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Tagged with “sci-fi” (232)

  1. Russell Hoban meets the Guardian book club

    The author of Riddley Walker explains to Professor John Mullan how following the ‘hobo journeys’ of his mind led him to his troubling vision of the future.

    Speculating about why readers are drawn to stories as painful as his account of the pinched, raw existence in the wake of a future nuclear catastrophe, Russell Hoban explains to his audience that "people like to read about people in the last extremity of nothing left".

    His own engagement with the material, as he explains, came about rather more accidentally after an unplanned visit to Canterbury Cathedral that set his mind off on "one of its hobo journeys" that mysteriously deliver him his plots.

    Riddley Walker is remarkable for its reimagining of English in the wake of a collapse of civilisation, and similarly Hoban says that this was not how he started out: "I began in straight English and left it behind", discovering a new tongue that "is an active character and fed me things I wouldn’t otherwise have thought of" including the character of Riddley.

    Unusually for a book club guest, Hoban is accompanied by one of his characters, in this case Mr Punch, who features in the novel as "the absolutely lawless force that wants what it wants immediately", but is fortunately on pretty restrained form for the occasion.

    http://www.theguardian.com/books/audio/2010/nov/29/russell-hoban-guardian-book-club

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  2. 291: I Like Complicated Books, Glenn

    "Aurora" and "Luna: New Moon" - Our Book Club returns to read two recent, highly praised science fiction novels. From Kim Stanley Robinson comes “Aurora,” the story of a spaceship sent from Earth to a far-off star in a trip that will take generations. And from Ian McDonald comes “Luna: New Moon,” a sort of “Dallas” (or is it “The Godfather”?) set on and under the surface of the moon. Plus, what else are we reading?

    Host Jason Snell with Scott McNulty, Aleen Simms, Erika Ensign and Glenn Fleishman.

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  3. A science fiction writer from the Soviet Union found the secret to time-travel | Public Radio International

    If you think about what life will be like in say, five to ten years, you can alter the course of history. That’s what Genrich Altshuller may have done.

    http://www.pri.org/stories/2016-03-10/science-fiction-writer-soviet-union-found-secret-time-travel

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  4. BBC Radio 3 - Sound of Cinema, British Sci-Fi from the BFI Days of Fear and Wonder

    Matthew Sweet is joined by Oscar-winning composer Steven Price for a review of music written for British Sci Fi films, recorded on London’s South Bank as part of the BFI Sci Fi Festival -"Days of Fear and Wonder".

    Matthew and Steve begin their survey with Arthur Bliss’s famous score for the HG Well’s inspired film "Things To Come". They look at the work of James Bernard and Tristram Cary for the Quatermass films and reflect on scores for "The First Men In The Moon"; "2001 - A Space Odyssey"; "Alien"; "Brazil"; "Flash Gordon" "The Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy"; "Sunshine"; "Inception"; "Under The Skin" and "Gravity".

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b04t91rq

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  5. The Force Awakens

    The inevitable opinion piece on that movie.

    https://adactio.com/journal/10067

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  6. William Gibson, part one by A Phone Call From Paul | Free Listening on SoundCloud

    In part one of Paul Holdengraber’s conversation with William Gibson topics include the future, the past, and how weird and cool the phone is.

    https://soundcloud.com/lithub/william-gibson-part-one

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  7. Andy Weir: The Red Planet for Real - The Long Now

    Andy Weir’s self-published novel The Martian has become a New York Times bestseller and the #1 movie in America. But it began with a series of blog posts that reflected Andy’s lifelong love of space science and detailed research about traveling to and surviving on the fourth planet in our Solar System.

    You can see the film in theaters everywhere, but only at The Interval will you hear Andy skip the fiction and talk about the details of how a real world mission to reach and colonize Mars would work. He’ll discuss his book, too, and answer your questions at this very special event in our Interval salon series.

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02015/oct/27/red-planet-real/

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  8. dConstruct 2015: John Willshire

    John comes all the way to Brighton to have a face-to-face chat with Jeremy about the troubling ethical questions around who gets to design the future. Together they discuss the contrasting parenting patterns on display in Man Of Steel and Inception. Also: the HR issues raised by Ex Machina and Top Gun.

    Warning: contains mental images of Michael Caine as the interface of the connected home that is the Fortress Of Solitude. Not a lot o’ people know that.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/

    John Willshire is the founder of innovation studio, Smithery.

    Smithery helps organisations Make Things People Want, rather than Make People Want Things. It lies somewhere on a strange map that features Product & Service Design, Research, Media, Marketing, Innovation and Organisational theory.

    A proponent of a constructionist learning theory (i.e. Making Is Thinking), John has recently completed a new thesis on the relationship in organisations between People and Space, which has spawned a lot of tools, instruments and methods on how you can make the things you want to happen, happen (someone observed one of them “looks a bit… Gallifreyan” which is brilliant.)

    Since 2011, Smithery has worked with numerous people including Konica Minolta, Penguin Random House, The Design Museum, Experian, Oxfam, Google, Carlsberg, Adaptive Lab, Gravity Road, Saïd Business School at The University of Oxford, London College of Communications, The Huffington Post, Royal Mail, Samsung, Google, Channel 4 and Skype.

    John also created Artefact Cards, a way to help people and teams play with ideas, making up card games to find better ideas whilst having more fun. There are now over a million Artefact Cards are now out there in the world, helping people work in new ways, and they’ve been covered by everyone from the Financial Times and Maria Popova’s Brainpickings.

    Prior to founding Smithery, John spent seven years at PHD Media in London, becoming Head of Innovation in 2007 when that wasn’t a thing.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/speaker/john-willshire

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  9. dConstruct 2015: Chris Noessel

    This one gets super-nerdy. Jeremy and Chris geek out about interfaces in science fiction films, from Logan’s Run to Iron Man, applying the principle of apologetics along the way. To kick off, Chris humours Jeremy’s crackpot theory about the Star Wars universe, and to wrap up, Chris unveils a very special event taking place the evening before dConstruct.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/

    In his day job at Cooper, Christopher designs products and services for a variety of domains, including health, financial, and consumer; as well as teaching, speaking, and evangelising design internationally. Prior experience includes developing kiosks for museums, helping to visualise the future of counter-terrorism, building prototypes of coming technologies for Microsoft, and designing telehealth.

    His spidey-sense goes off semi-randomly, leading him to speak about a range of things including interactive narrative, ethnographic user research, interaction design, sex-related technologies, free-range learning, generative randomness, and designing for the future.

    He is co-author of Make It So: Interaction Design Lessons from Science Fiction (Rosenfeld Media 2012), and the force behind the blog scifiinterfaces.com.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/speaker/chris-noessel

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. dConstruct 2015: Ingrid Burrington

    Jeremy and Ingrid geek out together on the physical infrastructure of the internet, time travel narratives, and William Gibson’s The Peripheral (contains a spoiler warning, but no actual spoilers).

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/

    Ingrid Burrington writes, makes maps, and tells jokes on a small island off the coast of America. She’s a member of Deep Lab, the author of Networks of New York: An Internet Infrastructure Field Guide, and currently an artist in residence at the Data and Society Research Institute.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/speaker/ingrid-burrington

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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