adactio / tags / singing

Tagged with “singing” (9)

  1. Barry Kerr Interview (Uilleann pipes, flute, singing)

    The Liam O’Flynn Award. Digging into the Irish Traditional Music Archive. Ulster hunting songs and mummers. Hare coursing. Life in Lurgan County Armagh. The Ceili House and legend of Seamus Tansey. Prehistoric cairns and building on the tradition. The magic of the session and finding inspiration in the music.

    https://www.blarneypilgrims.com/episodes/barry-kerr-uilleann-pipes-flute-singing

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Michael Walsh Interview (Flute, whistle, singing)

    " ‘England gave me everything I ever wanted.’ " The Quarehawk. Big Tom, Margo, the Manchester scene; Irish, English, and in-between. A love of England and making a whole out of two halves. Grieving, and crafting an album. Fathers, sons, boys, men. Asturias, the flute and identifying as one thing or another. Getting Kepa Junkera to play on your album. And so much more. Brilliant stuff.

    https://www.blarneypilgrims.com/episodes/michael-walsh-interview-flute-whistle-singing

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Eoghan Ó Ceannabháin Interview (Sean-nós, concertina, flute)

    Mitching classes to work on your music. Sean-nós: ‘My granny would have just called them songs.’ Tradition and change, art and technique and the soul of the thing. Writing in English, writing in Irish. Activism, collectivity and music as barriers against despair. https://www.blarneypilgrims.com/episodes/eoghan-ceannabhin-interview-sean-nos-concertina-flute

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. BBC Radio 4 - Seriously…, Songs for the Dead

    Marie-Louise Muir explores the tradition of keening for the dead in Ireland.

    Keeners were the women of rural Ireland who were traditionally paid to cry, wail and sing over the bodies of the dead at funerals and wakes. Their role was to help channel the grief of the bereaved and they had an elevated, almost mythical status among their communities. The custom of keening had all but vanished by the 1950’s as people began to view it as primitive, old-fashioned and uncivilised.

    Now, broadcaster Marie-Louise Muir sets out to ask what’s been lost with the passing of the keeners.

    She travels to Inis Mor, a remote island off the west coast of Ireland, where one of Ireland’s last professional keeners - Brigid Mullin - was recorded by the song collector and archivist Sidney Robertson Cowell in the 1950’s. Brigid’s crackling, eerie evocation of sorrow echoes down the years to capture a tradition in its dying days - a ghostly remnant of another world.

    Dr Deirdre Ni Chonghaile is a native of Inis Mor and thinks modern funerals have taken on an almost Victorian dignity in a society that in general has become far less tolerant of extravagant displays of grief. Deirdre believes it was this very extravagance that helped lead to keening’s demise. Its emphasis on the body and human mortality was in direct conflict with the notion of a Christian afterlife and the influential role of the keening women may even have been regarded as a threat to the patriarchy of the Church.

    As the story of the keeners blends with the waves and winds of Ireland’s west coast, Marie-Louise reflects on the passing of this once rich tradition.

    Producer: Conor McKay.

    Recordings:

    Bridget Mullin with Sidney Robertson Cowell, keen performance and conversation. Smithsonian Folkways, Ralph Rinzler Archives.

    Neil O’Boyle, keen demonstration on fiddle. Irish Traditional Music Archive, Dublin

    Eithne Ni Uilleachan, ‘Grief’ from the album Bilingua (Gael Linn)

    The Gloaming ‘The Pilgrim’s Song’ from the album ‘2’ (Real World)

    Milk Carton Kids ‘Wish You Were Here’ (Anti/Epitaph)

    Brian Eno ‘The Ship’ (Warp)

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0455jf1

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Emmylou Harris And Rodney Crowell: Harmonizing To That ‘Old Yellow Moon’ : NPR

    Emmylou Harris and Rodney Crowell have been friends and collaborators since they first met in 1974. While they always wanted to make an album together, they never got around to it until now. Old Yellow Moon includes songs by Crowell, Patti Scialfa, Johnny Cash, and Kris Kristofferson among others.

    http://www.npr.org/2013/03/28/175490125/emmylou-harris-and-rodney-crowell-harmonizing-to-that-old-yellow-moon

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. The Night Singers of Brighton

    Across the Atlantic in a tiny village in Newfoundland, residents sing a New Year’s carol brought from Europe with the first English and Irish settlers, and handed down through centuries in the oral tradition. For generations villagers have walked from house to house, entered darkened kitchens after midnight, and have sung the carol as occupants listened in the darkness. Producer Chris Brookes tracked down the village carolers and follows them on their rounds as they sing their medieval melodies.

    For futher info on the village: http://ca.epodunk.com/profiles/newfoundland-and-labrador/brighton/2000303.html

    —Huffduffed by adactio