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Tagged with “search” (10)

  1. James Gleick: Time Travel - The Long Now

    Time travel is time research

    Gleick began with H.G. Wells’s 1895 book The Time Machine, which created the idea of time travel.

    It soon became a hugely popular genre that shows no sign of abating more than a century later.

    “Science fiction is a way of working out ideas,” Gleick said.

    Wells thought of himself as a futurist, and like many at the end of the 19th century he was riveted by the idea of progress, so his fictional traveler headed toward the far future.

    Other authors soon explored travel to the past and countless paradoxes ranging from squashed butterflies that change later elections to advising one’s younger self.

    Gleick invited audience members to query themselves: If you could travel in time, would you go to the future or to the past?

    When exactly, and where exactly?

    And why.

    And what is your second choice?

    (Try it, reader.)

    “We’re still trying to figure out what time is,” Gleick said.

    Time travel stories apparently help us.

    The inventor of the time machine in Wells’s book explains archly that time is merely a fourth dimension.

    Ten years later in 1905 Albert Einstein made that statement real.

    In 1941 Jorge Luis Borges wrote the celebrated short story, “The Garden of Forking Paths.”

    In 1955 physicist Hugh Everett introduced the quantum-based idea of forking universes, which itself has become a staple of science fiction.

    “Time,” Richard Feynman once joked, “is what happens when nothing else happens.”

    Gleick suggests, “Things change, and time is how we keep track.”

    Virginia Woolf wrote, “What more terrifying revelation can there be than that it is the present moment?

    That we survive the shock at all is only possible because the past shelters us on one side, the future on another.”

    To answer the last question of the evening, about how his views about time changed during the course of writing Time Travel, Gleick said:

    I thought I would conclude that the main thing to understand is: Enjoy the present.

    Don’t waste your brain cells agonizing about lost opportunities or worrying about what the future will bring.

    As I was working on the book I suddenly realized that that’s terrible advice.

    A potted plant lives in the now.

    The idea of the ‘long now’ embraces the past and the future and asks us to think about the whole stretch of time.

    That’s what I think time travel is good for.

    That’s what makes us human—the ability to live in the past and live in the future at the same time.

    —Stewart Brand

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02017/jun/05/time-travel/

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  2. Internet Archive founder Brewster Kahle on Recode Decode - Recode

    On this episode of Recode Decode, hosted by Kara Swisher, entrepreneur, activist and founder of the Internet Archive Brewster Kahle discussed the growth of the open internet and the importance of having a history of the internet available to everyone.

    The Internet Archive’s historical search engine, the "Wayback Machine," grows by half a billion pages a week.

    http://www.recode.net/2017/3/8/14843408/transcript-internet-archive-founder-brewster-kahle-wayback-machine-recode-decode

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  3. Google—50 Things That Made the Modern Economy

    The words ‘clever’ and ‘death’ crop up less often than ‘Google’ in conversation. That’s according to researchers at the University of Lancaster in the UK. It took just two decades for Google to reach this cultural ubiquity. Larry Page and Sergey Brin – Google’s founders – were not, initially, interested in designing a better way to search. Their Stanford University project had a more academic motivation. Tim Harford tells the extraordinary story of a technology which might shape our access to knowledge for generations to come.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04rv3v3

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  4. Chapter 4, Part 1 – The Early Search Engines And Yahoo | Internet History Podcast

    As the early web grows, the explosion of content and websites creates chaos. Early search engines are among the most popular sites on the early web, as users try to find their way around the new medium. Sites like Excite, Lycos, Alta Vista and others try to take an algorithm and data-based route to organizing the chaos, but the site that leaps to the front of the pack, Yahoo!, goes in the other direction, creating a hand-sorted directory.

    We learn how Jerry Yang and David Filo started Yahoo! in a trailer on the campus of Stanford University and prepare to make the first great brand of the Internet Era.

    http://www.internethistorypodcast.com/2014/05/the-early-search-engines-and-yahoo/

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  5. Public Or Private: Keeping Google From Being ‘Evil’ : NPR

    Google announced plans to adjust its privacy policy in order to allow the company to merge user data across email, social networking and other services. This has raised eyebrows in the tech community and even in Congress. So what exactly are the problems, and potential benefits, for this change in the policy of one of the world’s largest tech companies?

    http://www.npr.org/2012/01/29/146062607/public-or-private-keeping-google-from-being-evil

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  6. Eli Pariser: Beware online “filter bubbles”

    As web companies strive to tailor their services (including news and search results) to our personal tastes, there’s a dangerous unintended consequence: We get trapped in a "filter bubble" and don’t get exposed to information that could challenge or broaden our worldview. Eli Pariser argues powerfully that this will ultimately prove to be bad for us and bad for democracy.

    Pioneering online organizer Eli Pariser is the author of "The Filter Bubble," about how personalized search might be narrowing our worldview.

    http://www.ted.com/talks/eli_pariser_beware_online_filter_bubbles.html

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  7. LukeW | Audio: Innovations in Web Input

    Jared led off the discussion, by diving into one of Google’s latest public innovations, Google Instant. If you’ve missed the hubbub, Google Instant starts searching and returning suggested queries as you type. Luke saw this technology developed during his time at Yahoo!, back in 2005. They ended up not using the technique on Yahoo!’s search because… Tune in for the details.

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  8. Tim Brown: Change By Design

    Tim Brown

    CEO, IDEO; Author, Change By Design

    One myth of innovation is that brilliant solutions leap fully formed from the minds of geniuses. In reality, we don’t simply realize solutions; we design them. Design thinking is now being applied to address a wide range of concerns, from delivering clean drinking water to improving airport security and microfinancing.

    This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on November 9, 2009

    http://fora.tv/2009/11/09/Change_by_Design_Tim_Brown_of_IDEO

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  9. Stephen J. Dubner | SuperFreakonomics: Global Cooling, Patriotic Prostitutes, and Why Suicide Bombers Should Buy Life Insurance

    Freakonomics by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner spent more than two years on the New York Times Best Sellers list and sold more than 4 million copies worldwide. The book offered surprising insights into hot-button issues like cheating, crime, parenting, and class consciousness, in a compelling and readable style. Now, with SuperFreakonomics, the "rogue economist” and the award-winning journalist delve into the hidden agendas of all kinds of individuals, and the incentives that drive them. Featuring: Stephen J. Dubner is an author and journalist, formerly a writer and editor for The New York Times Magazine. The author’s Freakonomics blog on the New York Times website receives more than 1 million unique hits each month.

    http://libwww.freelibrary.org/podcast/?podcastID=452

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