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Tagged with “technology” (365)

  1. Kevin Kelly: The Next 30 Digital Years - The Long Now

    IN KEVIN KELLY’S VIEW, a dozen “inevitable” trends will drive the next 30 years of digital progress. Countless artificial smartnesses, for example, will be added to everything, all quite different from human intelligence and from each other. We will tap into them like we do into electricity to become cyber-centaurs — co-dependent humans and AIs. All of us will need to perpetually upgrade just to stay in the game.

    Every possible surface that can become a display will become a display, and will study its watchers. Everything we encounter, “if it cannot interact, it is broken.” Virtual and augmented reality (VR and AR) will become the next platform after smartphones, conveying a profound sense of experience (and shared experience), transforming education (“it burns different circuits in your brain”), and making us intimately trackable. Everything will be tracked, monitored, sensored, and imaged, and people will go along with it because “vanity trumps privacy,”as already proved on Facebook. “Wherever attention flows, money will follow.”

    Access replaces ownership for suppliers as well as consumers. Uber owns no cars; AirBnB owns no real estate. On-demand rules. Sharing rules. Unbundling rules. Makers multiply. “In thirty years the city will look like it does now because we will have rearranged the flows, not the atoms. We will have a different idea of what a city is, and who we are, and how we relate to other people.”

    In the Q&A, Kelly was asked what worried him. “Cyberwar,” he said. “We have no rules. Is it okay to take out an adversary’s banking system? Disasters may have to occur before we get rules. We’re at the point that any other civilization in the galaxy would have a world government. I have no idea how to do that.”

    Kelly concluded: “We are at the beginning of the beginning — the first hour of day one. There have never been more opportunities. The greatest products of the next 25 years have not been invented yet.

    “You‘re not late.“

    —Stewart Brand

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02016/jul/14/next-30-digital-years/

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  2. BBC Radio 4 - Computing Britain, Connected Thinking

    Long before the heroics of the world wide web, the internet was born out of a mixture of American ambition and British thrift. Packet Switching was the name coined by Welsh computer scientist Donald Davies in an effort to link the early computers in the labs of the National Physical Laboratory in Teddington.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b069xdy3

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  3. BBC Radio 4 - Computing Britain, ERNIE Picks Prizes

    In 1956, adverts enticed the British public with a brand new opportunity. Buy premium bonds for one pound, for the chance to win a thousand. At the time, it was a fortune - half the price of the average house.

    Behind this tantalising dream was a machine called ERNIE - the Electronic Random Number Indicator Equipment.

    ERNIE was built by the team who constructed Colossus, the code-breaking engine housed at Bletchley Park. They had just nine months to make a machine that generated random numbers using all the latest kit, from printed circuit boards to metal transistors.

    In this episode, mathematician Hannah Fry talks to Dr Tilly Blyth from the Science Museum about how ERNIE became an unlikely celebrity. Featuring archive from NS&I, the Science Museum and the BBC Library.

    Presented by Hannah Fry

    Produced by Michelle Martin

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b069wzvw

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  4. BBC Radio 4 - Computing Britain, LEO the Electronic Office

    Hannah Fry hears the incredible story of how a chain of British teashops produced the first office computer in the world.

    J Lyons and Company was the UK’s largest catering company, with 250 teashops across the country. They also owned their own bakeries, a tea plantation and haulage firm, as Dr Tilly Blyth from the Science Museum describes.

    By the 1950s, this vast business was drowning in paperwork. Lyons embarked on an ambitious new project to build a machine called LEO - the Lyons Electronic Office.

    Their office computer was based on the giant calculating machines being built inside UK universities to solve mathematical equations

    Sure, these machines could manage maths, but could they handle catering?

    Featuring archive from the British Library, the Science Museum and the LEO Society.

    Presented by Hannah Fry

    Produced by Michelle Martin

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b069rvb4

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. BBC Radio 4 - Computing Britain, Electronic Brains

    From the mobile phone to the office computer, mathematician Hannah Fry looks back at 70 years of computing history, to reveal the UK’s lead role in developing the technology we use today.

    In the first episode, she travels back to the 1940s, to hear the incredible story of the creation, in Britain, of the computer memory.

    Three teams from across the country - in Teddington, Manchester and Cambridge - were tasked with designing automatic calculating engines for university research. But which team would be first to crack the tricky problem of machine memory?

    Meanwhile, tabloid headlines proclaimed that engineers were building ‘electronic brains’ that could match, and maybe surpass, the human brain, starting a debate about automation and artificial intelligence that still resonates today.

    Featuring archive from the Science Museum and the BBC Library, plus an interview with technology historian Dr James Sumner from Manchester University.

    Presented by Hannah Fry

    Produced by Michelle Martin

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b069r3rt

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Kevin Kelly: How technology evolves | TED Talk | TED.com

    Tech enthusiast Kevin Kelly asks "What does technology want?" and discovers that its movement toward ubiquity and complexity is much like the evolution of life.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/kevin_kelly_on_how_technology_evolves?language=en

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  7. ‘“I voted Remain,” said Pooh,’ with Rachel Andrew | Unfinished Business

    I’m warning you now, it’s a very different kind of episode of Unfinished Business this week as Rachel Andrew and I talk about our feelings on the referendum result for the UK to leave the EU. We talk about the issues that will affect us, you and our businesses in the coming months and years and what we’re already doing to help mitigate them.

    http://www.unfinished.bz/121

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  8. Kevin Kelly on The Inevitable, 60s Counterculture, and How to Read Better

    This week I was lucky enough to interview one of my favorite people: Kevin Kelly.

    Tim Ferriss refers to Kevin as the real-life, “Most Interesting Man In The World.”

    Kevin Kelly is one of the co-founders of Wired Magazine, a co-founder of the Quantified Self Movement, and serves on the board of The Long Now foundation.

    I’ve been endlessly inspired by Kevin. And it wouldn’t be fair not to mentioned his very early beginnings where he spent most of his 20s as a nomad (of sorts) traveling through Asia as a photographer for most of his 20s. He later published a book of his work titled Asia Grace.

    From there, in the 80s he joined Stewart Brand as the publisher and editor of The Whole Earth Review and was influential in both the 80s counterculture and startup movement.

    His writing in the 90s more or less predicted the Internet of today. His first book, Out of Control is brilliant – a few years after it was released it became required reading for all the actors on the set of the movie The Matrix. (which is how I first learned about it).

    He also has one of my favorite This American Life stories where has something of an epiphany about life, decides to live his life as if he will be dead in 6 months… gives away all his possessions, and then rides his bike across the country.

    In this episode we talk about:

    The Counterculture movement of the 60s

    Traveling as an act of rebellion

    Kevin’s latest book The Inevitable in which he writes that, “Much of what will happen in the next thirty years is inevitable, driven by technological trends that are already in motion.” He’ll share some of those predictions with us.

    Lessons on how to read better

    And… a book that Kevin wishes everyone in the world read at least one time.

    http://castig.org/kevin-kelly-on-the-inevitable-60s-counterculture-and-how-to-read-better/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Alex Langley’s Tech Chat

    Monthly technology chat show bringing you the latest news and developments with a distinctly British slant.

    Lars Hyland a genuine guru on digital learning and Rosa Fox an actual software developer and organiser of codebar Brighton join me in the studio talking about insecure passwords and we all get takeaway delivered

    http://techchatuk.com/#episodes

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. The potential of quantum computing – Science Weekly podcast | Science | The Guardian

    Ian Sample explores the journey from logic to modern computers.

    The annual Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition shows off the best of British science, highlighting the place of scientific innovation at the heart of our culture, and of our economic wellbeing.

    The exhibition dates back to the early 19th century, when the Royal Society’s president invited guests to his home to inspect collections of scientific instruments and other objects illustrating the newest scientific research.

    These days it’s an exhibition with a huge range of events, and on this and next week’s podcast we’ll be looking at four of them.

    This week we’re going to explore the impact maths and logic has had on modern computing, and whether quantum computing is a realistic prospect.

    Ian Sample is joined down the line by Vlatko Vedral, professor of physics at Oxford University. In the studio is Patrick Fitzpatrick, emeritus professor of mathematics at University College Cork, the Guardian’s science correspondent Hannah Devlin, and Phil Oldfield, our British Science Association media fellow.

    Patrick Fitzpatrick was speaking at the Royal Society alongside Emanuele Pelucchi, Head of the Science Foundation Ireland Principal Investigator Grant Group at Tyndall National Institute-University College Cork.

    https://www.theguardian.com/science/audio/2015/jul/03/quantum-computing-science-podcast

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