnesses, for example, will be added to everything, all quite different from human intelligence and from each other. We will tap into them like we do into electricity to become cyber-centaurs — co-dependent humans and AIs. All of us will need to perpetually upgrade just to stay in the game.

    Every possible surface that can become a display will become a display, and will study its watchers. Everything we encounter, “if it cannot interact, it is broken.” Virtual and augmented reality (VR and AR) will become the next platform after smartphones, conveying a profound sense of experience (and shared experience), transforming education (“it burns different circuits in your brain”), and making us intimately trackable. Everything will be tracked, monitored, sensored, and imaged, and people will go along with it because “vanity trumps privacy,”as already proved on Facebook. “Wherever attention flows, money will follow.”

    Access replaces ownership for suppliers as well as consumers. Uber owns no cars; AirBnB owns no real estate. On-demand rules. Sharing rules. Unbundling rules. Makers multiply. “In thirty years the city will look like it does now because we will have rearranged the flows, not the atoms. We will have a different idea of what a city is, and who we are, and how we relate to other people.”

    In the Q&A, Kelly was asked what worried him. “Cyberwar,” he said. “We have no rules. Is it okay to take out an adversary’s banking system? Disasters may have to occur before we get rules. We’re at the point that any other civilization in the galaxy would have a world government. I have no idea how to do that.”

    Kelly concluded: “We are at the beginning of the beginning — the first hour of day one. There have never been more opportunities. The greatest products of the next 25 years have not been invented yet.

    “You‘re not late.“

    —Stewart Brand

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02016/jul/14/next-30-digital-years/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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