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Tagged with “spoolcast” (7)

  1. Stephen Hay – Responsive Web Design Workflow » UIE Brain Sparks

    The web is no longer fixed width. Designs are more malleable than ever because of fluid grids, media queries, and everything else that comes with responsive web design. This makes using static photoshop comps as a deliverable unmanageable. Design workflows inevitably have to change and adapt as the way we design for the web evolves.

    In his virtual seminar, Responsive Web Design Workflow, Stephen Hay outlines how his workflow has changed in the face of new design processes. He believes that taking a content first approach is instrumental to working with fluid designs. This allows you to mold the design around the content instead of trying to fit the content into a fixed design.

    The audience had a bunch of great questions during the live seminar. Stephen joins Adam Churchill for this podcast to answer some of those questions.

    http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2014/01/30/stephen-hay-responsive-web-design-workflow/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Nathan Curtis – Prototyping with HTML and CSS » UIE Brain Sparks

    Prototyping is an effective way to communicate design ideas. Static PDFs, PSDs, and wireframes can help get your point across but aren’t dynamic. Usually, any necessary changes are logged away as to-dos. They’re then taken back, fixed, and presented again.

    Nathan Curtis and the team at EightShapes are prototyping with HTML and CSS more in their design process. They find that employing these techniques leads to greater efficiency. Changes are updated as they’re being discussed, the team arrives at a consensus, and moves on.

    With many teams transitioning to an Agile development process, prototyping in HTML fits in perfectly. Being able to have discussions and make those design decisions in real time strengthens team cohesion.

    During this podcast, Nathan and Jared Spool discuss prototyping techniques in greater depth. Nathan is also presenting one of the daylong workshops at the User Interface 17 conference in Boston, November 5-7. For more information about Nathan’s and the other workshops, visit UIConf.com.

    http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2012/08/30/nathan-curtis-prototyping-with-html-and-css/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Luke Wroblewski – Designing Multi-Device User Experiences

    Context is an important consideration in designing a mobile experience. As new devices enter the market, designers have to contend with new form factors and consider things such as ergonomics. Even things such as Apple’s retina displays affect approaches to design.

    Luke Wroblewski, author of Mobile First, is at the forefront of mobile design. He says that designers need to make sure their designs are fluid and flexible. Starting with a fluid grid at a foundational level ensures that your design can adapt to a variety of viewports.

    In addition, Luke says you want to take multiple screen resolutions into account. Instead of relying on images, he suggests employing cascading style sheets and SVG. This will make sure that graphics scale appropriately to different sizes and devices.

    Luke explores this topic further with Jared Spool in this podcast. He is also is presenting one of the daylong workshops at the User Interface 17 conference in Boston, November 5-7. Learn more about the Luke’s and the other workshops at uiconf.com.

    http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2012/08/10/luke-wroblewski-designing-multi-device-user-experiences/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Brian Suda – Designing with Data

    A data visualization, when done well, can be an incredibly powerful way to communicate information. It ultimately boils down to the choices you make in how to design and present the data. If you make the wrong choice you can run the risk of not accurately displaying the data or struggling to effectively tell its story.

    Brian Suda, author of A Practical Guide to Designing with Data, believes experimentation is a big part of arriving at the right choices. As ideas end up on the cutting room floor, not only do you arrive at a great visualization, but you’re building your toolbox along the way. This practice and experimentation leaves you with a template to apply to future projects.

    Essentially, arriving at the right choices now allows you to make better choices later. If you learn the best ways to represent different types of data, you can then apply that knowledge to any data sets you may have to visualize.

    Brian will be sharing his insights on data visualizations in his virtual seminar, The Design Choices You Make for Information: How to Create Great Data Visualizations, on Thursday, May 17. You won’t want to miss out on Brian’s pragmatic tips and techniques. Save your spot in Brian’s seminar.

    As always, we love to hear what you’re thinking. Share your thoughts with us in our comments section.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. SpoolCast: Visual Design Essentials for Non-Designers with Dan Rubin » UIE Brain Sparks

    Visual design is often considered an artistic realm. Many times people shy away from design or limit their involvement despite being completely capable of creating a great design. Learning the basics of design can help dispel the notion that it is only for the artistic. According to Dan Rubin, “there’s a big separation between being artistic and being creative.”

    Dan is a highly accomplished user interface designer and usability consultant. He conducted a UIE Virtual Seminar called Visual Design Essentials for Non-Designers. So many questions were generated that we couldn’t address them all during the session. Today we’re bringing you the follow up podcast in which Dan tackles those remaining questions.

    http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2011/02/03/spoolcast-visual-design-essentials-for-non-designers-with-dan-rubin/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Designing Social Interfaces

    Jared Spool interviews Erin Malone and Christian Crumlish, authors of the new book, Designing Social Interfaces. An outgrowth from creating the Yahoo! Design Pattern Library, the book is a perfect repository for anyone planning, designing, and building social aspects into their applications.

    Jared discusses several points with Erin and Christian, including,

    • How the book became a huge collection of social design elements and how people are using Designing Social Interfaces in the wild
    • Could a better understanding of social design patterns have helped Google launch Buzz with less blowback?
    • Expecting to build a community on your site, versus leveraging existing communities (for example, Facebook Connect)
    • The growth of social in new contexts (mobile, new audiences)

    From http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2010/04/09/spoolcast-crumlish-and-malone-design-the-social-in/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. SpoolCast: Roughing it with Interactive Prototypes

    Without planning, web apps have no where to go. Planning documents for web app projects are often overlooked, despite their importance in the success of the product. As a designer, no matter how great your research is, or how amazing your programmers are, if your planning documents do not develop well, your project will fail.

    One of the great user experience success stories in the U.K. is the Brighton-based agency Clearleft. They’ve developed successful, sophisticated methods of planning for their projects. James Box (UX) and Richard Rutter (Co-founder and Production Director) have been working on ways to plan highly interactive web apps that make the process more efficient.

    From http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2009/03/06/spoolcast-roughing-it-with-interactive-prototypes/

    —Huffduffed by adactio