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Tagged with “songs” (10)

  1. Troika #32: Tearjerker | Hicks Journal

    This is a Troika I’ve been planning for a while now, and it all started with listening to Spiritualized’s ‘Broken Heart’ from ‘Ladies and Gentlemen We’re Floating in Space’. I’ve always thought it was the most heart-wrenching thing I’d ever heard and it was the catalyst to thinking about a Troika of sad songs.

    1. Anais Mitchell – ‘Shepherd’
    2. Jarvis Cocker & Chilly Gonzales – ‘Tearjerker’
    3. Spiritualized – ‘Broken Heart’
    4. Kate Bush – ‘This Womans’ Work’
    5. Nick Cave (featuring Else Torp) – ‘Distant Sky’
    6. Radiohead – ‘Harry Patch (In Memory Of)’

    https://hicksdesign.co.uk/journal/troika-32-tearjerker

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. The King of Tears

    Revisionist History goes to Nashville to talk with Bobby Braddock, who has written more sad songs than almost anyone else. What is it about music that makes us cry? And what sets country music apart?

    http://revisionisthistory.com/episodes/16-the-king-of-tears

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. BBC Radio 4 - Seriously…, Songs for the Dead

    Marie-Louise Muir explores the tradition of keening for the dead in Ireland.

    Keeners were the women of rural Ireland who were traditionally paid to cry, wail and sing over the bodies of the dead at funerals and wakes. Their role was to help channel the grief of the bereaved and they had an elevated, almost mythical status among their communities. The custom of keening had all but vanished by the 1950’s as people began to view it as primitive, old-fashioned and uncivilised.

    Now, broadcaster Marie-Louise Muir sets out to ask what’s been lost with the passing of the keeners.

    She travels to Inis Mor, a remote island off the west coast of Ireland, where one of Ireland’s last professional keeners - Brigid Mullin - was recorded by the song collector and archivist Sidney Robertson Cowell in the 1950’s. Brigid’s crackling, eerie evocation of sorrow echoes down the years to capture a tradition in its dying days - a ghostly remnant of another world.

    Dr Deirdre Ni Chonghaile is a native of Inis Mor and thinks modern funerals have taken on an almost Victorian dignity in a society that in general has become far less tolerant of extravagant displays of grief. Deirdre believes it was this very extravagance that helped lead to keening’s demise. Its emphasis on the body and human mortality was in direct conflict with the notion of a Christian afterlife and the influential role of the keening women may even have been regarded as a threat to the patriarchy of the Church.

    As the story of the keeners blends with the waves and winds of Ireland’s west coast, Marie-Louise reflects on the passing of this once rich tradition.

    Producer: Conor McKay.

    Recordings:

    Bridget Mullin with Sidney Robertson Cowell, keen performance and conversation. Smithsonian Folkways, Ralph Rinzler Archives.

    Neil O’Boyle, keen demonstration on fiddle. Irish Traditional Music Archive, Dublin

    Eithne Ni Uilleachan, ‘Grief’ from the album Bilingua (Gael Linn)

    The Gloaming ‘The Pilgrim’s Song’ from the album ‘2’ (Real World)

    Milk Carton Kids ‘Wish You Were Here’ (Anti/Epitaph)

    Brian Eno ‘The Ship’ (Warp)

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0455jf1

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Hear Leonard Cohen’s Final Interview : All Songs Considered : NPR

    The conversation with KCRW’s Chris Douridas was recorded just after Leonard Cohen’s 82nd birthday. The two talked about the singer’s health and final album, You Want It Darker.

    http://www.npr.org/sections/allsongs/2016/11/11/501659528/hear-one-of-leonard-cohens-final-interviews

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Hear Ryan Adams and Bob Mould Play Music And Talk About Everything Under The Sun : All Songs Considered : NPR

    Bob Mould has a new solo album, and Ryan Adams, who is a fan, invited the singer to his home studio for a rambling conversation that’s occasionally interrupted by the pair recording a song together.

    http://www.npr.org/sections/allsongs/2016/03/24/471733566/hear-ryan-adams-and-bob-mould-play-music-and-talk-about-everything-under-the-sun

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. All Songs +1: A Discussion With Neko Case And John Grant : All Songs Considered : NPR

    Two of our favorite musicians talk about carnival rides, their ideal collaboration and being sexier than ever in their mid-40s. Eavesdrop on a conversation between Neko Case and John Grant.

    http://www.npr.org/sections/allsongs/2015/10/23/450926316/all-songs-1-a-discussion-with-neko-case-and-john-grant

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. The spread of mondegreens should have ended with the Internet — but it hasn’t

    The Internet is supposed to be killing off misheard song lyrics, but think again. Those "mondegreens" are alive and well, even on the lyrics sites that try to end the confusion.

    http://www.pri.org/stories/2014-11-20/spread-mondegreens-should-have-ended-internet-it-hasnt

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Pete Seeger woke up America with songs across several cultures | Public Radio International

    The late Pete Seeger wrote his own songs about politics and culture, and also covered Cuban folk songs, African spirituals and traditional Irish tunes.

    http://www.pri.org/stories/2014-01-28/pete-seeger-woke-america-songs-across-several-cultures

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Bands That Should Be Bigger : All Songs Considered : NPR

    We recently asked listeners to tell us their picks for bands that should be bigger than they are, and we were surprised by how many we didn’t know. On this edition of All Songs Considered we share some of the discoveries we made, along with some of our own candidates for bands that should be bigger.

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/allsongs/2012/11/20/165580465/bands-that-should-be-bigger

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Music on Your Brain

    Music is more than just pitch and rhythm, timbre and tempo. Music can comfort. Or annoy. It helps us celebrate – and mourn. Music can foster a sense of group identity. (Consider national anthems.)

    Are human beings hard-wired to enjoy music? What role did music play in the evolution of human societies? What would life be without music?

    In this World Science Forum, we talk to Daniel Levitin, a neuroscientist at McGill University. He’s an expert on music cognition and the author of two books: This is Your Brain on Music and The World in Six Songs.

    Levitin argues that music is at the heart of human nature. The World’s Rhitu Chatterjee spoke with Levitin for The World Science Podcast.

    http://www.world-science.org/forum/music-brain-daniel-levitin/

    —Huffduffed by adactio