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Tagged with “science” (619)

  1. BBC Radio 4 - The Infinite Monkey Cage, Series 9, Science and Spin

    A witty, irreverent and unashamedly rational look at the world of science communication.

    Listen in pop-out player

    This week on the Infinite Monkey Cage, Brian Cox and Robin Ince take to the stage at Manchester University, to discuss the state of science communication. Is the public engaged enough with the complexities of science? Are scientists engaging enough with the hoi polloi or still stuck in their ivory towers? And when was the ‘golden age’ of TV science, if it ever existed? Joining our presenters are scientists Matthew Cobb and Sheena Cruikshank, comedian Helen Keen and legendary science TV presenter and writer, James Burke, whose classic series ‘Connections’ captivated audiences around the world.

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  2. David Eagleman: The Brain and The Now - The Long Now

    02016 marks The Long Now Foundation’s 20th year and we are holding our first ever Long Now Member Summit to showcase and connect with our amazing community on Tuesday October 4, 02016 from noon to 11:30pm, at Fort Mason Center in San Francisco.

    David Eagleman will be giving the keynote talk on "The Brain and The Now" and will be joined onstage after his talk by Stewart Brand and Danny Hillis for further discussion and Q&A.

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  3. Jonathan Rose: The Well Tempered City - The Long Now

    Cities and urban regions can make coherent sense, can metabolize efficiently, can use their very complexity to solve problems, and can become so resilient they “bounce forward” when stressed.

    In this urbanizing century ever more of us live in cities (a majority now; 80% expected by 2100), and cities all over the world are learning from each other how pragmatic governance can work best.

    Jonathan Rose argues that the emerging best methods focus on deftly managing “cognition, cooperation, culture, calories, connectivity, commerce, control, complexity, and concentration.”

    Unlike most urban theorists and scholars, Rose is a player.

    A third-generation Manhattan real estate developer, in 1989 he founded and heads the Jonathan Rose Company, which does world-wide city planning and investment along with its real estate projects—half of the work for nonprofit clients.

    He is the author of the new book, THE WELL-TEMPERED CITY: What Modern Science, Ancient Civilizations, and Human Nature Teach Us About the Future of Urban Life.

    The Jonathan F.P. Rose book tour is being sponsored by Citi who is happy to provide a copy of his new book, The Well-Tempered City: What Modern Science, Ancient Civilizations and Human Behavior Teach Us About the Future of Urban Life, to everyone in attendance. Citi supports the efforts of individuals like Jonathan Rose whose work aligns with their mission to enable progress in communities across the globe.

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  4. How to Make a Golden Record - Science Friday

    Less than a year before NASA’s Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft were scheduled for takeoff, astronomer Carl Sagan and SETI researcher Frank Drake received an intriguing proposal from the space agency: Would they be interested in crafting a message to alien civilizations to accompany Voyager on its interstellar journey? Over the next nine months, Sagan, Drake, and a small team of scientists and artists scrambled to compile a unique document—part time capsule, part interstellar greeting—to send to the stars. The Golden Record was born.

    Over the next three weeks, Science Friday is celebrating the legacy of the Golden Record, in anticipation of Voyager’s 40th anniversary next year. And we’re asking you: What would you include on a Golden Record?

    This week, we explore the Golden Record’s history with two of its creators. Ann Druyan was the creative director for the record project (she would go on to co-write COSMOS: A Personal Voyage with her husband Carl Sagan). And Drake, author of the Drake equation, helmed the record’s picture sequence. Together, they join Ira to remember those frenzied months when they compiled the Golden Record—a “best of” collection of science, art, and ingenuity.

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  5. A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived | Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm, 3:08 pm on 20 September 2016 | Radio New Zealand

    Each of us carries an epic poem in our cells. DNA tells the story of our murky origins, shaped by evolution, to our current obsession with tracing our ancestry.

    That nucleic acid has the genetic information needed to make all living things. But it’s not the whole story, not even close according to former geneticist, now host of the BBC’s Inside Science.

    Adam Rutherford says the human genome should not be read as instruction manuals, but as epic poems.

    His new book A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived separates the myths about what DNA can and can’t tell us about ourselves, where we came from and where the human race is going.

    He uses a metaphor to help people get their head around what DNA is – that of sheet music and an orchestra.

    “More often than not people have referred to DNA as a blueprint or an instruction manual.

    “Sometimes that can be quite misleading because if something’s a blueprint it implies that all the plans are laid out and it has this association with biological determinism – what your genes are is what you will be.”

    And he says we now know that’s not true.

    “The sheet music for a piece of music is the same whether you buy it in 1906 or 2006 but the interpretation of that is down to the conductor and the orchestra and all of the annotations, the layering and the performance.

    “This feels like a better way of describing nature and nurture which results in the symphony which is us.”

    As to forking out hard earned money to find out your ancestry, through DNA profiling don’t bother, he says.

    “We now know about ancestry that we’re all incredibly inbred, the last common ancestor of all Europeans was only about four or five hundred years ago.

    "If you pay them to tell you your ancestors were vikings, it’s true, but only because everyone is. The truth is all of us have ancestors who were vikings and Jews and Indians."

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  6. BBC Radio 4 - Desert Island Discs, William Gibson

    This week the castaway on Desert Island Discs is William Gibson. Long before the existence of the Internet, he wrote about ‘cyberspace’, a boundless world reached only through computers. External space travel, to the Moon and Mars, had become old hat. By creating internal space, he breathed new life into science fiction. In conversation with Sue Lawley, he talks about his life and work and chooses eight records to take to the mythical island.

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  7. 57: Ubik

    THRILL as stock genre trappings warp and mutate under the power of weird genius! MARVEL as brains-in-a-vat reality paranoia crosses over into theology and metaphysics! WONDER as interplanetary travel and communication with the dead are outstripped in strangeness by the mysteries of…The Commodity Form!

    The Sometime Seminar discusses the metaphysical science-fiction novel Ubik (1969) by Philip K. Dick.

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  8. 42: The Southern Reach Trilogy

    How many forms of uncanny weirdness can you cram into one trilogy? Can the Netflix model of binge consumption work for novels as well as TV shows? And should you settle for a mystery when you could have a mythos?

    The Sometime Seminar discusses Jeff VanderMeer’s just-completed Southern Reach Trilogy of short weird/horror novels: Annihilation, Authority, and Acceptance (all 2014).

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  9. 25: Inverted World

    The Sometime Seminar discusses Inverted World, an early (1974) work of science fiction by Christopher Priest, along with his more recent writing about the genre.

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  10. 16: The Bigendian Trilogy

    Improbably cool heroes investigate implausibly cool mysteries at the behest of impossibly cool billionaires! Is cool-obsession just another form of geekiness?

    This episode of The Sometime Seminar discusses the novels of William Gibson’s “Bigendian Trilogy” or “Blue Ant Trilogy”: Pattern Recognition (2003), Spook Country (2007), and Zero History (2010).

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