adactio / tags / social media

Tagged with “social media” (14)

  1. Zeynep Tufekci: We’re building a dystopia just to make people click on ads | TED Talk

    We’re building an artificial intelligence-powered dystopia, one click at a time, says techno-sociologist Zeynep Tufekci. In an eye-opening talk, she details how the same algorithms companies like Facebook, Google and Amazon use to get you to click on ads are also used to organize your access to political and social information. And the machines aren’t even the real threat. What we need to understand is how the powerful might use AI to control us — and what we can do in response.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/zeynep_tufekci_we_re_building_a_dystopia_just_to_make_people_click_on_ads/details

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. danah boyd — The Internet of the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly - | On Being

    Steeped in the cutting edge of research around the social lives of networked teens, danah boyd demystifies technology while being wise about the changes it’s making to life and relationship. She has intriguing advice on the technologically-fueled generation gaps of our age — that our children’s immersion in social media may offer a kind of respite from their over-structured, overscheduled analog lives. And that cyber-bullying is an online reflection of the offline world, and blaming technology is missing the point.

    https://onbeing.org/programs/danah-boyd-the-internet-of-the-good-the-bad-and-the-ugly-jul2017/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. 5by5 | The Big Web Show #149: Transatlantic: Hopping Continents With Sarah Parmenter

    Host @zeldman checks in with frequent guest @sazzy to discuss blogging, design, social media consulting, Britain, America, speaking, travel, and, oh, yes, that election.

    http://5by5.tv/bigwebshow/149

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. #573: Status Update — This American Life

    Most of the time, the updates we share about our lives are small and inconsequential. This week, status updates that interrupt daily life. We hear two friends talk about how one of them has become rich and famous. And an entire town gets a status update on itself.

    https://overcast.fm/+H20XAg

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Sexual Cyberbullying: The Modern Day Letter A

    These days, many teenagers live half their lives on social media sites, and they’re writing the rules as they go. One online trend 16-year-old Radio Rookie Temitayo Fagbenle finds disturbing is something she calls "slut-shaming," or using photos and videos to turn a girl’s private life inside out.

    There are countless websites, Facebook pages and Twitter handles that are created to shame girls online, many are literally called "exposing hos." When Temitayo logs in to Facebook her newsfeed is often inundated with sexually explicit photos and videos of other teenage girls that are posted, commented on, and shared countless times by her peers. Once these images make it online the repercussions can haunt a girl far beyond the schoolyard.

    "Once it gets to a social media network it’s over for her life," one of Temitayo’s classmates said. She gathered a group of girls from her school to talk about why so many teenagers, especially girls, harass each other online. "Girls do it to themselves," another girl explained, "half the time we can’t even blame guys."

    But another student pointed out that a lot of girls don’t even know they’re being recorded. She said, "it’s not fair that a guy can actually hide his phone, have sex with you and record you, and then show it to his friends, like, ‘Yo, look, look, look!’"

    That nightmare scenario was a reality for another one of Temitayo’s classmates. When the young girl was only 14, her boyfriend filmed a sexually explicit video of her without her knowledge and then posted it on Facebook and other social media sites. "He was going around holding his head high saying, “’Oh well, I was able to do this with her.’ He gave me a bad name," the girl said.

    Schools have had to take on a new role in the age of social media.

    Some students screenshot the cyberbullying they see online, print it out and bring it to their teachers as evidence. Erica Doyle, the Assistant Principal at Temitayo’s school said, "Once we’re dealing with digital media that is sexually explicit that has been captured and shared with the public, that actually now is a criminal matter."

    One of Temitayo’s male friends was arrested in the 8th grade for emailing a topless picture of his girlfriend to hundreds of students at their middle school. Temitayo asked him if he did it out of malice, but he brushed the question off and said he just thought it would be cool. "I regret doing it to her but still, I didn’t have to go to jail. Porn websites do it everyday."

    http://www.wnyc.org/shows/rookies/articles/radio-rookies/2012/dec/28/sexual-cyberbullying-modern-day-letter/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Interview: Tom Standage

    There is nothing new under the sun, says Ecclesiastes, and when it comes to social media Tom Standage has set out to prove the saying right. His day job is as a journalist and the digital editor at The Economist. But he’s also the author of a book called The Victorian Internet. And he’s got another in the pipeline called Cicero’s Web. I began by asking him about a technology which totally transformed Australian life in the Victorian era - the telegraph wire.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Twitter Lets Customers Skip Recordings, And Make Choices : All Tech Considered : NPR

    Once relegated to one-time promos and marketing campaigns, Twitter is now a tool businesses use to provide customer service. And for some customers, Twitter can be a deciding factor in what companies they do business with.

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/alltechconsidered/2012/08/15/158781405/twitter-lets-customers-skip-recordings-and-make-choices

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Sociability: how accessible is social media? - Life Matters - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    Social media has pretty much taken over the world in the last few years. For lots of us, it’s part of our everyday routine—possibly even an addiction for some—and it’s a brilliant way to connect and share with almost anyone we want to.

    But for many people living with a disability, the world of social media is just out of reach.

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/lifematters/disability-26-social-media/3908768

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Spark 109: Extreme crowdsourcing, the slow web, and motivation 3.0

    • Joanne McNeil of Tomorrow Museum explains her take on the iPad’s lack of multitasking
    • Apple announces multtiasking in iPhone OS 4
    • Nora mentions the Spark slow web toolkit and her full interview with Jeff MacIntyre
    • Tom Lucier‘s social media baby moratorium
    • Swiss Miss Tina Roth Eisenberg tries some extreme crowdsourcing (full interview)
    • Mayor Nicolai Wammen considers changing the name of Århus, Denmark, to Aarhus, Denmark
    • CBC Radio 3‘s Grant Lawrence uses failin.gs to ask, “What’s wrong with me?”
    • Daniel Pink on motivation 3.0
    • Daniel’s book is Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us

    Music and sound effects used in this episode:

    • Countdown by Corsica_S “oneSidedConversation” by airtone
    • “Slow Down” (1941) by King Cole Trio
    • “Humming” by fLako Music from “Music for Underwater Listening” by Podington Bear
    • “I’ll Never Fail You” (1938) by Teddy Wilson And His Orchestra
    • “Backed Vibes (clean)” by Kevin MacLeod

    For more information (and instructions) visit http://cbc.ca/podcasting

    http://www.cbc.ca/spark/2010/04/spark-109-april-11-13-2010/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Full Interview: Baratunde Thurston on Marketing Your Book in a Digital Age | Spark

    These days, authors are increasingly expected to do more than just, you know, write books. They’re expected to have a presence on social media, to have a public profile, and to connect with fans and potential new readers. Baratunde Thurston is taking that a step further. Actually, he’s taking it several steps further. He’s a comedian, Director of Digital for The Onion, and he’s the author of the forthcoming book, How to Be Black. He’s assembled a volunteer ‘street team’ to help market the book through word-of-mouth and social media, and is modeling the marketing of the book on a political campaign. Is this the future for all authors? And what if you’re a low profile person who just wants to write?

    http://www.cbc.ca/spark/2011/12/full-interview-baratunde-thurston-on-marketing-your-book-in-a-digital-age/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

Page 1 of 2Older