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Tagged with “remix” (11)

  1. Why Remix ‘Sgt. Pepper’s’? Giles Martin, The Man Behind The Project, Explains : All Songs Considered : NPR

    Why would anyone remix one of the most important and influential albums of all time? Giles Martin explains how and why he did it for Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.

    http://www.npr.org/sections/allsongs/2017/05/23/528678711/why-remix-sgt-peppers-giles-martin-the-man-behind-the-project-explains

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  2. Everything Is a Remix, so Steal Like an Artist

    While many have described the new world of remix culture where “nothing is original,” few have provided practical advice for those of us who find ourselves living and making things in it. Join filmmaker Kirby Ferguson (creator of the video series EVERYTHING IS A REMIX) and artist Austin Kleon (author of NEWSPAPER BLACKOUT and STEAL LIKE AN ARTIST) as they show clips from Kirby’s work and discuss how one best goes about being a creator in the digital age.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Digital Sampling and Remix Culture: Creativity or Criminality?

    If the term sample reminds you more of a cheese tasting than music making, this video is for you. DJ, music producer and clothing designer Aaron LaCrate walks us through Sampling 101—taking a snippet of a song and repurposing it in another work. LaCrate explains the process but doesn’t sample in his own music — to "clear" a lifted beat for use is complicated, and expensive.

    Musicians have always borrowed from others — tunings, vocal styles, distinctive phrasings. But the advent of the sampler in the 80s brought borrowing into the digital age. Today, "sampling," or lifting a snippet of someone else’s work — anything from a horn hit to a drum beat — is mainstream. But how to credit and pay those earlier artists for their contribution is where things get thorny. How much of someone else’s work should artists be able to use? How much should they pay for it? Is copyright law stuck in the age of analog?

    http://www.sciencefriday.com/program/archives/201101287

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  4. Rethinking Remix

    First Monday Podcast interviews Lawrence Lessig about his new book Remix: Making art and commerce thrive in the hybrid economy. Podcast Editors AJ Hannah and Joy Austria take on Remix - what worked, what didn’t and what ideas were left out of the mix. Lastly, Jennifer Kelley reviews NPR: Technology Podcast.

    From: http://www.firstmondaypodcast.org/

    Transcript: http://www.firstmondaypodcast.org/transcript_nov08.htm

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  5. Spark Episode 73: Copyright, the public domain, and remix culture

    On this episode of Spark: Copyright, the public domain, and remix culture:

    • Kutiman remixes YouTube on THRU YOU (full interview)
    • Teru remixes Nora’s full interview with Kutiman to win Spark’s remix contest
    • James Boyle tries to balance intellectual property rights and the public domain (full interview)
    • Jean Dryden demystifies Canadian copyright law
    • Elizabeth mentions several helpful links
    • Nora mentions her full interview with Jason Kottke (coming soon)

    This episode features Creative Commons music and sound effects:

    • “Wadidyusay?” by Zap Mama
    • “Climbing the Mountain” by Podington Bear
    • “Spark Kutiman Interview Minute” by teru
    • “Movin’ on Up” by Chad Crouch

    http://www.cbc.ca/spark/2009/04/episode-73-april-8-11-2009/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Remix: Making Art and Commerce Thrive in the Hybrid Economy by Lawrence Lessig, Shepard Fairey and Steven Johnson

    What is the future for art and ideas in an age when practically anything can be copied, pasted, downloaded, sampled, and re-imagined?

    LIVE from the NYPL and WIRED Magazine kick off the Spring 2009 season with a spirited discussion of the emerging remix culture. Our guides through this new world—who will take us from Jefferson’s Bible to André the Giant to Wikipedia—will be Lawrence Lessig, author of Remix, founder of Creative Commons, and one of the leading legal scholars on intellectual property issues in the Internet age; acclaimed street artist Shepard Fairey, whose iconic Obama "HOPE" poster was recently acquired by the National Portrait Gallery; and cultural historian Steven Johnson, whose new book, The Invention of Air, argues that remix culture has deep roots in the Enlightenment and among the American founding fathers.

    From http://www.nypl.org/research/chss/pep/pepdesc.cfm?id=5206

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