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Tagged with “technology” (427)

  1. Ethics, technology and the impact of our decisions on customers and employees | Adrian Swinscoe

    Ethics, technology and the impact of our decisions on customers and employees - Interview with Cennydd Bowles, a designer and writer focusing on the ethics of emerging technologies. Cennydd joins me today to talk about ethics, technology, emerging technology, design and the impact of the decisions we make on customers and employees. This interview follows on from my recent interview – The Age Of Agile and why agile is more than a tool or method – Interview with Steve Denning – and is number 251 in the series of interviews with authors and business leaders that are doing great things, providing valuable insights, helping businesses innovate and delivering great service and experience to both their customers and their employees.

    http://www.adrianswinscoe.com/ethics-technology-and-the-impact-of-our-decisions-on-customers-and-employees-interview-with-cennydd-bowles/

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  2. Charles C. Mann: The Wizard and the Prophet - The Long Now

    Two ways to save humanity

    Mann titled his talk “The Edge of the Petri Dish.”

    He explained, “If you drop a couple protozoa in a Petri dish filled with nutrient goo, they will multiply until they run out of resources or drown in their own wastes.”

    Humans in the world Petri dish appear to be similarly doomed, judging by our exponential increases in population, energy use, water use, income, and greenhouse gases.

    How to save humanity?

    Opposing grand approaches emerged from two remarkable scientists in the mid-20th century who fought each other their entire lives.

    Their solutions were so persuasive that their impassioned argument continues 70 years later to dominate how we think about dealing with the still-exacerbating exponential impacts.

    Norman Borlaug, the one Mann calls “the Wizard,” was a farm kid trained as a forester.

    In 1944 he found himself in impoverished Mexico with an impossible task—solve the ancient fungal killer of wheat, rust.

    First he invented high-volume crossbreeding, then shuttle breeding (between winter wheat and spring wheat), and then semi-dwarf wheat.

    The resulting package of hybrid seeds, synthetic fertilizer, and irrigation became the Green Revolution that ended most of hunger throughout the world for the first time in history.

    There were costs.

    The diversity of crops went down.

    Excess fertilizer became a pollutant.

    Agriculture industrialized at increasing scale, and displaced smallhold farmers fled to urban slums.

    William Vogt, who Mann calls “the Prophet,” was a poor city kid who followed his interest in birds to become an isolated researcher on the revolting guano islands of Peru.

    He discovered that periodic massive bird die-offs on the islands were caused by the El Niño cycle pushing the Humboldt Current with its huge load of anchovetas away from the coast and starving the birds.

    The birds were, Vogt declared, subject to an inescapable “carrying capacity.“

    That became the foundational idea of the environmental movement, later expressed in terms such as “limits to growth,” “ecological overshoot,” and “planetary boundaries.”

    Vogt spelled out the worldview in his powerful 1948 book, The Road to Survival.

    The Prophets-versus-Wizards debate keeps on raging—artisanal organic farming versus factory-like mega-farms; distributed solar energy versus centralized fossil fuel refineries and nuclear power plants; dealing with climate change by planting a zillion trees versus geoengineering with aerosols in the stratosphere.

    The question continues: How do we best manage our world Petri dish?

    Restraint?

    Or innovation?

    Can humanity change its behavior at planet scale?

    Mann ended by pointing out that in 1800 slavery was universal in the world and had been throughout history.

    Then it ended.

    How?

    Prophets say that morally committed abolitionists did it.

    Wizards say that clever labor-saving machinery did it.

    Maybe it was the combination.

    —Stewart Brand

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02018/jan/22/wizard-and-prophet/

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  3. How a new technology is changing the lives of people who cannot speak – podcast | News | The Guardian

    Millions are robbed of the power of speech by illness, injury or lifelong conditions. Can the creation of bespoke digital voices transform their ability to communicate?

    https://www.theguardian.com/news/audio/2018/jan/29/how-a-new-technology-is-changing-the-lives-of-people-who-cannot-speak-podcast

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Presentable #38: Design vs Capitalism - Relay FM

    My good friend Erika Hall returns to the show. She’s a founder and principal at Mule Design, and author of the forthcoming book "Conversational Design."

    https://www.relay.fm/presentable/38

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  5. Did You Get the Memo? | Dell Technologies United States

    Communication’s come a long way since the days of Samuel Morse. We crack the code on how it’s evolved in this episode.

    https://www.delltechnologies.com/en-us/perspectives/podcasts/trailblazers/s02-e02-did-you-get-the-memo.htm#autoplay=false&autoexpand=true&episode=201&transcript=false

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  6. Jaron Lanier on the Future of the Internet - The New Yorker Radio Hour - WNYC

    The Internet was built by idealists who believed that greater access to information would inevitably lead to better outcomes for humanity. Jaron Lanier was one of those utopians, a pioneering inventor of virtual reality. But Lanier calls the Web as it has evolved a “giant manipulation service,” and he fears that virtual reality, the next frontier of tech innovation, could absorb the misogyny of gamer culture. Nicholas Thompson, the editor of newyorker.com, asks Lanier if there’s a way to do things better.  

    https://www.wnyc.org/story/jaron-lanier-on-the-internet/

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  7. Computer Vision, with Léonie Watson

    In this episode we’re talking about computer vision, or “computers with eyes”. No Rosie, but we’re ably compensated by talking to rehab’s own Camille Bourdier and Zuzanna Rosinska. Plus special guest Léonie Watson of the Paciello Group joins us to talk about how computer vision aids accessibility and brings new opportunities to users with vision impairment.

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/rehabstudio/computer-vision-with-leonie-watson
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Wed, 06 Dec 2017 11:38:03 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. David Weinberger: “Everything is Miscellaneous” | Talks at Google

    Author David Weinberger discusses his book "Everything Is Miscellaneous" as part of the Authors@Google series. David Weinberger is the co-author of the international bestseller "The Cluetrain Manifesto" and the author of "Small Pieces Loosely Joined". A fellow at Harvard Law School’s Berkman Center for the Internet and Society, Weinberger writes for such publications as Wired, The New York Times, Smithsonian, and the Harvard Business Review and is a frequent commentator for NPR’s All Things Considered. This event took place May 10, 2007 at Google Headquarters in Mountain View, CA.

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=43DZEy_J694
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Mon, 27 Nov 2017 17:29:36 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  9. Dave Winer on The Open Web, Blogging, Podcasting and More | Internet History Podcast

    Dave Winer has been called the godfather of a lot of things. The godfather of blogging. The Godfather of Podcasting. One of the key people involved in the development of RSS. But as you’ll hear in this great and wide ranging chat, Dave Winer is just a software developer who has never stopped tinkering, never lost his interest in coming up with new tools and new technologies. Dave was kind enough to sit down and go over his whole career, from the very earliest days of the PC era, to the present day.

    http://www.internethistorypodcast.com/2017/10/dave-winer-on-the-open-web-blogging-podcasting-and-more/

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  10. Tabetha Boyajian: The most mysterious star in the universe | TED Talk

    Something massive, with roughly 1,000 times the area of Earth, is blocking the light coming from a distant star known as KIC 8462852, and nobody is quite sure what it is. As astronomer Tabetha Boyajian investigated this perplexing celestial object, a colleague suggested something unusual: Could it be an alien-built megastructure? Such an extraordinary idea would require extraordinary evidence. In this talk, Boyajian gives us a look at how scientists search for and test hypotheses when faced with the unknown.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/tabetha_boyajian_the_most_mysterious_star_in_the_universe

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